Skip to main content

Full text of "Radio TV Mirror (Jul-Dec 1955)"

See other formats


Scanned from the collections of 
The Library of Congress 



AUDIOVISUAL CONSERVATION 
at The UBRARY of CONGRESS 






imM^^ : rfHL^f ^ ^ J 



Packard Campus 

for Audio Visual Conservation 

www.loc.gov/avconservation 

Motion Picture and Television Reading Room 
www.loc.gov/rr/mopic 

Recorded Sound Reference Center 
www.loc.gov/rr/record 



i 



hi 



' 



,„.u».«* "-"* 



:,^^^ 





M 



MIRRO 



EXCLUSIVE 
STORIES: 



ADIO MIRROR 



Wm DESMOND 
lot teenagers really 
want to know! 







Q^,w <v Bid^ "^^ "'^^^a-ab Q^^ 




MIONDERFUL NEW EASIT-TO-DO PIN-CURL PERMANENT 






In hairdos, today's look is the soft look, and Procter & Gamble's wonderful 
new pin-curl home permanent is especially designed to give it to you. A 
PIN-IT wave is soft and lovely as a pin-curl set, never tight and kinky. PIN-IT 
is so wonderfuUtj different. There's no strong ammonia odor while you 
use it or left in your hair afterwards. It's eastj on your hair, too, so you 
can use it more often. And PIN-IT is far easier to give. You can do it all 
by yourself. Just put your hair up in pin curls and apply PIN-IT's Waving 
Lotion. Later, rinse and let dry. With self-neutralizing PIN-IT, you get 
waves and curls where you want them ... no resetting needed ... a 
permanent and a set in one step. For a wave that looks soft and lovely 
from the very first day and lasts weeks and weeks — try PIN-IT ! 






$|SO 



^L-i'il 



J 






i K 



BY PROCTER & GAMBiC 






\>\\ 







Small-fry experts at work...testing NEW IPANA 
-the best-tastin g way to fight decay 



Here's a break for the sub-sub deb 
set: the tooth paste that's so wonderful 
for their teeth now has a brand-new 
flavor! It's minty and marvelous — in- 
vites pint-size experts to brush often (the 
best way to save pretty teeth). 

And new Ipana with bacteria -fighter 
WD-9 gives extra protection to precious 
teeth. This new formula destroys decay 



bacteria measurably better than any 
other leading tooth paste . . . even better 
than fluoride! 

So with every happy brushing, your 
family's teeth get Ipana's extra protec- 
tion . . . the pleasantest way — good rea- 
son to change to Ipana today! It's at all 
toiletry counters in the yellow and red- 
striped carton. 




New-Formula IPANA^ 

Wrm BACTERIA-DESTROYER WD-9 



■<^ 







PRODUCTS OF BRISTOL-MYERS 



Ipana A/C Tootti Paste (Ammoniated Chlorophyll) also contains bacteria-destroyer WD-9 (Sodium Lauryl Sulphate). 




See how exciting this new luxury 
lather makes your hair! Glowing 
clean, silky. . . so manageable! 
Conditions any hair. That's the 
magic touch ofSHAMPOO PLUS EGG! 
Try it! 294, 59<t, $1. 



JULY, 1955 



TV 



MIRROR 



VOL. 44, NO. 2 



N. Y., N. J., Conn. Edition 



Ann Higginbotham, Editor 



Ann Mosher, Executive Editor 
Teresa Buxton, Managing Editor 
Ellen Taussig, Associate Editor 
Claire Safran, Assistant Editor 



Jack Zasorin, Art Director 

Frances Maly, Associate Art Director 

Joan Clarke, Art Assistant 

Bud Goode, W^est Coast Editor 



people on the air 

What's New from Coast to Coast by Jill Warren 16 

Winners of Feather Your Nest Contest, Home Edition 25 

A Family to Cherish (Bob Cummings) by Bud Goode 29 

Cinderella with a Song (Peggy King) by Gordon Budge 32 

Live Up to Your Dreams (Johnny Desmond) by Helen Bolstad 34 

The Name's The Same (Bob Elliott and 

Ray Goulding) by Peter Charade 38 

This Life I Love (June Havoc) by Martin Cohen 40 

Never a Dull Moment (Lawrence Weber).. by Gregory Merwin 56 

So This Is Hollywood by Mitzi Green 58 

Where the Heart Belongs (Cathleen Cordell) by Mary Temple 60 

This Is Nora Dr.ake (picture story from the popular daytime serial)..,. 62 

The Long Way Home (Tom Moore) by Harold Keene 66 



-» 



features in full color 



Album of Daydramas {The Greatest Gift, Concerning Miss Marlowe, 

Hawkins Falls, First Love, The World Of Mr. Sweeney) 42 

Man of the House (Herb Nelson) by Ed Meyerson 46 

Honeymoon in the Sun (Steve Allen and 

Jayne Meadows) ...by Philip Chapman 50 

The Magic of Erin (Carmel Quinn) by Frances Kish 52 



your local station 



Everyone Goes for Broke (WRCA-TV) 4 

Head in the Clouds (WPTZ) 8 

Meet Alice Jackson (WJAR-TV) 14 

Master of Make-Believe (WVEC-TV) 26 



your special services 



Steve Allen's Turntable • 

Daytime Diary ^ 

New Designs for Living (needlecraft and transfer patterns) 12 

Information Booth 1° 

New Patterns for You (smart wardrobe suggestions) 24 

Inside Radio (program listings) '2 

TV Program Highlights '^4 

Cover portrait of Peggy King by Elmer Holloway (NBC-TV) 



buy your August copy early • on sole July 5 



PUBLISHED inONTHLV by Mactadden Publications, Inc., New 
exkutive', advertisino and editorial offices at 

20? East 42nd Street, New York. N. Y. Editorial Branch 
Offices- 321 South Beverly Drive. Beverly Hills. Calif., and 
221 North La salle Street, ChicaBO. 111. Irvinu S. Manheimer. 
President" Lee Andrews, Vice President; Meyer Dworkin, 
SecretaPyand Treasurer. Advertising offices also in Chicago 

S'ubscrIPtIon'^RATES: $3.00 one year. U. S. and Posses- 
rinn?nn!l Canada S.5 00 per year for all other countries. 
CHANGE OF ADDRESS 6 weeks' notice essential. When pes- 
Hihleoleas^! furnish stencil-impression address from a re- 
c-ent 'iBsie AddrSs J-hanges can be made only '', 5-°" v^-^"^.";? 
your old, as well as your new address. Write to TV Radio 
Mirror, ior, East 42nd Street. New York 17, N. Y. , 
MANUSCRIPTS: All manuscripts will be carefully considered, 
"ut publisher cannot be responsible f°;,^°g|,°'i,t'"{Sy"^|-„^ 



is advisable to keep a duplicate copy for your records. Only 
those manuscripts accompanied by stamped, self-addressed 
return envelopes or with sufficient return postage will be 
FOREIGN editions handled through Macfadden Publications 
International Corp.. 205 East 42nd street. New York 17, 
NY. Irving S. Manheimer. President; Douglaa Lockhart, 

RE-ENTERED^'as Second Class Matter, June 28, lO.M, at the 
Post Office at New York. N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 
lR7q Authorized as Second Class mail, P. O. Dept.. Ottawa, 
Ont Cannd.° cSpyrlght 1955 by Macfadden Publications, Inc. 
A 1 r'lEhts reserved under International Copyright Convention. 
A rilJ^itsTel^d under Pan-American Copyright Conven- 
tinn Todo.s dercchos reservados segun La Convencion Pan- 
Ame'ridana de Propledad Llterarla y Artistica. Title trademark 
reSutered in U. S. Patent Office. Printed in U. S. A. by Art 
Color Printing Company. 
STOKY Women's Group 



DOCTORS PROVE a one-minute massage with 

PALMOLIVE SOAP CAN GIVE YOU A 

GETS HIDDEN DIRT THAT ORDINARY CLEANSING METHODS MISS! 



I 



T Dirt lefr on ftce sfkr ordinary cleansing 




Rub your face hard with a 
cotton pad after ordinary 
casual cleansing with any 
soap or cold cream. You'll 
see that you didn't remove 
deep-down dirt and make- 
up. "Ordinary-clean" is just 
superficially clean! 





Beautfftlly clean afer 60-second f^lmoliVe ftda 




Rub your face the same way 
after 60-second massage 
with Palmolive. Pad is still 
snowy-white! "Palmolive- 
clean" is deep-down clean. 
Your skin is free of clinging 
dirt that casual cleansing 
misses. 




Owl- (L^oiplkjL JmiL CAN WORK SO THOROUGHLY 

^YET SO GENTLY! PALMOLIVE BEAUTY CARE CLEANS CLEANER, 
CLEANS DEEPER, WITHOUT IRRITATION! 



No matter what your age or type of skin, 
doctors have proved that Palmolive beauty 
care can give you a cleaner, fresher complex- 
ion the very first time you use it! That's 
because Palmolive care gets your skin deep- 
down clean by removing the hidden, clinging 
dirt that casual methods miss. 

Just massage your face with Palmolive's 
rich, gentle lather for 60 seconds, morning 



and night. Rinse and pat dry. It's that sim- 
ple! But remember . . . only a soap that is 
truly mild can cleanse thoroughly without 
leaving your face feeling drawn and uncom- 
fortable. And Palmolive's mildness lets you 
massage a full minute without irritation. 

Try mild Palmolive Soap today. In just 
60 seconds, you'll be on your way toward 
new complexion beauty! 



DOCTORS PROVE PALMOLIVE'S BEAUTY RESULTS! 



Everyone Goes "For 




"Sir Silken Speech" becomes silent and pensive as he relaxes over a game of chess, one of his many favorite pastimes. 



After SI years in broadcasting 
Norman Brokenshire, the man of many- 
firsts, continues to delight audiences 
with his wit, charm and versatility 




Harry Sriow, Broke, ond Jett MacDonold join talents on 
WRCA-TV to present a happy fare of comedy and music. 




NOWADAYS, around the WRCA-TV studios in New 
York, everyone is talking about "The New 
Norman Brokenshire." WRCA-TV viewers, 
however, know it's the same Norman Brokenshire — 
king of the ad Hb — of radio fame, and the "new" 
applies to his hour-long funfest. The Norman 
Brokenshire Show, ^een daily at 1 P.M. Aided 
by the talents of beautiful Jett MacDonald and hand- 
some Harry Snow, "Broke" presents a round of 
songs and comedy sketches, strums on his ukulele, 
and dances everything from a schottische to a 
Highland fling — all of which are spiced with his 
incomparable charm and wit. . . . From the beginning, 
Broke's audience and fan mail have been growing 
by leaps and more leaps, which is only natural 
for the man who holds a record of firsts in broad- 
casting. Some of these include broadcasting the first 
progi'am from a plane in flight, first to announce 
a horse race, fii'st free-lance announcer, and 
instigator of the radio serial. The latter occurred 
back in 1924 when — owing to bad weather, a 
scheduled act failed to appear at air time — announcer 
Brokenshire in desperation grabbed a book of short 
stories and read to the unseen audience. When 
the entertainer finally arrived. Broke stopped at 
the crucial point of a story and spoke those now- 
famous words: "Tune in tomorrow to find out what 
happens . . ." Not only did listeners tune in the 
next day, but for many days after, to hear what 
became a regular series of short-story readings 
by Broke. ... In addition to gaining fame as a 
special-events announcer. Broke became a com- 
mercial announcer of the highest order, appearing 
with such radio immortals as Eddie Cantor, Bing 
Crosby, Will Rogers and Major Bowes. . . . Born in 
Murcheson, Canada, young Mr. Brokenshire served 
in the U. S. Infantry prior to crashing radio, in 
1924, via Station WJZ. One of his first friends was 
the station manager's secretary. Broke well re- 
members his fii-st date with Eunice: lunch in Central 
Park. Romantic, perhaps — but also practical for 
the struggling young announcer. Before long. 
Broke was dictating his scripts to Eunice, who 
typed them up on her boss's time. "This became such 
a valuable service," Broke confesses, "I couldn't 
afEord to lose it, so I married her." Today, Broke 
and Eunice share two homes: A comfortable 
penthouse apartment in New York and a wonderful 
home on Long Island. Broke's weekday hide- 
away is the penthouse. "It's exactly what I've 
always wanted," he says. "There's a wonderful 
view of the river and a delightful breeze in the 
summer." Broke lives for the weekends when he 
can spend all his time at his other home on Lake 
Ronkonkoma. Twenty-two years ago, Broke fell 
in love with the site and determined to build a 
house there — which he literally did, mostly by 
himself. He still enjoys "fiddling and facing 
things at home," and is also handy in the kitchen, 
though he defers to Eunice, who has written two 
cookbooks. Broke's favorite "original" recipe 
is French Fried Liver, which is prepared by cutting 
liver in strips, roUing in a mixture of curry powder, 
pepper and salt, and frying in butter. . . . When 
Broke began his present TV show, he succumbed 
to his cautious nature and decided to rely on a 
tele-prompter rather than ad-lib in his inimitable 
style.. But, on the very first show, he discovered the 
prompter was too far away — and he had to ad-lib. 
This has proved to be for the best, because it has 
always been his warm, friendly naturalness, his great 
"gift of gab," that have made millions "go for Broke." 




Broke plays the uke for his own pleasure, as well as on 
his show. "Sweet Georgia Brown" is one of his pet tunes. 




An expert at doing it hinnself, Broke built his 3-car gar- 
age, machine shop, s+udio — even his 65-foo+ TV antenna. 




Mr. and Mrs. Brokenshire prepare a weekend snack. Al- 
though he's a capable chef, Broke says Eunice is the expert. 




Only Bobbi is specially designed to give the softly feminine wave 
needed for this new "Soft Talk" hairdo. No nightly settings necessary. 



NO TIGHT. FUSSY CURLS HERE! 

These hairdos were made with Bobbi - 

the special pin-curl permanent for 

softly feminine hairstyles 

Now your hair can be as soft and natural-looking as the hairdos 
shown here. Just give yourself a Bobbi — the easy pin-curl permanent 
specially designed for today's newest softly feminine hairstyles. 

A Bobbi looks soft and natural from the very first day. Curls and 
waves are exactly where you want them — wonderfully carefree 
for weeks. Pin-curl your hair just once. Apply Bobbi's special 
lotion. A little later rinse with water. Let dry, brush out. Right 
away your hair has the beauty, the body of naturally wavy hair. 

New 20-Page Hairstyle Booklet! Colorful collection of new softly feminine hairstyles. 
Easy-to-follow setting instructions. Hints! Tips! Send now for "Sef-/f-yourse/f Hairstyles." 
Your name, address, 10c in coin to: Bobbi, Box 3600, Merchandise Mart, Chicago, III. 



With Bobbi you get waves exactly where you want 
them, the way you want them. Notice the easy, gen- 
tle look of this bewitching new "La Femme" hairdo. 




Bobbi's soft curls make a natural, informal wave like 
this possible. A Bobbi gives you the kind of carefree 
curls needed for this gay "Satin Sweep" hairdo. 




Just pin-curls and Bobbi. No separate neutralizer, no curlers, no resetting. Every- 
thing you need — New Creme Oil Lodon, special bobby pins. #1.50 plus tax. 



Bobbi is made especially to give young, free and easy 
hairstyles like this "Honeycomb" hairdo. And the 
curl is there to stay — in all kinds of weather. 




STEVE ALLEN'S 
TURNTABLE 



WELL, spring has sprung, so before you 
take off for sunimer romance and 
fun, let's give a listen to some new 
records. 

"Play Me Hearts and Flowers" was a big 
hit for Johnny Desmond, and now Coral 
has used it as the title for a new album by 
Johnny. The Desmond croon style comes 
across fine on such new tunes as "I'm So 
Ashamed,"' "A Woman's Loveliest When 
She Is Loved," "If I Could Only Tell You," 
and "Wayward Wife," among others. For 
good measure, Johnny has tossed in some 
of his recent single releases— "My Own 
True Love," "Song from Desiree," "The 
High and the Mighty," and of course, 
"Hearts and Flowers." 

Eddie Fisher's new twosome is most 
timely, to say the least — "Heart," and 
"Near to You" — because this is the month 
he and Debbie Reynolds plan to hear wed- 
ding beUs. Both tunes are from the new 
Broadway musical, "Damn Yankees," and 
either side could be another Fisher click. 
Victor must think so, too, as they have al- 
ready shipped a half-million copies to rec- 
ord stores. 

Patti Page has waxed "Near to You" 
also, but the backing — "I Love to Dance 
with You" — sounds more like the big side 
for Patti. She uses her familiar multiple- 
voice gimmick on it, and to excellent effect. 
(Mercury) 

Columbia is releasing a big special al- 
bimi, "Love Me or Leave Me," starring 
Doris Day, who also stars in the M-G-M 
musical movie of the same name. It's the 
life story of Ruth Etting, the famous popu- 
lar singer of early radio and recording 
days, who is now retired. In the album, 
Doris sings all the tunes she does in the 
picture, including such all-time favorites 
as "It All Depends on You," "At Sxm- 
down," "Mean to Me," "You Made Me 
Love You," and the title song, natch. Percy 
Faith, who also scored the movie, conducts. 

Columbia is also issuing an album of 
original recordings done by Ruth Etting, 
with some of the same tunes, made about 
a quarter of a century ago. 

Here's "Love Me or L^ave Me" again, 
this time in the Billy Eckstine style, as- 
sisted by Lou firing's orchestra and the 
Pied Pipers vocal group. On the reverse, 
Billy sings "Only You," giving it the sUght 
rhythm-and-blues treatment, but still 
managing to retain the flavor of a ballad, 
which is a neat trick these days. (M-G-M) 

Les Paul and Mary Ford don't have to 
worry much about trends, as their indi- 
vidual style of recording does right well 
by them. On their latest, the Mr. and Mrs. 
Guitar team do a beat thing called "Gen- 
uine Love" and the plaintive "No Letter 
Today," which is sort of a country-West- 
ern classic. (Capitol) 

Two more original-cast albums of 
Broadway musical comedies are coming 



out any minute, courtesy of Victor. The 
first is the complete score of "Damn 
Yankees," which s+ars Gwen Verdon and 
Stephen Douglass, and the second is 
"Three for Tonight," with Marge and 
Gower Champion and Harry Belafonte. 

Rosemary Clooney lends her pretty 
voice to "Love Among the Young," one of 
the loveliest ballads of the year, and it 
should be a lovely hit for Rosie. On the 
coupling she does "A Touch of the Blues" 
and, in her own words, "I picked this one 
just to prove I can still sing a swing tune." 
And does she! (Columbia) 

"In the Wee Small Hours" is the title of 
a new album by Frank Sinatra, and a 
wonderful title it is for the collection of 
torch standards he sings — in excellent 
voice, too, by the way. There are sixteen 
songs in all, including such favorites as 
"Just One of Those Things," "Mood In- 
digo," "Glad to Be Unhappy," "Deep in a 
Dream," "I See Your Face Before Me," 
"Can't We Be Friends?" and "I Get along 
Without You Very Well." Lush arrange- 
ments and fine orchestral backing by Nel- 
son Riddle. (Capitol) 

Betty Madigan, the little singer who 
started off in high gear on records with 
her "Joey" hit, continues to move right 
along in the vocal sweepstakes. She does a 
fine job on her latest release of two pretty 
ballads, "I Had a Heart" and "Wonderful 
Words," accompanied by Joe Lipman's 
orchestra. (M-G-M) 

Eydie Gorme and Steve Lawrence, two 
of the singing youngsters on my Tonight 
show, who often record together, have 
come up with what I think is their best 
offering to date. Steve and Eydie give the 
rhythm treatment to the new tune called 
"Close Your Eyes" and back it up with an 
old favorite, "Besame Mucho," done in a 
Latin tempo. Dick Jacobs conducts on 
both. (Coral) 

Speaking of Tonight, I'm happy that so 
many of you folks liked my album, and 
I'm also pleased that Coral is releasing a 
single record of the song "Tonight," done 
by that talented baritone. Buddy Greco. 

Capitol has signed the cute little French 
singer, Line Renaud, and they're mighty 
excited about her first record, "If I Love," 
a ballad, and "Pam-Pou-De," a music-hall 
type of thing. Both tunes, by the way, 
were written by Line's husband, Louis 
Gaste, who is one of France's best-known 
composers and guitarists. Line is the gal 
Bob Hope discovered in Paris; she ap- 
peared with Hope on his TV show. 

Sammy Davis, Jr. has only been in the 
record big-time for little over a year, but 
he has become increasingly popular as a 
wax personality. And now Decca has put 
together an album called "Starring Sammy 
Davis, Jr." It includes some of his previ- 
ously released singles, such as "Hey There," 
"Birth of the Blues," and "This Is My Be- 



loved," as well as some well-known stand- 
ards, "Easy to Love," "September Song," 
"My Funny Valentine," "Because of You," 
"Lonesome Road," and "Stan' Up an' 
Fight" (from "Carmen Jones"). 

James Brown, otherwise known as Lieu- 
tenant Rip Masters of the Rin Tin Tin TV 
show, has made his second record follow- 
ing his successful debut with "Davy 
Crockett." James sings "The Berry Tree," 
the big song from the movie, "Many Riv- 
ers to Cross." Adults as well as the kids 
should like this one. On the coupling he 
does a straight ballad, "I Lost When I 
Found You." (M-G-M) 

Speaking of Davy Crockett, the lad has 
been such a click that Columbia is issuing 
the original Davy Crockett stories — as per- 
formed on the Disneyland TV series, with 
Fess Parker, Buddy Ebsen and George 
Bruns' orchestra — "Davy Crockett Goes to 
Congress," "Davy Crockett, Indian Fight- 
er," and "Davy Crockett at the Alamo." 

The complete soundtrack of the musical 
score from the M-G-M musical, "Inter- 
rupted Melody," has been put into album 
form by M-G-M Records. The movie is 
the life story of the famous operatic per- 
sonality, Marjorie Lawrence — whose active 
career ended when she became crippled 
and was confined to a wheelchair — with 
Eleanor Parker playing the Lawrence role. 
Also in the movie, and on the album, are 
Glenn Ford, Roger Moore and Cecil Kella- 
way. However, Eleanor Parker's "voice" 
is dubbed, and beautifully so, by the well- 
known soprano, Eileen Farrell. The musi- 
cal emphasis is on light-classical selections, 
but there are some popular songs included 
as well. Walter Ducloux conducts the 
M-G-M Studio Symphony and chorus. 

Well, it's time to go, and speaking of life 
stories in the movies, I'm about to leap to 
Hollywood to try my luck with "The Benny 
Goodman Story" at Universal-Internation- 
al. A musical, natch. See you next month. 




Les Paul and Mary Ford "do it again" 

with two fine numbers for Capitol. 




Mary's famous recipes have been tried and tasted by 
such people as "Ike" Eisenhower and Charles Lindbergh. 
Here, Hollywood star Alan Mowbray tries her 'burgers. 



<A'i 





After her history-making jet flight, Mary poses with husband 
Gill Robb Wilson (second from right) and Air Force officials. 



Mary Wilson keeps the 
airlines and airwaves buzzing— 

in a plane, or as WPTZ's 
gracious, vivacious ^'first lady 



?? 



HEAD IN THE CLOUDS 



THOUSANDS of viewers w^ithin sight and sound of Phila- 
delphia's Station WPTZ knovi^ Mary Wilson as the 
charming hostess of Pots, Pans And Personalities — the 
show that combines Mary's famous recipes with zesty 
dashes of music and personality interviews. Seen Mon- 
day, Tuesday and Friday at 2:30 P.M., the show also 
features singing-comedian Jack Wilson (no relation), 
who joins Mary in feting the entire membership of a 
woman's club on each program. . . . Well over a thou- 
sand requests for recipes come Mary's way each week. 
But, as housewives walk to the corner to mail these 
letters, many would be surprised to know that the jet 
plane zooming by overhead might very well be piloted 
by the same Mary Wilson. Jets are new to Mary, 
who is the second woman ever to pilot one. But flying 
itself is a long-time hobby and the blonde, gray-eyed 
TV hostess has more than 50,000 flying miles to her 
credit. Her instructor is her husband, Gill Robb Wil- 
son, editor and publisher of Flying Magazine. Mary 
boasts that she was able to land a plane the first time 
she tried flying one, but she adds that a perfect landing 
is something she hasn't achieved — "yet." . . . Mary has 



cooked for some of the world's most famous people, 
including President Eisenhower— to whom she served 
"baked beans made from scratch and baked all day." 
Last St. Patrick's day, Mary wanted to talk with Premier 
John A. Costello of Ireland and so, as casually as most 
women go to market, Mary flew to Dublin, recorded 
the interview, then flew back. . . . After graduating from 
Rider College in Trenton, Mary spent six years in the 
business world, rising from secretary to vice-president 
of a large Newark department store. She met her hus- 
band while he was a Presbyterian minister in Trenton. 
They were married in 1931. Their daughter and two 
grandchildren live in California, but this distance means 
little to the flying Wilsons. . . . Mary and Gill share a 
modern Philadelphia apartment, which boasts of 950- 
square-foot oil painting. The color pink is used through- 
out the five-room apartment, even to the ironing-board 
cover and the bird-cage cover. In her spare time, Mary 
plays golf, does little-theater acting and, of course, 
cooks. Mostly though, Mary Wilson likes heading sky- 
ward — in the very same direction as her popularity 
rating with Station WPTZ viewers. 



Lustre - Creme 
Shampoo... 




Cream or Lotion 



Never Dries 



"Yes, I use Lustre-Creme 
Shampoo," says Joan Crawford. It's 
the favorite of 4 out of 5 top 
Hollywood movie stars! 

It never dries your hair! Lustre- 
Creme Shampoo is blessed with 
lanoHn . . . foams into rich lather, 
even in hardest water . . . leaves 
hair so easy to manage. 

It becsutifies! For soft, bright, fra- 
grantly clean hair — without special 
after-rinses — choose the shampoo of 
America's most glamorous women. 
Use the favorite of Hollywood movie 
stars — Lustre-Creme Shampoo. 




starring m 

"FEMALE ON THE BEACH" 

A Universal-International Picture 







The naked truth about 
the girl in the locker room/ 

She's the belle of the beach . . .' even the 
waves seem to snuggle closer. She's the 
girl with the eye-stopping figure, slim 
waist, smooth hips, flat tummy. She's the 
girl you think it's impossible to be . . . 
(you're wrong.') She's the girl who never 
slips into a bathing suit or summer dress, 
pair of slacks or shorts, without first 
slipping into a Playtex Panty Brief.' 







Introducing the New Playtex 








Panty Brief 



And now, newer than new, and waiting for you is the 
Playtex High Style Panty Brief.' Magically slimming latex 
outside, cloud-soft fabric inside, and a lovely non-roll top. 
Comfortable, flexible . . . and not a seam, stitch or bone 
to show through— anyivhere ! Washes in seconds, dries 
quickly, and works miracles— no matter ivhat your size. 

Look for Playtex® High Style Panty Brief in the slim 
tube in department stores and specialty shops everywhere. 

And for extra control, the famous Playtex Magic-Controller 
Panty Brief with hidden "finger" panels. Only 16.95. The bra on 
the wall is the new Playtext Livingt Bra*... "custom-contoured" 
of elastic and nylon. $3.95 tTr.idcmaiK 



eiwoo International latex Corp'n. . . . PLAYTEX PARK . 



Playtex . 
Dover Del -k In Canada: Playtex Ltd. 



. known everywhcie as tlie girdle in the ulllVl tube. (^ 
. . PLAYTEX PARK . . . Arnprior, Ont. *u.s.A. and toieign 





fDaytime Diary 




All programs are heard Monday through Friday; consult 
local papers for time and station. 



I 



BACKSTAGE WIFE Mary Noble's 
efforts to forget her husband's involve- 
ment with actress Elise Shephard have 
plunged her into a difficult situation with 
HoUywood producer Malcolm Devereaux, 
who has promised her a starring career in 
movies. BeUeving Malcolm's promises are 
prompted by his love for her, Mary refuses 
his offers, but she is unprepared for the 
clever device by which he hopes to sep- 
arate her completely from Larry. NBC 
Radio. 

TUE BRMGHTER DAY New Hope's 
project for erecting a great Youth Center 
has led the Reverend Richard Dennis down 
some dangerous byways and into some 
strange company. Just what is the situa- 
tion between Lydia Herrick and her 
brother-in-law, Don Herrick, the tempera- 
mental architect who may — or may not — 
plan the Center? Will Lucius Devereux 
regret sponsoring him? Or will Dr. Dennis 
be able to help still another troubled soul? 
CBS-TV and CBS Radio. 

COXCERNIXG MISS MARLOWE 

Ever since her meeting with djmamic Jim 
Gavin, Maggie Marlowe has been unable 
to regain the tranquillity she sought so 
eagerly. Now the death of Jim's estranged 
wife has opened a new chapter of heart- 
ache for Maggie — heartache and perhaps 
other emotions as well. Although she can- 
not deny her strong feeling for Jim, will 
this latest tragedy stand in the way of 
any future happiness they wish to share? 
NBC-TV. 

TBE DOCTOR'S WIFE An unex- 
pected problem enters the Palmers' lives 
when young Dr. Fred Conrad falls in love 
with Julie. But the difficult, spoiled young 
girl who loves Fred is hardly the kind to 
discourage easily. How much of a hand 
can Julie herself take in turning Fred 
toward Eileen? And is Dan just a trifle 
overconfident about his conviction that his 
young assistant's feeling for Julie is un- 
fortunate only for Fred himself? NBC 
Radio. 

FIRST LOVE From the fu-st day of 
Zach's friendship with Petey, Laurie knew 
that she was the kind of girl who means 



trouble. But not even Laurie anticipated 
the kind of trouble Petey would bring to 
her marriage — the trouble that exploded 
into Zach's trial for Petey's murder. 
Knowing that her husband must be in- 
nocent, Laurie begins the tortuous un- 
raveling of Petey's past. Where do her 
suspicions lead? NBC-TV. 

THE GREATEST GIFT In most large 
communities a woman doctor is no longer 
an oddity, but in a small town there is still 
a certain amount of skepticism, and Dr. 
Eve Allen has had an uphill fight for the 
acceptance she has finally won. Will an 
accident for which she is not responsible 
result in the loss of ground she cannot 
hope to regain? Can she continue to ac- 
cept Dr. Stone's help under the circum- 
stances? NBC-TV. 

THE GUIDING LIGHT Some time ago 
Bertha warned her friend, Kathy Lang, 
that it was a mistake to expect that Dr. 
Jim Kelly would continue trading his de- 
votion for the careless friendship which is 
all Kathy has offered. But Kathy cannot 
forget her former husband, Dick Grant, or 
her stubborn feeling that despite Dick's 
disappearance, there is still something 
ahead for them. Will she throw happiness 
away? CBS-TV and CBS Radio. 

H.4WKI2VS FALLS Ever since Lona 
and Dr. Floyd Corey married, they have 
met and solved one problem after another 
in fairly perfect accord. But Lona finds it 
hard to be patient when Floyd deliberately 
flouts advice about his own health in 
order to continue looking after that of his 
patients. Will he drive himself too far 
unless Lona insists? And if she does in- 
sist, what will happen to their relationship? 
NBC-TV. 

HILLTOP HOUSE Fortunately for Julie • 
Nixon's peace of mind, orphanage prob- 
lems for which she is responsible keep her 
from becoming too intimately involved in 
the threatened breakup of her cousin 
Nina's marriage. Though she knows that 
the unstable Nina is heading for trouble, 
Julie has never believed that outsiders, 
however affectionate and interested, should 



interfere between man and wife. But what 
will stop Nina? CBS Radio. 

THE IXNER FLAME Dorie Lawlor 
faces the most difficult decision of her life 
when she agrees to leave town in return 
for her grandmother's putting up the 
money for Walter Manning's trial. Will 
three months away from Walter cure 
Doric's love? Does Walter's wife Portia 
really believe that she has lost him to 
Dorie? It's Portia's nature to fight — but as 
a lawyer she knows a hopeless fight when 
she sees one. CBS-TV. 

JOYCE JORDAN, M.D. As is always 
the case with older sisters, Joyce feels a 
big responsibility toward her star-struck 
young sister Kitty, who thinks she wants 
to be a dancer instead of marrying the nice 
young man who has asked her. Will Mike 
Hill's sponsorship of Kitty embarrass him? 
How much of Kitty's ambition is mere 
envy of her big sister, whose success as a 
doctor has not prevented her from de- 
veloping as a woman? NBC-TV. 

JUST PLAIN BILL For a long time 
Bill Davidson has dedicated himself to 
helping others, and all of Hartville looks 
upon him as a man to whom friends can 
bring their troubles. But as Bill finds that 
more and more of late he must involve his 
daughter Nancy and her husband, Kerry 
Donovan, he begins to wonder iJE he is 
justified in allowing danger, which he 
himself does not fear, to come so close to 
them. NBC Radio. 

LORENZO JONES Belle's long fight to 
help Lorenzo regain his memory and re- 
instate their marriage receives a serious 
setback with the murder of Roger Caxton. 
Fearful that this tragedy will drive them 
further apart. Belle accepts the help of 
Denis Scott, even though she knows that 
he is in love with her. Will the young 
writer be true to his promise to help, or 
has he some other scheme of his own to 
win Belle himself? NBC Radio. 

T 
LOVE OF LIFE In a misguided desire V 
to protect Vanessa, Paul Raven has fought r 
desperately to prevent a meeting between 
(Continued on page 22) 



NEW DESIGNS FOR LIVING 




7158 




705 



7158-^Easiest stitches (mainly quick 
cross-stitch and outline) make the prettiest 
designs ever. Transfer of embroidery motifs; 
twelve ballet dancers, 5% to 7% inches 
tall; 32 flowers, 1 to 3 inches. 25(} 

705 — Mom, be thrifty: Use remnants for 
boy-or-girl play tops and pants. They're 
cool and comfortable! Pattern pieces in 
sizes for 6-month, 1-year, 18-month babies. 
Transfer of embroidery included. 250 

637 — Her full skirt's a protective cover 
for your electric mixer. Easy-to-make — 
use scraps. Pattern pieces, transfer of 
embroidery motifs, complete directions. 25^ 



T 
V 
A 

12 



7272 — Add a touch of real luxury to your 
room. Crisp, dainty pineapple-design 
crochet forms a new and different lacy 
chair-set. Directions included. 250 

7245 — ^Just three main pattern parts — easy 
to make. And that frosty embroidery is a 
fun-to-do fashion touch. Misses' Sizes 
12-20. Pattern pieces, transfer of 
embroidery motifs. State size. 250 

874 — One hexagon (20 inches diagonally, 
point to point) — pineapple design — makes 
a centerpiece; two a scarf; seven a cloth! 
Crochet a 20-inch hexagon in No. 30 Mercer- 
ized cotton ; larger in knitting and crochet 
cotton; smaller in No. 50 cotton. 250 






Send twenty-five cents (in coins) for each 
New York 11, N. Y. Add five cents for 



pattern to: TV Radio Mirror, Needlecraft Service, P.O. Box 137, Old Chelsea Station, 
each pattern for first-class mailing. Send an additional 250 for Needlecraft Catalog. 



For the Easiest Permanent 
of Your Life . . . 







SET IT / 



N 



Set yoiir pin-curls just as you always do, 
_ No need for anyone to help. 




^f WET IT / 



Apply CASUAL lotion just once. 
15 minutes later, rinse with clear water. 





fcASUAL 

PIN-CURL A 



FORGET IT/ 



That's all there is to it ! CASUAL is 

self-neutralizing. There's no resetting. 

Your work is finished I 



Naturally lovely, carefree curls 

that last for weeks . . . 

Casual is the word for it . . . soft, carefree waves 

and curls — never tight or kinky — beautifully manageable, 

perfect for the new flattering hair styles that highlight the softer, 

natural look. Tonight — give yourself the loveliest wave 

of your life— a Casual pin-curl permanent! 

takes just 15 minutes more than setting your hair! 

$1.50 PLUS TAX 




T 
V 
R 

13 



MEET 
ALICE JACKSON 





Her pearls came unclasped as Alice donated blood on 
TV, but the show helped the Red Cross meet its quota. 



14 




Mennber of the pulpit committee, Alice chats 
with Rev. Sherrard of the First Baptist Church. 



Friendliness, sincerity and 

ingenuity make her W JAR-TV program 

a daily highlight for Rhode Islanders 



EARLIER this year, when Ahce Jackson was in a 
hospital with virus pneumonia, her WJAR-TV 
viewers sent so many cards and letters they had 
to be brought in to Alice by the basket-full. "The 
attendants and nurses were amazed," Alice recalls, 
"and I was, too. I always knew I had a wonderful 
audience for my television program but their personal 
interest in my welfare certainly thrilled me." . . . 
This month, Alice marks her fifth year as the star 
of Let's Go Shopping, seen weekdays at 1 P.M. During 
this time, her sincere and lively charm have 
endeared her to Rhode Island viewers, both young 
and old, male and female. A family program, Alice's 
half-hour features good buys in clothing and house- 
hold products, fashion shows, and a guest-room 
portion where Alice interviews representatives of 
various community organizations on their up -coming 
affairs. . . . Alice, who attended the University of 
Hawaii and majored in home economics at Cornell 
University, served as a dietitian at the Rhode 
Island School of Design before her entry into radio 
and then TV. On or off camera, her life is closely 
allied with the life of her community. Active in 
church affairs since the age of six, Alice closes 
her Friday programs with an inspirational message 
delivered alternately by a minister, priest and 
rabbi. . . . Whenever it is humanly possible, Alice 
attends the bazaars, entertainments and numerous 
other events she discusses on her programs. "I don't 
like to disappoint anybody," she says seriously. 
She is a charter member of American Women in Radio 
and Television and is currently TV director of the 
New England Chapter of that organization. A member 
of the Providence Players for the past several years, 
Alice has served on the "front of the house" com- 
mittee for eight seasons. "Everything I love is right 
around me," she says of her home on Providence's 
historic Benefit Street, "my church, the Players, 
the art centers." Alice's busy schedule is that of 
a woman with a zest for life. She loves to travel, 
and her favorite vacation spot is Block Island. "If I 
ever decide to leave the States," she says, "I'll go to 
Hawaii. Why, I've even started to brush up on the uke 
for my visit there this summer." Wherever she travels, 
her many WJAR-TV friends wish Alice "Godspeed." 




Yes... it's 

FLORIDA 

CALLING ! 



Did you say 

TOM 
MOORE ? 




MBS 
VUUM 



LISTEN to this . . . listen every weekday to the MUTUAL program that ships 
Florida sunshine all over the country— through the sparkling style of 
its emcee, Tom Moore, and his star performers and musicians. Be at your 
phone with the right answer to an intriguing question he'll ask you. 
WIN a 10-day, all-expenses-paid, Florida vacation for two. You'll be glad 
you listened . . . glad to be alive . . . glad of FLORIDA CALLING. 

Mondays through Fridays 11 :00 to 11 :25 NYT 

Presented coast to coast by The Florida Citrus Commission 

(See local listings for time on your MUTUAL station) 

MUTUAL BROADCASTING SYSTEM -a service of General Teleradio Inc. 



15 



What's New from Coast 



• By JILL WARREN 




Proud parents Dick Van Patfen and Pat Poole have their son 
baptized Richard Nels by Father Scanlon. Dick is Nels on Mama. 




Musicomic Victor Borge, a Person To Person grad, punctuates 
a pet story for Edward R. Murrow at New York's Barberry Roonn. 





1 


sfcrf... ..^^^^^^H 




W^~ 


*^' ^^t^^m 




h- 


im 


Wi:X'-/~.>Z£ 


s 


^^mHHHH^HB 



Summer brings Julius La Rosa to 
CBS-TV with his own daily show. 



ON JUNE 12, NBC Radio will 
launch an exciting new program 
called Monitor, which is reported to 
be the "last word" in broadcasting. 
Monitor will be heard continuously 
from 8 A.M. (Eastern time) Saturday 
to midnight, Sunday, and will be 
divided into ten four -hour segments. 
An elaborate two-way communica- 
tion system has been devised to pick 
up interesting and up-to-date reports 
from roving correspondents through- 
out this country and Europe. In addi- 
tion to giving the latest news, sports, 
weather, local and special features, 
Monitor will present a wide variety 
of entertainment — from comedy and 
drama to music and celebrity inter- 
views. There will even be live pick- 
ups from NBC's weekend television 
shows — for example, on Saturday 
night. Monitor listeners might hear, 
via radio, part of The George Gohel 
Show, or on Sunday night, a song by 
Dean Martin on the Colgate show. 

Julius La Rosa is all set to start his 
thirteen-week summer series on 
CBS-TV, the night of June 27. Julie 
will replace Perry Como, Jo Stafford 
and Jane Froman — with a musical 
show, of course, to be seen Monday 
through Friday, for fifteen minutes. 
Meanwhile, Perry Como is deep in 
plans for his new hour show, to be 
seen over NBC -TV. The show is 
scheduled for Saturday night, op- 
posite Jackie Gleason, and will start 
some time in September. 

Good news for Ethel And Albert 
fans: The popular domestic comedy 
will be a part of CBS-TV's summer 
schedule, replacing the vacationing 
December Bride series on Monday 
nights, as of June 20. Peg Lynch, who 
also writes the show, is Ethel and 
Alan Bunche plays Albert. 



16 



to Coast 




Pert Betty Clooney now warbles 
as a regular for Robert Q. Lewis. 



Those Whiting Girls is the name of 
CBS-TV's brand-new show which 
will replace I Love Lucy on Monday 
nights dui-ing the warm months. It's 
a musical-variety half-hour, starring 
Margaret and Barbara WTiiting. 
This is the first time the sisters have 
worked together professionally. 

The energetic Sid Caesar will be 
his own summer replacement on 
NBC-TV — but as a producer, not as 
a performer. Sid's summer stint will 
star comedian Phil Foster as a bus 
driver, and will combine variety 
along with a story line. In the vocal 
spotlight will be baritone Bill Hayes, 
who was formerly featured on Your 
Show Of Shows, and Bobby Sher- 
wood will be the orchestra leader. 
Carl Reiner, a familiar performer on 
Caesar's Hour, will direct the hour- 
long proceedings which start Monday 
night. June 27. 

CBS Radio has come up with an 
ambitious new musical show called 
The Woolworth Hour, featuring 
Percy Faith's orchestra and chorus 
and Macdonald Carey as emcee. The 
theme of this Sunday-afternoon offer- 
ing is "What's New in Music," and 
will cover everything from Bach to 
ballet, swing to grand opera. Weekly 
guests wiU include leading personali- 
ties from the music world. 

Another new tune show which 
debuted on CBS Radio in April is 
Disk Derby, heard Tuesday through 
Friday nights and featuring strictly 
popular music. Fred Robbins is em- 
cee-disc jockey, and the Norman 
Paris Trio provides live musical ac- 
companiment for guest artists. On 
each show, Fred also plays brand- 
new recordings and the favorites are 
chosen by studio-audience applause. 
(Continued on page 20) 



How to make your life 
a bed of roses... 




7^ liilydd^/ee^^ j^ou,M<f 



i^-iLanu-eyU M^^ 7a^ (2<a. y^^MM/i^ 




(TUy 



cashmere bouquet 



Cashmere 
BouaueT 



59^29^ 



Plus Tax 




T 
V 
R 

17 



information bootii 



Success Story 

Would you give us some information 
about Carl Reiner, the "second banana" on 
Caesar's Hour ore NBC-TV? 

S.Q., Darien, Conn. 

"I started at $12 a week and, through 
my own ingenuity, hard work and per- 
serverance, I ended by making |8 a week." 
This is Carl Reiner's story of his brief 
business-world career following his gradu- 
ation from Evander Childs High School in 
New York. His show-business career is a 
more orthodox success story. After eight 
months of drama school, Carl, at 17, was 
acting opposite Virginia Gilmore in a 
little-theater group. ... In 1942, Carl 
went into the Army and was stationed in 
Hawaii when he auditioned for Maurice 
Evans, who was passing through with his 
G.I. version of "Hamlet." After the audi- 
tion, the company toured the South 
Pacific with Reiner-written revues and 
skits. . . . Out of the Army, Carl won a 
road company lead in "Call Me Mister," 
then appeared on Broadway in "In- 
side U.S.A." and "Alive and Kicking" — 
the latter being a musical on which Max 
Liebman did considerable work. When 
Liebman became producer-director of 
Your Show Of Shows, he remembered Carl 
and hired him. Then, when Caesar and 




Carl Reiner 



Coca got their own shows, Carl went 
along with Sid for Caesar's Hour. . . . 
Carl is married to the former Estelle Le- 
bost, an artist, and they live — with their 
two children, Robbie, 8, and Sylvia Anne, 
6 — in an apartment in New York. "The 
Bronx!" Carl says proudly. 

What's Up. Doc? 

/ would like to know about Richard 
Boone, ivho is host on NBC-TV's Medic. 
D.N., Moorhead, Minn. 

Richard Boone's first encounter with 
show business came after the war when 
he attended New York's Neighborhood 
Playhouse. Before that, the native Cali- 
fornian had been a boxer at Stanford 
University and the San Diego Army and 
Navy Academy, spent eighteen months in 
the oilfields, and operated a charter fish- 
ing craft. During the war, he served as a 
Navy air crewman. ... At the Playhouse, 
Richard became interested in modern 
dance and appeared in three terpsichorean 
productions. He performed in six new 
plays in New York and about 150 tele- 
vision shows before heading for Holly- 
wood. His film credits include "The Robe," 
"Violent Men," and "Dragnet." . . . Coin- 
cidentally, at the time Richard was play- 
ing the lead in Medic's pilot film, about 
a doctor performing a Caesarean section, 
his own wife was in a Santa Monica hos- 
pital giving birth to their first child, also 
by Caesarean. 

Sherlock Holmes 

Would you tell me about Ronald How- 
ard, who plays the title role in NBC-TV's 
Sherlock Holmes series? I love his "so 
very English" look. V.P., Kingston, N. Y. 

Star Ronald Howard and the Baker 
Street detective he portrays have several 
things in common. Both graduated from 
Cambridge University, where both began 
to play the violin for their own amuse- 
ment. Ronald, like Sherlock Holmes, col- 
lects books as a hobby and has the same 
charm and fine sense of humor as the 
famous detective. Unlike Holmes, Ronald 
Howard is married and has three children. 
. . . Born thirty-six years ago in London, 
England, Ronald was two years old when 



he was brought to the United States by his 
famed actor-father, the late Leslie How- 
ard. At ten, Ronald returned to England, 
and he has since shuttled between both 
countries. Before war broke out in 1939, 
he had worked as a journalist in England. 
He gave this up to join the Royal Navy 
for almost seven years and, after the war, 
resumed his theatrical career with the 
BBC television in London. Among the 
films he has appeared in are "Street Cor- 
ner," "Queen of Spades," "Dark Inter- 
lude" and "Glad Tidings." His favorite 
acting role was as Tom Wrench in the 
stage play, "Trewlaney of the Wells," and 
his future acting plans include devoting 
one full year to acting in Shakespearean 
roles with England's Old Vic Company. 

Familiar Voice 

/ seem to remember the voice of Verna 
Felton, who now appears on CBS-TV's 
December Bride, from many former radio 
programs. What roles did she play on 
radio? F.H.T., Levant, Me. 

On radio, Verna Felton was Dennis 
Day's mother and Red Skelton's grand- 
mother. The veteran character actress has 
also been the voice behind many Walt 
Disney creations and last season played 
Dean Bradley on Meet Mr. McNulty. 




Ronald Howard 




Patricia Wheel 



Doctor's Treat 

Would you give me some information 
on Patricia Wheel, who plays Peggy Regan 
on The Guiding Light, on CBS-TV and 
CBS Radio, and also stars on The Doctor's 
Wife over NBC Radio? 

W.D.F., New Orleans, La. 

Slender, dark-haired Patricia Wheel 
loves commuting between the hospitals 
on TV and radio, as a nurse in The Guid- 
ing Light and as a medic's spouse on The 
Doctor's Wife. In fact, Pat says, if she 
weren't already an actress, she'd enter 
nursing school. ... In private life. Pat is 
the newly-wed wife of Eric H. A. Teran. 
an industrial designer. She has been an 
actress for nine years — or since the age 
of fourteen, when she finished school. . . . 
Determined to be an actress. Pat spent 
four years, part of the time overseas, as 
an understudy and in summer stock. She 
broke into radio on a local station in her 
native New York. Her Broadway dream 
came true when she played opposite Jose 
Ferrer in "Cyrano" and with Maurice 
Evans in "The Browning Version." Her 
TV break was a part in an early serial. 

Calling All Fans 

The following clubs invite new mem- 
bers. If you are interested in joining, write 
to the address given — not to TV Radio 
Mirror. 

Steve Allen Fan Club, c/o Phyllis 
Myers, 21 Maxine PL, Akron 5, Ohio. 

Range Riders Fan Club (Jack Ma- 
honev and Dick Jones), c/o Joanne Col- 
lins. 3890 Bradley Rd.. Westlake, Ohio. 

Roy Rogers Fan Club, c/o Sharon Fili- 
pa, Rt. 2, Boyceville, Wis. 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION—If there's 
something you want to know about radio 
and television, write to Information Booth, 
TV Radio Mirror, 205 East 42nd St., New 
York 17, N. Y. We'll answer, if we can, 
provided your question is of general inter- 
est. Answers will appear in this column — 
but be sure to attach this box to your 
letter, and specify whether your question 
concerns radio or TV. 




ARE YOU REALLY LOVELY TO LOVE? 



Is there an air of freshness 
about you . . . always? 



A sweet, appealing air of freshness 
... is yours, always . . . when you use 
Fresh Cream Deodorant. 

Fresh keeps you free from embarrassing 
underarm odor and stains. Underarms are 
dry! For Fresh contains the most highly 
effective perspiration-checking ingredient 
now known to science. 

When you open the Fresh jar you'll 



discover ... its delicate fragrance ... its 
whiteness, its whipped cream smoothness. 
Not a trace of stickiness. Not a trace of 
greasiness. Gentle to skin, too. 

For an air of freshness use Fresh Cream 
Deodorant every day — be sure you are 
lovely to love, always. 

/^m4 



poiatmn AK 



is a registoiGd trademaik of Pharma-Craft Cor- 



nel distiihuted in Canada 



I ^^ed/) girl 

is alwa ys 
lovely to love 




19 



EVEN IF YOU 

BRUSH YOUR TEETH 

ONLY ONCE A DAY 

Colgate 

Dental Cream 
Gives The Surest 

Protection 
All Daylong! 




Brushing For Brushing, It's The Surest 
Protection Ever Offered By Any Tooth- 
paste! Because Only Colgate's— Of All 
Leading Toothpastes— Contains Gardol* 
To Guard Against Tooth Decay 
Longer— Stop Bad Breath Instantly! 



ASK YOUR DENTIST HOW 
OFTEN YOU SHOULD BRUSH 

YOUR TEETH ! But remember ! Even if you 
brush only once a day, Colgate Dental 
Cream gives the surest protection all day 
long ! Gardol, Colgate's wonderful new de- 
cay-fighter, forms an invisible shield around 
your teeth that won't rinse off or wear off 
all day! And Colgate's stops bad breath 
instantly in 7 out of 10 cases that originate 
in the mouth! Fights tooth decay 12 hours 
or more! Clinical tests showed the greatest 
reduction in decay in toothpaste history ! 



T 
V 
R 

20 




Colgate's TradeMark For Sodium 
N-LauroyI Sarcosinate. 



IT CLEANS YOUR BREATH 
It GUARDS YOUR TEETH! 



What's New from Coast 

(Continued -from page 17) 



Warner Brothers and the American 
Broadcasting Company have signed a 
long-term contract which calls for the 
Warners studios to produce a series of 
thirty-nine full-hour features solely for 
television. The weekly series will pre- 
miere on ABC-TV September 13 and will 
be based upon three full-length Warners 
movies — "King's Row," "Casablanca," and 
"Cheyenne." Members of the casts have 
not been announced as yet, but they will 
undoubtedly include some up-and-com- 
ing new personalities. 

The reactions to Arthur Godfrey's 
"mass firing," as it was called in broad- 
casting circles, have quieted down — at 
least for the time being. Marion Mar- 
lowe is happily fulfilling her contract 
with Ed Sullivan on Toast Of The Town; 
The Mariners are busy with their many 
concert dates; Haleloke is back in the 
Hawaiian Islands — or due to leave for 
there any minute; and Arthur's three 
dismissed writers are now working for 
Garry Moore. In the middle of all the 
rumpus, Carmel Quinn, the new Little 
Godfrey, announced that she had been 
married for two years to her manager. 
Bill Fuller, and that they have a baby 
daughter. (A complete story on Carmel 
can be found on page 52.) 

Meanwhile, a few predictions on the 
future status of Mr. Godfrey and his 
friends: Janette Davis will soon forsake 
her singing chores and will be assigned a 
production job on the Godfrey shows; 
Lu Ann Simms will not return to the 
Godfrey programs following the birth 
of her baby in September; and it's only 
a question of time before the McGuire 
Sisters and Frank Parker part company 
with Mr. G. . . . I could be wrong, but 
we'll see. 



Th 



IS n 



That: 



Songstress Betty Clooney has joined 
the Robert Q. Lewis cast as a regular 
member of his Monday-through-Friday 



TV show and will also be heard on Bob's 
radio program. Betty took over for Jaye 
P. Morgan, who left the Lewis levities to 
go on a personal-appearance tour. 

Dennis James and Old Gold Cigarettes 
have discontinued their partnership — at 
least for the time being — but it's strictly 
a friendly affair. Because he is so busy 
with his other shows and was doing only 
commercials for them, Dennis and Old 
Gold agreed to part company until this 
fall. Then, Old Gold plans to come up 
with a show of his own for Dennis, as 
they consider him one of the best sales- 
men they ever had. 

Eleanor Powell's West Coast show, 
Faith Of Our Children, may go network 
soon over ABC-TV. This popular re- 
ligious program for youngsters won an 
Elmmy Award for the former dancing 
star, and it would certainly be a welcome 
addition to the coast-to-coast TV 
schedule. 

Betty Johnson and Dick Noel have 
been signed as regular vocalists on Don 
McNeill's Breakfast Club. After Johnny 
Desmond and Eileen Parker left, Don ex- 
perimented with different singers every 
week, and has now chosen Betty and Dick 
for the permanent spots. 

Joan Alexander, of The Name's The 
Same, and her husband, Arthur Stanton, 
are beaming over the arrival of their first 
visit from the stork, a baby boy whom 
they have iiamed Adam. Joan also has an 
eight-year-old daughter, Jane, by a pre- 
vious marriage. 

Ralph Edwards knows where his pay- 
check is coming from, for at least the next 
five years. He has just signed an exclu- 
sive contract with NBC for his personal 
services and for the This Is Your Life 
series for that length of time. 

The sponsors of Mr. Peepers are drop- 
ping the show sometime this month, after 
three years of telecasting. Unfortunately, 
the ratings have been down, even though 
the show is still quite popular. Wally 




Liberace's name on the dotted line means he'll ploy the dramatic film 
role of a pianist in "Sincerely Yours" for Jack Warner of Warner Bros. 



rr 



to Coast 



Cox's futare plans are still indefinite at 
this point, but his producers plan to ex- 
periment with a change of format for him. 
Our Miss Brooks will be a full-length 
movie soon, with Eve Arden in the star 
role, of course. Production is set to start 
this summer, while her popular TV show 
is ofif the air. 

Steve Allen has added another accom- 
pUshment to his many talents — a book, 
called Steve Allen's Bop Fables, which is 
comprised of four bop -talk fairy tales: 
"Goldilocks and the Three Cool Bears," 
"Three Mixed-Up Little Pigs," "Crazy Red 
Riding Hood," and "Jack and the Real 
Flip Beanstalk." 

Mulling The Mail: 

B. B., Pomeroy, O.: Faye Emerson and 
Skiteh Henderson have no children of 
their own, though Faye has a son, Scoop, 
by her first marriage. . . . Mr. and 
Mrs. J. L., Cincinnati, O.: Rin Tin Tin, 
the dog star, does his own barking on the 
television show, which is filmed, but on 
the radio program, actor Frank Milano 
"imitates" Rin. . . . Mrs. J. J. M., Cheyenne, 
Wyo.: Les Paul's and Mary Ford's baby 
was born prematurely but, unfortunately, 
lived only a few days. . . . Mrs. H. E., Baby- 
lon, N. Y., and others who asked how to 
get tickets to TV and radio shows: TV 
Radio Mirror has no way of obtaining 
tickets for readers. The best way is to 
write in advance, directly to the show you 
want to see, or to the Ticket Department 
of the network or station broadcasting the 
program. . . . Miss Y. O'C, Memphis, 
Term.: You are right, Mary Martin's 
"Peter Pan" production will be repeated 
by NBC-TV, but not until the coming 
Christmas season. 

What Ever Happened To ... ? 

Pat Marshall, who until recently sang 
on the Tonight television show? Pat left 
the Steve Allen program in order to pre- 
pare a night-club act, which is presently 
being written for her, and she hopes to 
tour the country during the summer. 

Ransom Sherman, one-time popular 
emcee on the old Club Matinee radio sho'w 
and on many other programs? Ransom 
has been operating a magic-gag-gift shop 
in Hollywood and hasn't been active at 
all in radio. However, he is doing some 
TV film work, mainly spieling commer- 
cials, some of which he has already shot 
and which will be shown this fall. 

Walter O'Keefe, the well-known quiz- 
master and emcee, who last appeared as 
a simimer substitute on Two For The 
Money? Walter has been working on a 
new night-club act while living in Holly- 
wood, and recently tried it out in Cali- 
fornia. He hopes to play supper clubs 
soon and eventually wovdd Uke to do guest 
shots on TV. 



If you have a question about one of 
your favorite people or programs, or won- 
der what has happened to someone on 
radio or television, drop me a line: Miss 
Jill Warren, TV Radio Mirror, 205 East 
42 St., New York 17, N. Y., and I'll try my 
best to find out for you and put the in- 
formation in the column. Unfortunately, I 
don't have space to answer all questions, 
so I try to cover those personalities and 
shows about whom I receive the most in- 
quiries. Sorry, no personal answers, so 
please do not enclose stamped envelopes 
or postage, as they will not be returned. 




When an argument gets hectic, should you— 

n Tape record it Q Break it up Q Take the loser's side 



One man's politics (or ball club or disc 
collection) can often be another man's 
poison ivy ! So before either arguer blows 
his stack, take over. Shatter the chatter — 
tactfully. Maybe with music; or a funny 
story; anything to change the subject and 



save the party from bogging down. You can 
save yourself many an anxious moment at 
calendar time, as well. For when you choose 
Kotex*, you're getting the softness, safety, 
complete absorbency you need— to maintain 
your poise, your peace of mind. 




Quick >vay out of your hero's heart? 

I I Confess you can't cook Q Kiss and tell 

Q 8e o mombo maniac 

All those sweet nothings he whispered in 
her ear, last night ... all cancelled, in 
nothing flat! Why? Because today a com- 
plete playback reached his blushing ears ! 
Only a chrome dome babbles to her cronies. 
It's a fatal mistake. On certain days, you need 
make no mistakes about sanitary protection 
— not with Kotex. For this napkin can be 
worn on either side, safely; and you get 
special softness that holds its shape. 



Is the longer torso tine strictly for— 

I I Beanpole stature Q Chubby contours 

I I Little middles Q Laughs 

That long, lean midriff look — got it? Better 
get with it, especially if your competition's 
hand-span waisted! Do bending, stretching 
exercises that pull in your tummy. And of 
course avoiding greasy or gooey goodies can 
help whittle your middle. At "that" time, 
too (even in a slim skirted dress) you can meet 
all eyes serenely — what with Kotex and those 
flat pressed ends preventing telltale outlines. 
Try all 3 sizes of Kotex; learn which suits you. 



More women, choose KOTEX -than all other sanitary napkins 



Made for each other— Kotex and Kotex sani- 
tary belts — and made to keep you comfortable. 
Of strong, soft-stretch elastic, they're designed 
to prevent curling, cutting or twisting. So light- 
weight! And Kotex belts stay flat even after 
many washings. Buy two . . .for a change! 




"T. M. REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 



T 
V 
R 

21 




^*^w(«^/x4«^ 




T 
V 
R 

22 



Matching Talc and Toilet Water! 

. . . Co-Stars in the fragrance used 
by more women than any other in 
the world! Created to keep you 
delightfully cool all through the 
summer months, these Evening in 
Paris Co-Stars are available at 
cosmetic counters everywhere. 

for limited time only! 

BOURJOIS— Created in France . . . Made in U.S.A. 



Daytime Diary 



(Continued from page 11) 



her and his first wife, Judith. But Paul's 
furtiveness has worsened the entire situ- 
ation. Can his friends, CoUey and Grace 
Jordan, persuade him to tell the truth 
about the child of his first marriage before 
it is too late? And is Van far more re- 
sourceful than Paul — or Judith — realizes? 
CBS-TV. 

MA PERKINS All other activities go 
by the board as Ma concentrates on the 
tragic problem of Gladys and Joe — the 
problem made more tragic by Gladys' con- 
viction that their sickly httle daughter is 
in some way her fault, and that she has 
failed Joe as a wife. Can Ma solve the 
problem of restoring Gladys to mental and 
emotional health? Ma knows Joe's strength, 
but is he strong enough to face what may 
lie ahead? CBS Radio. 

OVR GAL SUNDAY Leslie Northurst's 
careful plan to win the Brinthrope title 
and estates from Lord Henry is so well 
organized that for a time it almost seems 
that the fraudulent claim may succeed. But 
at last Lord Henry feels he can combat 
Northurst's attack on his inherited posi- 
tion. Will he be as successful in mending 
the damage Northurst has done to his 
marriage with Sunday? Is Sunday justified 
in fearing the future? CBS Radio. 

PEPPER YOUNG'S FAMMLY In spite 
of the many weeks since Carter's disap- 
pearance, Peggy Young Trent cannot be- 
lieve that she will never see him again. 
Though the family feels perhaps a shade 
less conviction, they have not for a 
moment relaxed their efforts to track Car- 
ter down. But as each lead dies out in 
failure, it almost seems that a miracle will 
be needed if they are ever to trace him. 
Will they be too late? NBC Radio. 

PERRY MASON Though lawyer Perry 
Mason does not yet know it, the apparently 
simple case into which he was led by 
Lois Monahan has ramifications of tre- 
mendous importance. For Lois is not 
what she appears, nor is Eve Merriweather, 
who bears the name of the famous in- 
dustrialist Sam Merriweather as the re- 
sult of something that happened many 
years ago. Who and what is Eve — and 
what will it mean to Perry's investigation? 
CBS Radio. 

TUE RIGHT TO HAPPiNESS Fric- 
tion between Carolyn and her husband. 
Miles Nelson, increases despite his support 
of her during her trial. For Annette 
Thorpe still plans to mastermind Miles' 
political career and has not given up hope 
of taking charge of his personal life, as 
well. Her expert interference has brought 
Carolyn's marriage closer to the edge of 
dissolution than it has ever before been. 
NBC Radio. 

THE ROAD OF LIFE Sooner or later 
Dr. Jim Brent will find himself unable to 
continue with the pretense of affection he 
must show to Sybil Overton in order to 
save his wife, Jocelyn, from suffering from 
Sybil's carefully contrived plot. What will 
happen when Sybil realizes that Jim has 
been faking romantic interest in order to 
obtain the evidence he needs? Is her 
brother Hugh right in fearing that her 
mind may snap? CBS-TV and CBS Radio. 



THE ROMANCE OF HELEN TRENT 

Looking forward at last to the possibility of 
a future with Gil Whitney, Helen Trent is 
disturbed by the obvious effort Gil's secre- 
tary. Fay Granville, is making to attract 
him. And Brett Chapman, watching for 
every chance to patch up his own broken 
romance with Helen, may succeed in con- 
vincing her that she cannot possibly make 
the right decision concerning Gil. Will 
Helen turn to Brett once again? CBS 
Radio. 

ROSEMARY As a result of Bill's fight 
against the narcotics racket in Springdale, 
both he and Rosemary have received 
threats that have disturbed Bill more 
than he will admit. Rosemary, meanwhile, 
knows she is complicating life by her in- 
creasing attachment for little Betsy, niece 
of her neighbor, Diane Thompson. Jxist 
who and what is Betsy's father, Ray 
Calder? CBS Radio. 

SEARCH FOR TOMORROW When 
Nathan Walsh was defending her on a 
murder charge, nothing was further from 
Joanne's mind than that she and he would 
form parts of a triangle of which her 
fiance, Arthur Tate, is the third. Will 
Nathan be able to keep Arthur, his best 
friend, from learning how he feels about 
Joanne? Will Stu and Marge Bergman, in 
their affectionate efforts to help, make 
everything much worse before it's better? 
CBS-TV. 

SECOND HUSBAND The many prob- 
lems that beset a remarried widow are 
complicated for Diane Lockwood by the 
resentment her children feel for her hus- 
band, Wayne. Though Ted and Mimi love 
their mother and wish for her happiness, 
they cannot bring themselves to accept 
completely Wayne's position as their step- 
father. Will their jealousy and lack of 
cooperation be a serious handicap to this 
new marriage? CBS Radio. 

THE SECOND MRS. BURTON In or- 
der to provide his autocratic mother with 
interests that will take her mind off the 
Herald, so that he can run it as he sees 
fit, Stan Burton encourages his sister Mar- 
cia's plan to find a husband for the wealthy 
dowager. But when Buck Halliday turns 
up Stan fears they have jumped from the 
frying pan into the fire. Will Mother Bur- 
ton plight her troth with a hypocritical 
fortune-hunter? CBS Radio. 

THE SECRET STORM The hatred of 
his frustrated sister-in-law has finally 
trapped Peter Ames in a more serious 
dilemma than he believed she was capable 
of creating. With Pauline's social and 
financial influence turning the whole town 
against him, Peter's hopes for reinstating 
his good name seem dim indeed. But Joe 
Sullivan, the young reporter who is so 
much attracted to Peter's daughter Susan, 
has some ideas of his own. CBS-TV. 

STELLA DALLAS Stella is dehghted 
when her daughter Laurel and her son- 
in-law, Dick Grosvenor, patch up their 
marriage and go off on a second honey- 
moon. But the disastrous end to that 
honeymoon convinces Stella that the only 
way to save Laurel's happiness is to de- 
stroy the threat presented by wealthy Ada 



Dexter and her son, Stanley Warrick. Can 
Stella prove that Ada Dexter is insane? 
NBC Radio. 

THIS IS NORA BRAKE With the con- 
fession of Dan Welch that he murdered 
Fred Molina, Nora feels that her debt to 
the past is in some measure paid, and that 
now she must force herself to accept her 
doctor's advice and make new friends to 
take the place of her dead husband. David 
Brown is more than ready to aid in this 
project, but Nora soon realizes this young 
man is not quite what he seems. Will 
David's sister let Nora in on the mystery? 
CBS Radio. 

V.4I,f.4.VT LADY It was shock enough 
for Helen Emerson to learn that her love 
for Chris Kendall was hopeless because he 
had a wife in a mental home. More up- 
setting to both is the sudden news that 
Linda, long considered beyond recovery, 
has made such strides that she may be- 
come an out-patient. How will Chris 
make a home for his young son under 
these circumstances? How will Helen 
weather the shocking news from her 
daughter Diane? CBS-TV. 

W'JEiV»V' W ARHEiV AND THE NEWS 

Wendy's job as editor of her hometown 
paper is big enough to take up all her 
energies, but she cannot help finding time 
— more and more of it — for the charming 
Dr. Dalton and his even more beguiling 
little daughter Gretel. WiU Gretel's devo- 
tion to Wendy lead to great unhappiness 
for the child? Or does she suspect some- 
thing that the grownups are a long way 
from realizing? CBS Radio. 

WHEN A GIRL MARRIES The long, 
hard fight to defend Harry on a bribery 
charge gets off to a brave start, for Joan 
Davis cannot believe that anyone who 
knows her husband could imagine for a 
moment that he might be guilty. But 
gradually she and Harry learn the full ex- 
tent of the opposition and begin to suspect 
how far-reaching is the plan of which 
Harry has become one of the earliest vic- 
tims. How will they fight this unfamiliar 
enemy? ABC Radio. 

THE WOMAN IN MY HOUSE As 

Jessie Carter knows, bringing up a family 
requires a variety of talents. Over the 
years she has done a pretty good job of 
exercising them all. But perhaps the most 
important one has only been called upon 
since her children have grown up — the 
ability to point out to them when the time 
is right for them to stand on their own 
feet. Will she discover that some of them 
are not able to do it? NBC Radio. 

YOING DR. MALONE The one per- 
son in whom Jill Malone confides these 
days is David, and now that he is legally 
her adopted brother her father, Dr. Jerry 
Malone, hopes he will have even more in- 
fluence with her. For if someone doesn't 
change Jill's resentful attitude toward her 
stepmother, Tracey, there will be trouble, 
and Jerry feels helpless to avoid it. What 
happens when Jill inadvertently finds a 
weapon in Tracey's past? CBS Radio. 

YOUNG WIDDER BROWN Knowing 
that her husband, Dr. Anthony Loring, is 
still in love with Ellen Brown, whom she 
tricked him into jilting, Millicent Loring 
lays a complicated plan to discredit Ellen. 
But the plan backfires in such a way that 
Anthony himself is seriously involved, and 
in order to save her marriage Millicent 
finds herself working for Ellen's happiness 
by promoting her marriage to Michael 
Forsythe. NBC Radio. 



Get ready for summer with this 



spray net 

H if BRAND 




No other hair 

spray holds a wave 

in place so softly yet 

so surely ... no other hair 

spray manages your hair so 

naturally. And now laboratory 

tests show that Helene Curtis 

SPRAY NET is om hair spray that's never, never sticky. 

No wonder so many milUons of women insist on 

genuine Helene Cixrtis spray net. 

Now when you need spray net most (remember summer's 
wilting weather is aU but here) Helene Curtis brings you 
a spray net Special that takes care of all your hair care 
problems. Both hair spray and shampoo for only $1.25, 
plus tax. Don't wait another minute for your Bonus Package. 



CHOOSE THE ONE THAT'S 
RIGHT FOR YOU DURING THIS 



NOW IN TWO FABULOUS FORMULAS 

NEW SUPER SOFT SPRAY NET without lacquer, for 
gentle control. Created especially for baby-fine 
hair, casual hair-dos. 

REGULAR SPRAY NET, for thick, harder to manage 
hair, for more elaborate hair styles. The favorite 
of millions of women. 




Specr^l Offer 

WmO IT NOW..'. 

STOCKS Ak£ immDi 



•T.M.REQ.U.S.PAT.OFP* 



T 

V 
R 

23 



new 

bareness 
in bathing 

suits 





Tampax really is an old friend to millions 
of girls who throng the pools and beaches 
during the Summer. They've learned 
that no matter how scanty the bathing 
suit is, Tampax can't possibly "show." 
In fact (because Tampax isjnternal sani- 
tary protection), it doesn't absorb any 
water when you swim. 

Even without the boon of swimming, 
however, Tampax would still be the ideal 
hot weather protection. It does 
away with bulky, irritating, 
chafing pads, and substitutes 
pure surgical cotton . . . firmly 
stitched cotton that's so soft 
and comfortable, you can't even feel it 
when it's in place. 

Tampax has other advantages that 
make it appeal especially to fastidious 
women. There's no disposal problem, 
for example. Wearer's hands needn't 
even touch the Tampax during insertion 
or removal. And there's no odor problem! . . . 
Get your choice of 3 absorbency sizes of 
Tampax (Regular, Super, Junior) at any 
drug or notion counter. Month's supply 
goes into purse. Tampax Incorporated, 
Palmer, Mass. 



NO BELTS 
NO PINS 
NO PADS 
NO ODOR 



T 
V 
R 

24 




Invented by a doctor — 
now used by millions of women 




IVeKi^ Patterns 
for You 



9120 — Juniors: Note the flattering 
neckline, contrast inset in bodice, whirl- 
ing skirt, open-side jacket. Jr. Miss 
Sizes 11-17. Size 13 dress, 3% yards 
35-inch fabric; i/^ yard contrast; 
jacket 1 yard. 35^ 

4523 — Half-sizes: Keep cool in this 
easy-to-sew, easy-to-slip-into style. 
Cut to fit the shorter, fuller figure. 
Half Sizes UVi-^Wz- Size I6I/2 
takes 4% yards 35-inch fabric. 35«? 





9146 — It's a beachcoat for surf-time, an 
apron for clean-up time. See the big 
handy pockets, tabbed-to-nip waist- 
line. Misses' Sizes 12-20. Size 16 takes 
2% yards 35-in fabric. 35^' 



4523 

SIZES 
141/2-241/2 



Send thirty-five cents (in coins) for each pattern to: 
TV Radio Mirror, Pattern Department, P. O. Box 
137, Old Chelsea Station, New York 11, N. Y. Add 
five cents for each pattern for first-class mailing. 



mmtmmmwm 



FEATHER YOUR NEST 
Contest Winners 



HERE they are! The twenty-five 
lucky- — and clever — winners of 
TV Radio Mirror's exciting Feather 
Your Nest Contest, along with the 
prizes they won. Pictured below is the 
handsome grand prize — the Circle "D" 
living room. The Editors wish to 
thank those contestants who ex- 
pressed their enjoyment of the con- 
test — and of TV Radio Mirror. 



FIRST PRIZE 
Circle "D" Living Room 

Mrs. Bertha L. Bird, 16 Lexington Ave.. 
J^feedham Heights, Mass. 



24 RUNNERS-UP 
Morgan Jones Bedspread 

Mrs. John Jeskey, R.D. 1, 
Amsterdam, O. 

Mrs. Charles Lamich, 726 40th St., 
Kenosha, Wis. 

Mrs. Joseph Sobczak, 715 Wayne Ave., 
West Reading, Pa. 

Mrs. Gordon H. Smith, 32 E. Austin St., 
Duluth, Minn. 

Mrs. Frances Burns, 116 Oak St., 
Bath, Me. 

Eloise D. Greene, 2604 Indiana St., 
Topeka, Kans. 

Mrs. Stewart P. Crowell, 11 Mt. Vernon St., 
Reading, Mass. 

Mrs. Charles Godshall, 136 Branch St., 
Sellersville, Pa. 



Sight Light Floor Lamp 

Mrs. Virginia A. Hahn, R.D. 1, Kirk Rd., 
Canfield, O. 

Mrs. Richard Horr, Box 291, 
Monticello, Minn. 

Mrs. Kathleen Duncan, 3939 S. Delaware St., 
Englewood, Colo. 

Mrs. Anna Kutz, 2548 S. Bronson Ave., 
Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mrs. Ruth E. Rose, 517 Rollstone St., 
Fitchburg, Mass. 

Nona Weber, 909 W. Iowa St., 
Evansville, Ind. 

Mrs. William Mundhenk, R.F.D. 4, Box A34, 
Kingston, N. Y. 

Mrs. R. Probst, 2228 Kitley St., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 



16-Piece Stangl Ware Set 

Arnold Anderson, Jr., 336 N. 16th Ave., 
Phoenix, Ariz. 

Mrs. Fritz Schoeb, R.R. 2, 
Douglass, Kans. 

Marjorie H. Guiles, Mulberry Pt., 
Guilford, Conn. 

Mrs. Myrald Todd, 311 Christopher St., 
Warrensburg, Mo. 

Mrs. Margaret Brown, 143 Rutgers St.. 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Mrs. Orison M. Weaver, 640 Ada Dr., 
Ada, Mich. 

Mrs. Andrew K. Ramsey, Rte. 2, 
Lawrenceville Hwy., 
Tucker, Ga. 

Mrs. Donald Odom, 816 14th St., 
Onawa, Iowa. 




No other 
deodorant 



gives you 
so much... 









JUMBO 
SIZE 



^us tMc ^^ a}i5&]0 cenf stores 

• STOPS PERSPIRATION ODOR.... instantly 

• HANDY STICK FORM .... no mess, no waste 

• SURE PROTECTION, all day long 

• THRI FTY. . . . big stick lasts for months 

• GENTLE, HARMLESS to skin or clothes 

• DAINTY .... greaseless, never sticky 

• FRAGRANT and luxurious as a lipstick 



Wi 



nners 



ch 



oice: 



Circle "D" living room in sturdy ranch-style chestnut oak. 




T 
V 
R 

25 




WVEC-TV's Bob McAllister 
finds his greatest happiness 
in entertaining the young 
in years and young at heart 



Costumes of Faraway Places was just one of Bob's contests for his studio oudience. 



MASTER OF MAKE-BELIEVE 



26 



AT TWENTY, Robert C. McAllister is the sort of older 
brother any youngster might wish for. His head is 
filled with games, funny stories and magic tricks. He has 
a happy-go-lucky cowboy puppet named Chauncey 
DePue, who has a penchant for practical jokes. Another 
puppet, Seymore the Snake, lives in a basket, sings with 
Bob, Chauncey and their young friends, and changes 
the words of popular songs to include his favorite 
expression: "Yok, Yok." And Bob has just created a new 
puppet, Prunella the Plunger — a man-chasing spinster 
who will probably drive Chauncey to fulfill his pet threat: 
"I'll sock you right in the nose." . . . Happily for Virginia 
youngsters. Bob plays older brother-magician- 
ventriloquist-emcee on the Boh And Chauncey Show, 
seen weekdays at 6 P.M. on Station WVEC-TV. The show 
has a Western motif and more than 10,000 youngsters 
from the ages of three to fifteen belong to Bob's Ranch 
House Club. . . . Born June 2, 1935, in Philadelphia, Bob 
went to Granby High in Norfolk and then to the 
Richmond Professional School. His high school assembly 
programs led to appearances at charity affairs and then 
to professional dates. Bob's big break came during a visit 
to New York when he stood in front of the big window 
of the NBC-TV studio, where Today is televised, and 
casually chatted with Chauncey. Dave Garroway noticed 
the interest he was creating and invited Bob and 
Chauncey inside for a TV interview. Then, with the 
help of the people involved in the Today show, auditions 
were arranged for Ted Mack's Original Amateur Hour, 
where Bob and Chauncey became two-time winners. 
Next came a radio program on Richmond's WRVA and 
then, a year ago, their present show on WVEC-TV. . . . 
Bob lives quietly with his parents in a ranch-type home 
on Shenandoah Avenue in Norfolk. The house is filled 
with comic gadgets such as a squirting telephone, dribble 
glasses and ice cubes with bugs in them. Bob loves to 
amaze youngsters and oldsters with his magic tricks, 
double-talk and gimmicks, and visitors never fail to 
laugh when, with Bob's assistance, his cocker spaniel Taffy 
says "Hello" to them or suddenly declares, "I'm 
hungry!" . . . Vice-president of the Local Ring of Inter- 
national Brotherhood of Magicians and the Children's 
Magic Organization, Bob recently won a trophy for the 
"Best Comedy Magic and Ventriloquist Act" at the 
Convention of Magicians Alliance of Eastern States. From 
all indications, Bob's thousands of young viewers 
delightedly second the verdict of the professionals. 




Director Don Kreger and Bob confer with Seymore the 
Snake on the day's enchantment for their WVEC viewers. 




Bob hardly can get a word in edgewise as he relaxes 
at honne with Chauncey and his cocker spaniel Taffy. 




she's got 



(you can have it, tool) 



It's not so much beauty as it is personal vibrancy and sparkle, and all 
those indefinable qualities that make everyone instantly aware of her. 

For now there's a new lipstick that brings out all the vividness and sparkle of 
the real you with exciting colors that make you look and feel vividly alive. It's the 
new VIV lipstick by Toni. VIV's new High-Chroma Formula gives you the most 
vivid colors any woman has ever worn. Choose from six bright shades, each as 
sparkling as the Vivid Coral you see here. Try VIV, that vivid new lipstick by Toni. 
Comfortable, long-lasting and very, very vivid. 



new viv lipstick 
by 




fe^$] 



plus 

tax © The Gillette Co. 



at last! 







A LIQUID SHAMPOO 
thats EXTRA RICH f 



ITS LIQUID 



^ 



FOR 



Something wonderful hos 
happened — it's fabulous new 
Liquid Prell! The only shampoo 
in the world with this exciting, 
extra-rich formula! It bursts 
instantly into luxurious lather . . , 
rinses like lightning ... is 
so mild you could shampoo 
every day. And, oh, the look 
and feel of your hair after 
just one shampoo! So satin-y 
soft, so shiny bright, 
so obedient— why, it falls into 
place with just a flick of your 
comb! Shouldn't your hair have 
that 'Radiantly Alive' look? 
Try Liquid Prell this very night! 




JUST POUR IT ... 
and you'll see the glorious difference I 



Some liquid shampoos are 

too thin and watery . . . 

some too heavy, and contain an 

ingredient that leaves a dulling film. 

But Prell has a "just-right" 

consistency — it won't run and 

nexier leaves a dulling film. 




T-^ 



FREt-L— for 'Radiantly Alive' Hair 
now available 2 ways: 

Th e exciti ng, new extra-rich liquid 
in the handsome, easy-grip bottle I 

And the fa mous, handy tube 
that's ideal for children and 
the whole family . . . won't spill, 
drip, or break. It's 
concentrated — o\\x\<x for 
ounce it goes furtlierl 




A Family to Cherish 




Laurel Ann is the newesf lit+le Cummings — and were Bob and Mary glad she wasn't susceptible to nneasles! 



Four children in their home — plus 
one guiding rule of love — equals 
happiness for Bob and Mary Cummings 

By BUD GOODE 



BOB Cummings is a most unpredictable man. He be- 
gan life as a poor farm boy, son of a small-toWn 
doctor in Joplin, Missouri . . . and today he's in- 
ternationally famous as a star of many motion pictures 
and his own Boh Cummings Show over NBC -TV. He 
first wanted to become an aeronautical engineer, study- 
ing at Carnegie Tech . . . then suddenly found that he 
was an aspiring young actor, studying at the American 
Academy of Dramatic Arts. His public knows him best 



Sep Next Page 



29 



A Family to Cherish 



(Continued) 




Foreground 

"Emm " " 



iround: Sharon Patricia, Mary Melinda, Mar^ 
ly." Background: Bob — who brought "Emmy" 



iry — and 
Emmy" home. 




Bob Cummings gets far more attention from his young 
ones as a companionable father than as a famous actor. 




Professionally, os well as personally, Bob always values 
Mary's advice — particularly • when it comes to scripts. 



as a light-hearted comedian, in his regular TV role of 
happy-go-lucky Hollywood photographer Bob CoUins 
. . . but he won this year's "Emmy" Award from the 
Academy of Television Arts and Sciences for his pow- 
erful performance in a deadly serious drama, "Twelve 
Angry Men," on Studio One. 

Unpredictable as always, Bob appreciates this honor 
from the bottom of his heart, but talks about it in the 
typically light-hearted manner his public knows so well. 
"Up until now," he grins, "I've been the most successful 
failure in Hollywood — never on anybody's list or rec- 
ommended for anything. They used to say about me, 
'Oh, he's a nice fella, a pretty good actor' — ^Ijut that was 
all. So, when I got the telegram from the Academy an- 
noimcing my nomination for the award, I was flabber- 
gasted. And then to sit there the night oif the awards — 
and win — well, that was inconceivable!" 

Busy in Hollywood, Bob hadn't even been sure he 
wanted to take time off for the Studio One performance 
in New York. "It was a tough part," he recalls, "and I 
knew I'd really have to put myself out to do it. At that 
time, I looked on it as a 'one-shot.' It would probably 
cost me money to take the role. After all, I'd have to be 
in New York for ten days. And, by the time you travel 
back and forth, and pay the hotel biUs, there isn't much 
left from the check. 

"Then my wife, Mary, got hold of the script. 'It's 
good,' she said. 'It could be great. You've got to do it.' " 

Mary's encouragement means a lot to Bob, and he 
has never really shirked any opportunity to keep even 
busier than he already is. From childhood days on the 
Missouri farm, his philosophy (Continued on page 90) 



The Bob Cummings Show, over NBC-TV, Sun., 10:30 P.M. EDT, is 
sponsored by R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. for Winston Cigarettes. 



30 




Family stroll outside the house which Bob and Mary planned with such loving care for their children's protection. 
Safety first: They all leorn to swinn — and to drive. That's young Robert Cummings at the wheel of the miniature car,. 




¥^t'.^^^-;c 




Lovebirds: Peggy and her husband Knobby Lee with their pets, including "Mr. McGoo," the dog. Peggy and Knobby 
practice music together, but Knobby does the gardening — and both love that tomato sauce which started Peggy's success! 





^ma 



Peggy King rose from heartbreak and 
hardship to find her own Prince 
Charming — and The George Gobel Show 
By GORDON BUDGE 

HARD-BITTEN CYNICS may Sneer, "There aren't 
any Cinderellas nowadays," but this is 
one subject of which George Gobel 
himself would never say: "You can't hardly 
get them no more!" There's a real Cinderella, 
right on The George Gobel Show — his featured 
singer, Peggy King, just five-feet tall, red- 
haired, green-eyed, and prettier than even a 
fairy princess has a right to be. 

The original Cinderella used a pumpkin on her 
road to fame, and a glass slipper pointed her 
way to happiness. Peggy King used a can 
of tomato sauce, and it was her magic voice 
which opened the palace doors. But Cinderella 
and Peggy started out with two things very 
much in common: They were both poor — 
and they both believed in "dreaming beyond 
your means." {^Continued on page 80) 

The George Gobel 5/iotr. NBC-TV, three Saturdays out of four, 
10 P.M. EDT, is sponsored by Armour & Co. and Pet Milk Co. 




George Gobel hired Peggy for his show before they'd 
ever met, but it proved a happy decision for them both. 






Record fans: Trumpeter Knobby, of the Liberace band, chooses Harry James — but singer Peggy holds out for musical 
comedy. Below, right: Peggy with her parents, who had the loving faith (if not the money) to help her dreams come true. 




Live up to your Dreams 




Phonorama Time gets a royal welcome from Johnny's fans everywhere — like these eager autograph-seekers at Mary Louis 
Academy, Jamaica, N. Y. Gathered around the piano before that broadcast, left to right: Tommy LeonettI, singer; Anita Stenz 
and Barbara Lamberta; Johnny; Lois Thompson, Irene Lounzen, Annamarie Lamberta, and Bill Silbert, popular deejay of WABC. 




Above, some very special entertainment by Bill Silbert, Johnny, 
songstress Dolores Hawkins and Tommy Leonetti. At right, a personal 
interview by Jane Marik, student editor, at the Mary Louis Academy. 



Johnny Desmond learned — the hard 
way — how to be a guiding star 
to teenagers, on Phonorama Time 



34 





By HELEN BOLSTAD 

THE HIGH SCHOOL press Confer- 
ence was cool, hot or groovy, 
depending upon one's age, 
ear, or addiction to jive. By their 
eager questions, Philadelphia's 
teen-age reporters were letting 
Johnny Desmond know: "We dig 
you the most." And, by his 
frank answers, Johnny was 
retxirning the compliment. 

Speaking with that technical 
knowledge which makes so many 
young people music experts today, 
they talked of pop tunes and 
classics, LP's and hi-fi. They 
analyzed the styles of singers and 
sidemen. They exchanged 
opinions about what music busi- 
ness calls "r & b" — rhythm and 
blues — and about "c & w," which 
means "country and western." 

Things were rolling, man, 
rolling, for the moment was just 
right — ^at this historic conference — 
for these youthful reporters to 
share the achievement of a 
favorite star. On the previous 
Sunday, Johnny, cast in his first 



See Next Page 



Live up to your Dreams 




Phonoroma Time gets a royal welcome from Johnny's fans everywhere— like these eager autograph-seekers at Mary Louis 
Academy Jamaica, N. Y. Gathered around the piano before that broadcast, left to right: Tommy Leonetti, smger; Anita Menz 
and Barbara Lamberto; Johnny; Lois Thompson, Irene Lounzen, Annomarie Lamberto, and Bill Silbert, popular deepy ot WABC. 



Johnny Desmond learned — the hard 
way — how to be a guiding star 
to teenagers, on Phonorama Time 





Above, some very special entertainment by Bill Silbert, Johnny, 
songstress Dolores Hawkins and Tommy Leonetti. At right, a personal 
interview by Jane Morik, student editor, at the Mary Louis Academy. 




By HELEN BOLSTAD 

THE HIGH SCHOOL press Confer- 
ence was cool, hot or groovy, 
depending upon one's age, 
ear, or addiction to jive. By their 
eager questions, Philadelphia's 
teen-age reporters were letting 
Johnny Desmond know: "We dig 
you the most." And, by his 
frank answers, Johnny was 
returning the compliment. 

Speaking with that technical 
knowledge which makes so many 
young people music experts today, 
they talked of pop tunes and 
classics, LP's and hi-fi. They 
analyzed the styles of singers and 
sidemen. They exchanged 
opinions about what music busi- 
ness calls "r & b"— rhythm and 
blues — and about "c & w," which 
means "country and western." 

Things were rolling, man, 
rolling, for the moment was just 
right — at this historic conference — 
for these youthful reporters to 
share the achievement of a 
favorite star. On the previous 
Sunday, Johnny, cast in his first 

See Next Page ^ 








At 3, Johnny was just lis- 
tening to music — with love. 




Live up to your Dreams 



(Continued) 



straight dramatic role on Philco Television 
Playhouse, had introduced a new tune, 
"Play Me Hearts and Flowers." His Coral 
recording of it had been released on Mon- 
day morning and, at the end of the day, 
100,000 platters had been sold. By Friday, 
the total reached 250,000. Then, on that 
Saturday morning, just before their press 
conference, Johnny had launched his new 
disc-jockey show, Phonorama Time, on 
565 stations of the Mutual network. 

In view of such a week, one girl's ques- 
tion, "How do you get to be a success in 
music?" was to be expected. 

But the tone of Johnny's answer sur- 
prised them. With his feet planted firmly, 
his thumbs thrust into the pockets of his 
scarlet weskit and a rebellious lock of 
black hair falling down across his fore- 
head, he gave them a reply some young 
jazz fans would label "square." 

Playing it straight, he told them, "You 
get to be a good singer or a good Ameri- 
can or a good truck driver or a good any- 
thing else in just one way. You work at 
it. With discipline." 

Later, he had this comment: "Sure, I 
knew they hoped for a magic formula. 
Any kid does. When you're in high school, 
you want all your daydreams to come 
true instantly. The future seems like 
something which adults have locked be- 
hind iron bars. You look for something 
big and quick to make people notice you. 
You want the overnight success." 



He paced back and forth, his intensity 
mounting. "Well, I could have told them 
that, twice in my life, I've had the over- 
night success — and, both times, it cost me. 
It cost me a licking the first time, and the 
second time, I took a real beating. It took 
six years of hard work, plus wise coach- 
ing, before I recovered. But I learned. 
Man, how I learned." 

It was a story which Johnny had long 
kept to himself, but now, headed again 
toward important billing, he was at last 
ready to talk about it, out loud and for 
publication. 

"A kid," said Johnny, by way of intro- 
duction, "is three people: The child his 
parents think he is, the pupil the teacher 
sees — and, in his own mind, the person he 
wants to be with his own friends. Well, 
once in a while he gets tangled up. ..." 

For Johnny, such a tangle occurred back 
in Detroit. Eight years old and as cute as 
he was bright, he had already learned 
how to get his own way. He begged to 
study piano and, although the Depression 
had made the income from the DeSimone 
family grocery store slim, his father 
scrimped off the weekly fee for the 
teacher. 

Johnny made phenomenal progress. 
"He's practically a genius," his delighted 
teacher told his doting parents. 

But then came the day when Johnny 
refused to take his lesson. He also re- 
fused to say (Continued on -page 86) 



But, by 13, he was singing 
and acting "professionally." 



Johnny Desmond's Phonorama Time. Mutual, Sat., 11 :30 A.M. EDT, is sponsored by the Philco Corporation. 




Big day: Graduation from 
Northeastern H.S. In Detroit. 



Bob-O-Links: Eddie Levlne, Tony Paris, 
Johnny — and his "future," Ruth Keddlngton. 



Songbird in the sky: Johnny toured with 
the late Glenn Miller, in World War II. 



36 





Today, Johnny and Ruth have two little skylarks of their own — Patti, 6, and Diane, going on 9. 



Loyal honne folks: Brother Horry (right) and Mom — Johnny's grandfather (center) is mighty proud of him these 

who saw to it that Johnny kept at his music lessons. days — and so is Johnny's stepfather, Tony Buccalato (left). 





37 





The NAME'S The SAME 




Roger Price, Walter Slezak and Loraine Day aren't too surprised at the special ottention Audrey Meadows gets from 
Messrs. Elliott and Goulding on the TV panel program — Audrey's a sweet girl-graduate of previous Bob and Ray shows! 



Bob Elliott and family live in a city apartment and 
"go shopping" in picturesque Greenwich Village. 



Bob's hobby is painting — painting pictures good 
enough to be exhibited in New York City galleries. 



38 



Two moderators on a show, two minds 

on the track of laughs — they're 

still the "one-and-only" Bob and Ray 

By PETER CHARADE 

WOULD YOU LIKE to be 3 big-shot? . . . Now, at 
last, you can pull big jobs, be a person of 
means — the pillar of your community." ... If 
you happened to hear this come-on for a TV 
give-away, yoli know that it went on to describe 
the "Jim Dandy Burglar Kit," which included a 
mask, jimmies, crepe-soled shoes, canvas gloves, 
the plans of three banks, and "a list of aliases you 
can use over and tjver again" (including such 
names as Benjamin Franklin) . In fact, it was "the 
only complete burglar outfit offered today." 

To receive this and other "handy little kits," you 
were urged to write to "Thieves, NBC." And, 
each week, from 750 to 1000 hsteners sent in for 
the items. When the address was changed to "The 
Smithsonian Institute," that august establish- 
ment received some 300 letters asking for the 
"Home Surgery Kit — complete with instructions 
on how to take out your own tonsils." Only one 
htmdred himianitarians were interested in the 
Institute's "Kind Hunter's Kit — ^for soft-hearted 
people who love to hunt but hate to kill." It 
contained bullets, packed {Continued on page 75) 



The Names The Same, ABC-TV, Mon., 7 :30 P.M. EDT, is 
sponsored by the Ralslon Purina Co. Bob and Ray are also 
heard on WINS (New York), Mon. thru Sat., 6:30 to 10 A.M. 




Ray Goulding and family have a house on Long Island 
— which means rising at 4:30 A.M., a speedy breakfast, 
then off to the city for the Bob and Ray radio program. 





Ray's hobby is photography, and his favorite — and most 
willing — models are his wife and children. Left to right, 
below: Thomas, 6; Liz Soulding; Barbara, 3; Raymond, 9. 



Song fast: Bob and his wife Lee and the girls — 
Colony, 8, and Shannon, 5 — raise a little harmony. 




^pc^' 



/ 



It 








OfF TV, "Willy the lawyer" is a whiz of a homemaker. June cooks 
with skill — either plain or fancy — and does all her own decorating. 



This Life I Love 



As Willy on TV, as Mrs. William Spier at home. 



June Havoc has found her heaven-on-earth 



By MARTIN COHEN 



Husband Bill, the producer, brings supplies to his favorite chef. 




Author's note: If you're crazy 
about June Havoc, you'll like 
Willy — and if you aren't crazy 
about June, you're nuts. (End of a 
very sincere commercial — and start 
of a very honest story.) 

June Havoc, starring m the title role 
of CBS-TV's Willy, isn't just another 
w^oman, another actress, another show. 
She's great — and different. She is at once 
as sophisticated as a diamond bracelet 
and as elusive as a butterfly. 
She can be as frothy as an ice-cream 
soda and as hearty as a good steak. 
There are so many sides to June. She 
is so many people. Actually, she is 
basically shy. Or w^as. Or will be. You 
never know exactly. Once, she was 
shy because she was scared. Now, she 
can be scared without being shy. 

"I've never been as afraid of anjrthing 
as I am of this television show," she 
admits. In the past, making a success 
of something has always been a 
personal matter. (Continued on page 77) 



ITilly, on CBS-TV, Thurs., 10:30 P.M. EDT, is 
sponsored by General Mills and CBS-Columbia. 



41 



Album of DAVPRAMAS 

These exciting neighbors on NBC-TV are next-door 
to your heart, every weekday afternoon 




THE GREATEST GIFT 

WHEN she moved to the small town 
of Ridgton, Dr. Eve Allen took 
the biggest and most decisive 
step toward her life-long dream of 
becoming a general practitioner. There- 
tofore, her medical activities had been 
centered about laboratory work and, 
although she was acclaimed for having 
discovered the antidote to a virus 
which had killed her fiance, the glory 
of her accomplishment was dimmed 
in the light of her unrealized dream. 
Eve's settling in Ridgton, however, 
rekindled her fondest hopes, for at last 
she saw herself becoming the kind of 
doctor she had always wanted to be. 
But even the happiest occasions can 
be tinged with trouble, and Eve has 
found her situation is no exception. 
From the beginning she has had to 
fight the inherent prejudice against 
women doctors. And, since she finally 
won an appointment on the hospital's 
staff — though not without an intense 
and bitter struggle — her capabilities as 
a doctor, and as a woman, have been 
tested constantly. Obstacles, however, 
are nothing new to Eve; she has met 
and overcome many along her life's 
path. Although each one has left 
her with an invisible scar, they have 
also continued to make her life — and 
the lives of those she deals with — 
more meaningful and rewarding. 



The Greatest Gift, created by Adrian Samish, 
is seen over NBC-TV. M-F, at 3:30 P.M. EDT. 



In her battle against prejudice 
and selfishness, Eve Hunter (Anne 
Burr) has received invaluable 
help, comfort — and love — from 
Dr. Philip Stone (Phil Foster). 




CONCERNING MISS MARLOWE 



A LTHOUGH fame and fortune have always been 
a\ envied and sought after, they can prove to be 
poor substitutes for happiness and love — as ac- 
tress Maggie Marlowe knows only too well. Today, 
Maggie can look back on many successful years as a 
leading lady. But all the glamour and notoriety with 
which she has been showered have not been able to 
wash away the emptiness and unhappiness she has 
experienced. Now, Maggie yearns more than ever for 
love and the security of a happy home. . . . Twice in 
her life, Maggie has lost the one she loved: When 
she was a young girl, her husband died suddenly. 
More recently, tragedy struck when, on the eve of 
her marriage to Roger Anderson he, too, passed 
away. . . . Bitterly unhappy, Maggie decided to con- 
tinue on in the theater, finding her life once again 
filled with surprises and complications — especially 
since she met and fell in love with Jim Gavin, well- 
known international lawyer. Unhappily married to 
a woman who would not grant him a divorce, Jim 
became free to marry Maggie after the recent death 
of his wife. ... As she contemplates her marriage to 
Jim, Maggie's heart rejoices, for now, at long last, 
she is finding her dream of love and security becom- 
ing more of a reality with each passing day. 



Concerning Miss Marlowe is seen over NBC-TV, M-F, 3 :45 P.M. 
EDT, sponsored on alternate days by Tide (Procter & Gamble). 



Mangle Marlowe (Helen Shields) sees her dream of love 
about to come true with Jim Savin (Efrem Zimbalist, Jr.). 



I 



tr 



HAWKINS 
FALLS 




Good friends get together: Dr. Corey (Maurice Copeland) and his wife Lona (Bernardine Flynn) 
entertain Mitch Fredericks (Jim Bannon), Millie Flagle (Ros Twohey) and Sue Rig-ga (Toni Silman). 



» 



HAWKINS FALLS is a Small Midwestern town, located 
160 miles from a large city. It is a typical Ameri- 
can community, overflowing with the life, laughter 
and love of its proud residents. Anyone who has lived 
in a small town finds a special kinship with Hawkins 
Falls, for its people and activities mirror the life and 
ways of every Smalltown, U.S.A. . . . Particularly out- 
standing in Hawkins Falls are Lona and Floyd Corey, 
who usually find themselves in the center of the most 
interesting and exciting local activities. In a town as 
small as theirs, it is scarcely possible to keep a secret — 
at least, not for long. But, because he is a doctor, Floyd 



Corey has many times had to be a keeper of secrets. 
Consequently, he — and Lona — have been thrown into 
the midst of conflicts which have had both happy and 
tragic outcomes. . . . Although Lona and Floyd dearly 
love Hawkins Falls and all it stands for, the frequent 
difficulties they encovmter serve, not only as a lesson in 
life, but as a reminder that their town is not heaven — 
nor are its residents angels. But, after all, it is their 
town, their friends — and that's what makes it home . . . 
sweet, satisfying, and enriching. 

Hawkins Falls, written by Bill Barrett, NBC-TV, M-F, 4 P.M. EDT. 

See Next Page > 



43 




Working tirelessly wl+h Quentin Andrews (Frederic Downs) on the developnnent of a new jet engine, Zoch Jannes (Tod 
Andrews) is often ruthless, and his wife Laurie (Pat Barry) tries to tennper his over-zealousness with patience and tact. 



FIRST LOVE 



A NY PHASE of living, when pursued to an extreme, is 
J\ bound to create problems, as young Laurie James 
has learned in her marriage to Zach. When she be- 
came Zach's Wife, Lautie left behind the loving 
warmth and comforting security she had known with 
her parents, and ventured into a life of unpredicta- 
bility and possible insecurity. At first, love triumphed 
over all, and the waters of the James marriage flowed 
clear and smoothly. But ahead lay a deadly whirlpool, 
revolving about the Andrews Aeronautical Corporation 
and Zach's engineering jbb there, developing a new 
type of jet engine. . . . Zach is a man who is completely 
and wholeheartedly devotfed to his work and, although 
he loves Laurie, it seems that nothing can stand in the 
way of his profession. The results of his uncompro- 
mising attitude toward his work have often made Zach 



appear ruthless and heartless. His behavior has pro- 
vided many lessons in patience and understanding for 
Laurie and, the more insight she gains into his nature, 
the better she is able to help Zach by tempering his 
over-zealousness with prudence and restraint. . . . But 
there came a time when Zach's extreme single-minded- 
ness proved to be too much for Laurie and she left him. 
The separation was only temporary, however, and 
Laurie returned in time to stand beside Zach while he 
was being tried for a murder he did not commit. . . . 
Even though Zach's innocence is upheld, the air has not 
been entirely cleared of trouble. Many more turbulent 
seas will have to be crossed, but it seems now that they 
will be mastered with greater wisdom. For, although 
they still have far to go, Laurie and Zach have come 
a long way in learning to live and grow — together. 



First Love, written by Mdnya Starr, is seen over NBC-TV, M-F, 4:1.S P.M., EDT, for J ergens- Woodbury products and others. 



Album off DkVDRAMAS 



44 



{Continued) 



THE WORLD OF MR. SWEENEY 





Humorous surprises are usually in store for Mr. 
Sweeney (Charles Ruggles) when he starts problem- 
solving — especially when grandson Kippie (Slenr 
Walken) and his mother (Helen Wagner) ore involved. 



MAPUiTON could be anyone's home town — provided 
it is small and has a general store run by a beloved 
"cracker-barrel psychiatrist" like Cicero P. 
Sweeney. Although Mr. Sweeney has never set foot 
outside of Mapleton, he possesses an uncanny worldliness 
and wisdom that make him the townfolks' most sought- 
after adviser and dearest friend. As he lives each day, 
getting himself humorously involved in others' affairs, 
Mr. Sweeney's gentleness and charm provoke a delightful 
nostalgia which adds sunshine to the dullest day. 

Charlie Ruggles Tn T^eJForW Of Mr. Sweeney, NBC-TV, M-F, 4:30 
P.M. EDT. is sponsored by R. T. French Mustard and other products. 




In choosing a home, the Nelsons followed their hearts — and couldn't be happier. 

1'-,' 




I CAN REMEMBER the dreadful flu epidemic at the end of 
the first World War. I was about five then, and — except 
for my father — the only member of the family still on his 
feet. With hundreds of things to do, my father sat down 
for a talk with me. He explained that he had to go out 
for a whUe, and that made me the man of the house — in 
charge while he was gone. I have never been so proud. 
Here I was — head of the house at five, and during a time 
of real peril. The job was only temporary, but even so it 
just about fulfilled my dreams of glory." 

Continued ^ 



Since he was five, Herb Nelson 

has always sought his "brighter day" 

in the sunshine of his own home 

By ED MEYERSON 



Fonrjily life has always meant more than careers to Herb and his wife, Joan DeWeese. They enjoy remodeling their 
"new" house, and are thrilled with the extra play space for their children: Dawn Ley, Erika Joan, and baby DeWitt. 




46 



fl 





v^^ 




r^ 



m 



'^^ 



If: 






hi 


f ' r. ^ 


r^ 


M 


tl 


ii 



M 




1 



*-> V' 



■^ 




J 



H' 




A 



^N^;-V 






(Continued) 



It might be Max Canfield, that tower of strength in 
The Brighter Day, describing his own philosophy of Ufe. 
For, as a leading citizen of New Hope and editor of its 
newspaper, the Herald, in CBS's popular daytime drama, 
Max feels a strong sense of responsibility for the welfare 
of the entire community. 

Actually, however, it wasn't Max doing the remi- 
niscing, but Herb Nelson — who is Max Canfield on radio 
and TV. And, while there's nothing unusual about a 
healthy youngster in a happy family dreaming of glory 
in terms of. his own home, in real life Herb was 
to choose the one profession that makes such dreams 
the most diflficult to fulfill. What actor has ever been 
guaranteed a normal life, or even the security it takes 
to establish a home and family? 

But another childhood memory indicates the kind of 
actor Herb was to be: "So help me, I recall distinctly 
that, somewhere in my third year, a cousin or some- 
thing of my mother's — an impressive, bulbous gentle- 




Herb has more room to play, too, in their New Jersey 
home. A bit of "golf practice" can really build 
up an appetite for one of Joan's family-size steaks. 



man namied Sven Ring — ^paid us a visit. I took the floor 
and sang him a beguiling little ditty which was very 
well received. He forced a nickel on me." 

Which made Herb a professional actor, even at the 
age of three. He wasn't just posturing before a mirror 
or dreaming of one day being a star. He was actually 
putting on a performance good enough to get paid for 
it. And today, after twenty-four years in radio, TV, 
films and the theater. Herb is a professional in the finest 
sense of the word. He has all the security he needs. 
And as for that home and family. . . . 

"Well, it happened in New York," Herb recalls. "It 
was the first day of rehearsal of a new play. We were 
waiting for the leading lady to show up. Finally, I heard 
the smart click of heels coming down the long hall to 
the rehearsal room. Somiething about the rhythm told 
me this was the girl. It was." 

And so. Herb Nelson married Joan DeWeese. But if 
no one actor has ever been guaranteed a normal life, 
what about two actors? There is not only the problem 
of conflicting careers, but of keeping house with crazy 
hours and no possibility of a regular, scheduled exist- 
ence. To make matters more difficult, Joan came from 
a home in Mississippi where there had always been 
plenty of household help. She was an excellent artist, 
and she had studied drama under Maude Adams at 
Stevens and at the Yale Drama School, but no one had 
ever taught her how to boil an egg or wash a dish. 

And yet, some seven and a half years and three chil- 
dren later, the Nelsons have more than proved that 
they can successfully combine two theatrical careers 
with a normal, happy family life. 

How do they do it? Well, like all actors caught with- 
out a script, they improvise, feeling their way through 
a new situation until they know they've got it right. 
And, like all persons mature enough to know them- 
selves, they are content to he themselves. Their yard- 
stick has never been how other people live but how 
they themselves want to live. And, somehow, it's always 
come out right. 



48 




rr I 







ri I ' I 



■ 



£ £ £: £:£:- 



1 I i kr 






4^ 




Dawn Ley and Erilca Joan will also be enthusiastic honnemalcers someday, and are olreody practicing on miniature 
furnishings of their own. But even the biggest pieces of furniture can't dismay Herb, who does his own refinishing. 



Herb calls it "playing by ear," and cites examples to 
explain what he means: "When Joan and I were mar- 
ried, we had no plans except to set the time and the 
place. We let the rest of the arrangements work them- 
selves out, and as a result had a simple and beautiful 
ceremony much more memorable than anything we 
could have designed." 

He also recalls the way they bought their home last 
August. There was an ad in the newspaper describing 
a house for sale in Leonia, New Jersey. Shakespeare, 
wherefore art thou? it was headlined. "Oh, no!" Joan 
winced, but they went to look, anyway. Leonia was 
an ideal community for their purposes — ^just thirty-five 
minutes from Manhattan, with an excellent elementary 
school for the children. (Continued on pageSS) 



[ 



Herb Nelson is Max Canfield in The Brighter Day. M-F, on CBS-TV 
at 4 P.M. EDT— and M-F, on CBS Radio at 2:45 P.M. EDT— spon- 
sored by the Procter & Gamble Co. for Cheer and other products. 




49 




Sunlit waters at Miami Beach ore a perfect setting for Steve and Jayne to prove that two can be mighty good company. 




Steve Allen's show, Tonight, 
delayed his wedding trip 
with Jayne Meadows — then 
made up for it with a glorious 



The crowd grows: Above, J. Fred Muggs shows them three can be fun, 
too — just for Today. In the big group below, Tonight's Gene Rayburn 
is perched at left and maestro Skitch Henderson is behind Jayne. 




F 4^14^'* .-y 



SKH isu; 





Midnight telecasts starred such varied funmokers as Milton Berle — a playful porpoise — George DeWItt and Steve himself. 




By PHILIP CHAPMAN 

IN HIS BIG MANHATTAN APARTMENT On Park 
Avenue one bitterly cold evening this past 
winter, Steve Allen was going over his notes for 
the upcoming Tonight show and waiting for 
Jayne Meadows, his bride of a few months, to 
finish dressing. 

"I'm just putting on my face," she called from 
her dressing room. "I won't be a minute — " 

The phone at Steve's elbow rang. "Hello? What? 
You mean the whole show? For a week? I don't 
know. Who'll pick up the tab for the exti-a cable 
expenses? What about the plane fares?" 

Jayne came running in from her dressing room. 
"What— what — what?" she cried. "Take the 
show where for a week?" 

Steve covered the mouthpiece with his hand. 
'We're invited to go to Miami for a week, the 
whole outfit, and do Tonight from there." 

"Miami!" whispered Jayne, ecstatically. "Yes! The 
answer is yes!" 

Into the phone Steve said, "The answer's yes," 
and hung up. 

"Now tell me," he said to his bride, "why 
the answer's yes." 

"You wonderful dope, it's our honeymoon! 
The one we never had. We've been trying for 
three months to get a day or two free for our 
honeymoon, and here it is {Continued on page 83) 

Tonight, starring Steve Allen, is seen on NBC-TV, M-F, 11:30 
P.M. EDT, 11 P.M. CDT, under participating sponsorship. The 
Steve Allen Show is seen over WRCA-TV (New York), M-F, 
11 :15 P.M., for Knickerbocker Beer. Jayne Meadows is seen on 
Tve Got A Secret, CBS-TV, Wed., 9:30 P.M. EDT, as sponsored 
by the R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company for Winston Cigarettes. 




A tale of two redheads: Carmel of Ireland was discovered by Arthur of the Talent Scouts. 





Sure, 'tivcis the Little People 

gave Carmel Quinn the gift of song 

and made her a Little Godfrey! 

By FRANCES KISH 

THE LEPRECHAtJNS iTiust have been whisper- 
ing to her about things to come, 
because — all the time Carmel Quinn 
was growing up in Dublin — she used to 
imagine herself in America, singing and 
dancing for huge audiences. When her daddy 
and her two brothers and sister weren't 
around to hear, Carmel would go into the 
pantry of the big house where they all 
lived (her mother had passed away when 
she was only seven) and go through her whole 
repertoire of songs. If anyone caught her, 
singing and dancing alone in the freezing- 
cold room, Carmel was dreadfully embar- 
rassed, for this longing to sing and to entertain 
and to make people's faces Hght up with 
joy was a secret which — for a long, long 
time — she shared with no one. 

Not that she had to hide the fact that 
music was in her very heart, because all the 
Qiiinns understood that. They were all 
music-loving, and there was hardly an 




Writing to the homefolks bock on the Emerald 
Isle, Carmel finds her heart too full for words. 



See Next Page 



53 



(Continued) 




Between programs, Carmel shows Frank Parker and Tony Marvin How to "do it in jig time." 



3vening when the old organ wasn't giving off sonorous 
and beautiful hymns and delightfully lilting Irish 
melodies. Carmel's daddy is an excellent violinist, 
and some of the children would always be ready to 
accompany him on one of the other musical instru- 
ments they had around — everything from an accordion 
and mouth organ to quaint hand-fashioned instru- 
ments which had been in the family for years. And 
they would always sing, the men of the family in 
deep, rich voices, and Carmel and her sister Betty 
in high, sweet tones. 

"The neighbors used to think we had parties all the 
time, but it was only the Quinns enjoying themselves," 



she says of those wonderful family concerts of child- 
hood memory. "One of us would pick up an instru- 
ment, perhaps Daddy's violin, and he would say, 'No, 
you do it this way' — and, before you knew it, he 
would be playing and, suddenly, we were all crowd- 
ing into the little room." 

No one could have guessed then that this younger 
of the Quinn sisters would one day win a Talent 
Scouts contest on the other side of the vast Atlantic, 
with none of her homefolks there to witness her tri- 
umph, or to see her become one of the famous Little 
Godfreys. No one could have guessed that — in addi- 
tion to the television and radio {Continued on page 95) 



54 



Carmel Quinn sings on: Arthur Godfrey Time, CBS Radio, M-F, 10 A.M., and CBS-TV, M-Th, 10:30 A.M., under multiple sponsorship— 
Arthur Godfrey And His Friends, CBS-TV, Wed., 8 P.M., under sponsorship of The Toni Co., Pillsbury Mills, Frigidaire— and Arthur 
Godfrey\s Digest, CBS Radio, Fri., 8 P.M., under multiple sponsorship. Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts is simulcast over CBS-TV 
and CBS Radio, Mon., 8:30 P.M., under the alternate sponsorship of Thomas J. Lipton, Inc., and CBS-Columbia. (All times given EDT) 



[[^iB 





New World magic: On the great day honoring St. Patrick himself, Carmel gave a concert in fabled Carnegie Hall. And 
oh, the lovely things to be seen in the shops of New York! Then, during a Godfrey-show rehearsal break, the delight of 
listening as the McGuire Sisters — Dorothy, Christine and Phyllis — demonstrate those quaint folk songs of modern America. 




I 



time maglo €>r Ea-ln 



(Continued) 





Between programs, Carmei shows Frank Parker and Tony Marvin how to "do it in jig time." 



jvening when the old organ wasn't giving off sonorous 
and beautiful hymns and delightfully lilting Irish 
melodies. Carmel's daddy is an excellent violinist, 
and some of the children would always be ready to 
accompany him on one of the other musical instru- 
ments they had around — everything from an accordion 
and mouth organ to quaint hand -fashioned instru- 
ments which had been in the family for years. And 
they would always sing, the men of the family in 
deep, rich voices, and Carmei and her sister Betty 
in high, sweet tones. 

"The neighbors used to think we had parties all the 
time, but it was only the Quinns enjoying themselves," 



she says of those wonderful family concerts of child- 
hood memory. "One of us would pick up an instru- 
ment, perhaps Daddy's violin, and he would say, 'No, 
you do it this way' — and, before you knew it, he 
would be playing and, suddenly, we were all crowd- 
ing into the little room." 

No one could have guessed then that this younger 
of the Quinn sisters would one day win a Talent 
Scouts contest on the other side of the vast Atlantic, 
with none of her homefolks there to witness her tri- 
umph, or to see her become one of the famous Little 
Godfreys. No one could have guessed that^ — in addi- 
tion to the television and radio (Continued on page 95) 



Carmei Quinn sings on: Arthur Godfrey Time, CBS Radio, M-F. 10 A.M., and CBS-TV, M-Th, 10:30 A.M., under multiple sponsorship— 
Arthur Godjrey And His Friends, CBS-TV, Wed., 8 P.M., under sponsorsiiip of The Toni Co., Pillshury Mills, Fiigidaire-and Arthur 
Godfrey's Digest, CBS Radio, Fri., 8 P.M., under multiple sponsorsiiip. Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts is simulcast over CBS-TV 
and CBS Radio, Mon., 8:30 P.M., under the alternate sponsorship of Thomas J. Lipton, Inc., and CBS-Columbia. (All times given EDT) 



54 



New World mogic: On the great day hononng St. Patrick himself, Carmei gave a concert in fabled Carnegie Hall. And 
oh, the lovely things to be seen in the shops of New York! Then, during a Godfrey-show rehearsal break, the delight of 
listening as the McGuire Sisters— Dorothy, Christine and Phyllis— demonstrate those quoint folk songs of modern America. 




Never a dull moment 



Larry's wife Judy is a TV actress, son David and daughter Jay have vivid innaginations — and even the dog is full of tricks. 




Take Mrs. Lawrence Weber's word for it — Valiant Lady's 

Chris Kendall makes a very exciting husband! 



56 




By GREGORY MERWIN 

SOME OF THE THINGS to be Said about Lawrence Weber 
are obvious. He is six-feet-one, dark and handsome, 
with a scattering of prematurely gi'ay hair at the 
temples. His eyes are a dynamic brown and, when aimed 
at women, have an effect comparable to a brace of 
Buck Rogers disintegrator guns. Or so it has been said. 

"But not by me," Larry grins. "That's a lot of hokum." 

"It's not hokum," insists wife Judith. "I remember 
when we first met. It was like shaking hands with 
an earth tremor." 

They've been married since January 16, 1941. They have 
two blond and blue-eyed children, a home on Long Island 
and a tree which produced two apples last summer. Their 
garden, however, is one of the most beautiful in 
Valley Stream — thanks to Laixy's back. 

"I spaded the front lawn in three (Continued on page 93) 

Lawrence Weber is Chris Kendall in Valiant Lady, as seen on CBS-TV. 
M-F, 12 noon EDT, sponsored by General Mills, Inc., and The Toni Co. 



There's nothing "actorish" about the Webers' 
ranch house. And Larry plays ball with Jay like 
any suburban father after a doy's work in town. 




Reading Is on old delight to Larry, a new world of discovery lying ahead for Jay and David as they set out for school. 





Mitii Green is a very proud mother, I can tell you! Here I am, parading just outside our house, with my four little 
"J's" — left to right, Jay, Jeff, Jon and Joel. There's also a fifth "J" bouncing along beside us — Junior, our dog. 



Recognize this typical schedule? Homework with Jan — naptime for Joy (then Jeff) — after-school snack for Jan and 

7" ^ . ■ 



Joel. 




So This Is Hollywood 



I've been here before. But now 

I'm back, with Joe and our babies, and 

know how right my grandmother was! 

By MITZI GREEN 

Mrrzi, CHILD," my grandmother said to me one day, 
"there may be times when we don't understand why 
certain things happen. But remember: They 
always happen for the best!" 

As a child, those words didn't mean much to me. But 
today they have become almost a philosophy of life. In 
fact, they had a very special meaning on three of the 
most important days of my life: The day I signed my first 
Paramount Pictures contract. The day I signed my first 
television contract as the star of So This Is Hollywood. 
And the day I first met Joe Pevney. 

I met Joe in the summer of '39. I had gone to 
Ivoryton, Connecticut, for summer stock, and had looked 
forward to a pleasant combination summer work- 
vacation. But, the first day there, it seemed as if everything 
were going wrong and I was in for a summer of misery. 

First, I met a most irritating young man who didn't 
think I was right for the part of the (Continued on page 88) 



So This Is Hollywood is seen on NBC-TV, Sat., 8:30 P.M. EDT, for 
Viv Lipstick. Deep Magic Cream, Bobbi Home Permanents, and Pamper. 





Before even looking at a script with Virginia 
Gibson and producer Edmund Beloin, I know I'll 
see plenty of oc+ion in So This Is Hollywood. 




Curls were n^.y childhood idea of movie glamour 
when I played Becky Thatcher and Jackie Coogan 
was Tom Sawyer (above). Today, I find that just 
being with my husband Joe — even when he's 
fishing (left) — beats all the glamour in the world. 



59 




For Cathleen Cordell, it proved to be 
her homeland of America and the 
very human drama of Second Husband 

By MARY TEMPLE 




Cathleen's bachelor-girl apartment is a single room, but 
boasts a private terrace and a compact refrigerator (right). 



Cathleen is Diane Lockwood in Second Husband, CBS Radio, M-F, 
11:45 A.M. EDT. She is Millicent Loring in Young Widder Brown, 
NBC Radio, M-F, 4:30 P.M. EDT, for ihillips' Milk of Magnesia, 
Bayer Aspirin, Prom Home Permanent, White Rain, other products. 



IISTENING TO Second Husband, on CBS 
J Radio, no one can doubt that Cathleen 
Cordell, who plays Diane Lockwood, is 
a girl of vivid personality. It spills over 
into the microphone, although listeners cannot 
see the vivacity of her face when she speaks, 
the shimmer of gold-red hair, the greenish- 
blue eyes, long slim legs and slender figure. 
. . . Cathleen's beauty is a mixture of 
American-Irish-English ancestry. She was 
born Kathleen (spelled then with a K but 
now changed to a C) Kelly, in Brooklyn. And 
she is the first of her family, as far back 
as she knows, to become an actress. 

Cathleen is a girl of contradictions, of 
unexpected and interesting opposites. A glam- 
orous woman who loves all the luxuries of 
life and yet adores working and can't 
imagine not being busy at something all the 
time . . . working hard, too, and putting 
her whole heart into it. A girl who wears 
simple clothes with elegance and elegant 
clothes with simplicity . . . who has lived in 
many foreign countries — India, France, 
England — and is at home practically any- 
where in the world, yet brings a distinction of 
her own to a bachelor-girl, one-room hotel- 
apartment in New York. A girl who loves 
parties and fun, dining (Continued on page 69) 



60 





Her stage career has been on exciting one, both here ond in Englond, but Cothleen oppreciotes the rare leisure which 
acting in daytime dramas has given her. There's time now to relax at home, reading or listening to the radio — to play 
with "Maya," pampered pet of the neighborhood — to dress for a date, knowing the whole evening is free just to have fun. 




61 



This Is Nora Drake 




1. Stunned and heartsick over the death of her husband, Nora Drake avoids a breakdown by working to bring his murderers 
to justice. Then Nora begins to pick up the threads of normal life once again— and, at a party, meets publisher Alan Miller. 



62 



i 



I ( 




2. When Nora accepts an invitation to the Miller home, she hordly expects to stumble on on argument 
in which Alon angrily warns his wife Diana: "Stay away from that man. Stay away from David Brown!" 



IiFE CATCHES US Up in its activities, Nora Drake 
■ mused, calling us with a strident, insistent 
voice to come out of ourselves and meet its de- 
mands. This was a blessing, she knew, for only 
by catching up the threads of her life once again 
had she avoided the despair which had almost 
consumed her when Fred Molina died so tragi- 
cally. . . . Nora's few months of marriage to Fred 
had been the happiest she had ever known. But, 
even before their marriage, Fred had been threat- 
ened by the underworld Syndicate run by Lee 
King and Dan Welch. Together, Fred and Nora 
had tried to destroy the Syndicate, and had even- 
tually succeeded — at the cost of Fred's own life. 
. . . Heartsick, Nora had determined to bring 
Fred's murderers to justice. Eventually, Dan 



Welch had confessed, and Lee King — in trying to 
escape from justice — had been killed in an auto- 
mobile accident. Only Wynne Robinson — the 
wealthy, attractive socialite who had aided Welch 
and King — had avoided trial by fleeing to Europe. 
But Wynne doesn't escape punishment — for, when 
she arrives in Marseilles, she is penniless, and 
her once-glamorous life is no more. . . . With these 
tragic events now in the past, Nora sets about 
starting a new life. She throws herself into her 
work as a hospital nurse, which helps ease the 
pain in her heai't. David Brown, the crime re- 
porter who has become Nora's friend, also helps 
her find new interests. He persuades Nora to 
attend a party where she meets his pubUsher, 
Alan Miller. Invited to Miller's home, Nora meets 



See Next Page 



63 



I 



This Is Nora Drake 




1. Stunned ond heartsick over the death of her husbonri Nr,r^ n L -i , . ,Af 

to justice. Then Nora beqins to pick up the thread of norSf °"°"^' ° breakdown by working to bring h,s murd 

p tne threads of normol l,fe once ogoin-ond, ot a porty, meets publisher Alon M' 



'dere's 

lille'- 



62 




2. When Nora accepts an invitation to the Miller home, she hardly expects td stumble on on argument 
in which Alan angrily warns his wife Diano; "Stay away from that man. Stay oway from David Brown!" 



La"E CATCHES US Up in its activities, Nora Drake 
■ mused, calling us with a strident, insistent 
voice to come out of ourselves and meet its de- 
mands. This was a blessing, she knew, for only 
by catching up the threads of her life once again 
had she avoided the despair which had almost 
consumed her when Fred Molina died so tragi- 
cally. . . . Nora's few months of marriage to Fred 
had been the happiest she had ever known. But, 
even before their marriage, Fred had been threat- 
ened by the underworld Syndicate run by Lee 
King and Dan Welch. Together, Fred and Nora 
had tried to destroy the Syndicate, and had even- 
tually succeeded — at the cost of Fred's own life. 
. . . Heartsick, Nora had determined to bring 
Fred's murderers to justice. Eventually, Dan 



Welch had confessed, and Lee King — in trying to 
escape from justice — had been killed in an auto- 
mobile accident. Only Wynne Robinson — the 
wealthy, attractive socialite who had aided Welch 
and King — had avoided trial by fleeing to Europe. 
But Wynne doesn't escape punishment — for, when 
she arrives in Marseilles, she is penniless, and 
her once-glamorous life is no more. . . . With these 
tragic events now in the past, Nora sets about 
starting a new life. She throws herself into her 
work as a hospital nurse, which helps ease the 
pain in her heart. David Brown, the crime re- 
porter who has become Nora's friend, also helps 
her find new interests. He persuades Nora to 
attend a party where she meets his publisher, 
Alan Miller. Invited to Miller's home, Nora meets 



See Next Page 



This Is Nora Drake 



{Continued) 





3. Reporter David Brown, now Nora's -friend, is assigned 
to a big story and works with Detective Ca'udill (left) to 
track down the murderer who scrawls this strange message. 



4. Meanwhile, Wynne Robinson, the socialite involved with 
the Syndicate that murdered Fred, flees to Europe and 
meets punishment as she arrives penniless in a strange land. 



his wife, Diana — and later overhears a quarrel between 
Alan and Diana. "Stay away from that man," Alan 
warns. "Stay away from David!" Puzzled, Nora won- 
ders: What is Diana's interest in David? And what is 
it about David that makes Alan warn his wife? . . . Al- 
though both Alan and David's parents feel David shovdd 
switch to writing editorials, David insists upon remain- 
ing a crime reporter. Mr. and Mrs. Brown are frankly 
worried about David, and Nora wonders what lies be- 



Piclured here, as heard on the air, are: 

Nora Drake Joan Tompkins 

David Brown Michael Kane 

Alan Miller Craig McDonnell 

Wynne Rohinson Claudia Morgan 

Detective Charles Caudill Paul McGrath 

This /,- A'ora Drake is heard over CBS Radio, M-F, 2:30 P.M. 
F,1)T, sponsored Ijy The Toni Company and Bristol-Myers Company. 



hind Mrs. Brown's anxious remark: "If David goes on 
as a crime reporter, he may find out the truth about 
himself." . . . Currently, David has been working on the 
case of a series of shocking murders which have com- 
pletely baffled the police — particularly because, near the 
body of each victim, the murderer has written: "Please 
stop me before I kill again." ... In tracking down every 
lead, David's trail of clues takes him to the hospital and 
one of Nora's new patients, John Dallas, who has shown 
definite signs of being mentally disturbed. David sus- 
pects Dallas is the psychopathic murderer, and seeks 
information about him from Nora. When — true to medi- 
cail ethics — Nora denies David's i-equest, they argue 
sharply. . . . But — if David is right, is there danger in 
Nora's workaday contacts with John Dallas? And what 
about David himself? What is the mysterious "truth" 
Mrs. Brown fears her son may discover? . . . As Nora 
Drake becomes more absorbed in her new life, is there 
a chance that in time she will find new happiness, to 
replace the love she has lost? And, even if the future 
may hold brighter promises, will it also reveal even 
greater danger than Nora has ever known before? 



64 





5. David's hunt for the psychopathic killer leads to a patient under Nora's care. David demands that 
Nora allow him to question the mon and, when she insists on guarding her patient, they quarrel sharply. 
David's concern is over more than a newspaper headline. If his guess is right, Is Nora In serious danger? 



65 





I 



64 



This Is Mom Drake 

(Continued) 




3. Reporter David Brown, now Nora's friend, is assigned 
to a big story and works with Detective Coudill (left) to 
track down the murderer who scrawls this strange message. 



his wife, Diana — and later overhears a quarrel between 
Alan and Diana. "Stay away from that man," Alan 
warns. "Stay away from David!" Puzzled, Nora won- 
ders: What is Diona's interest in David? And what is 
it about David that makes Alan warn his wife? . . . Al- 
though both Alan and David's parents feel David should 
switch to writing editorials, David insists upon remain- 
ing a crime reporter. Mr. and Mrs. Brown are frankly 
worried about David, and Nora wonders what lies be- 



Picluied here, a« heiird on the air. are: 

'^»"^'"'"= Joan Tompkins 

David Brown Michael Kane 

*'"" *""" Craig McDonnell 

Wynne Robinson Claudia Morgan 

Detective Charles CaudiU p„„, McGrath 

Uhls Nora Orate is heard over CBS Radio, MF, 2:30 PM 
E1)T, sponsored by The Ton. Company and Bristol-Mye^s Compan'; 



64 



4. Meanwhile, Wynne Robinson, the socialite involved with 
the Syndicate that murdered Fred, flees to Europe and 
meets punishment as she arrives penniless in a strange land. 



hind Mrs. Brown's anxious remark: "If David goes on 
as a crime reporter, he may find out the truth about 
himself." . . . Currently, David has been working on the 
case of a series of shocking murders which have com- 
pletely baffled the police — particularly because, near the 
body of each victim, the murderer has written: "Please 
stop me before I kill again." ... In tracking down every 
lead, David's trail of clues takes him to the hospital and 
one of Nora's new patients, John Dallas, who has shown 
definite signs of being mentally disturbed. David sus- 
pects Dallas is the psychopathic murderer, and seeks 
mfoi-mation about him from Nora. When— true to medi- 
cal ethics— Nora denies David's request, they argue 
sharply. . . . But-if David is right, is there danger m 
JNora s workaday contacts with John Dallas? And what 
about David himself? What is the mysterious "trutb 
Mrs Brown fears her son may discover? . . . As- Nora 
i^rake becomes more absorbed in her new life, is there 
a chance that in time she wUl find new happiness, to 
replace the love she has lost? And, even if the future 
may hold brighter promises, will it also reveal even 
greater danger than Nora has ever known before? 



I _^A 


•^ 


^^^^^^ifiifl 




,.-.„^ 




5. David's hunt for the psychopathic killer leads to a patient under Nora's care. David demands thot 
Nora allow him to question the man and, when she insists on guarding her patient, they quarrel sharply. 
David's concern is over more than a newspaper headline. If his guess is right, is Nora in serious danger? 



65 



THE LONG lATAY HOME 






A 



hi- 




Tom had known from teen-doys that marriage to "Bo" would be his dream of happiness. 



The truth about Tom Moore's marriage 
— and re-marriage — is as old as time, 
as new as mans first love for woman 

By HAROLD KEENE 



TOM MOORE stood at the water's edge in Cypress 
Gardens, Florida, staring out across the 
mirror-like surface to the far vista of fiower- 
hiing trees and deep green hammocks. A speed- 
boat towing a pair of water skiers, a boy and a 
lovely girl, sped past, but Tom's eyes didn't move 
to follow them. In fact, he wasn't even seeing the 
water or the glamorous setting. 

Instead, strangely, he was watching himself as 
a younger man back in 1939, not gray-haired 
then, but certainly gray of face as he paced the 
hospital corridors waiting for Bo to have their 
baby. They'd been married six years, by then, 
and this was to be their first and — as it turned 
out — only child. And when at last he'd been 
allowed to go in to her, and she had told him 
wearily but triumphantly that she'd given him 
a son, it had seemed to him that he had achieved 
the greatest happiness a man could know. 

Yet, twelve years later, he and Bo had been 




His mother and Bo were proud of his success in 
Chicago — but that early fame brought heartbreak. 



Florida Calling With Tom Moore is heard on Mutual, M-F, 
11 A.M. EDT, for the Florida Citrus Commission. Tom also 
emcees True Or False, on Mutual, Sat., 8 P.M. EDT. 



See Next Page 



► 



67 



THE LONG IVAir HOM[E 



(Continued) 



divorced. Now, tonight, when he returned to the gay 
stucco bungalow in near-by Winter Haven, it would be 
to a different girl, the pretty and charming Willie Lou, 
whom he had married shortly after he and Bo had parted. 
Now Tom, Jr., sixteen and already six-foot-three, was in 
a miUtary school up North — and Bo was alone, he sup- 
posed, in their old house in Northfield, Illinois, and — well, 
Tom Moore was a confused and unhappy man. 

He knew that, when he walked into his bungalow in 
another hour or two, Lou would be waiting for him, as 
she always had during the more than three years of 
their marriage. She would have done everything possible 
to arrange for his comfort and convenience, and she 
would be ready with laughter, or understanding, or pa- 
tient silence. She was a grand girl, and a good wife. 

But there was a loneliness in Tom's heart, a need that 
only one woman could fill, and that woman was Bo. 
Tom had known it for a long time. At first he had tried 
to deny the knowledge, forget it, put it out of his mind. 
It was a good try, but it couldn't work, because Bo had 
been a part of him too long, their love too much a part 
of Tom's entire adult life. . . . 

So it was that, when I talked with Tom in Winter 
Haven, not long ago, he dropped a bombshell in front of 
me and nearly knocked my ears off. I had known him 
only during recent years, since his Ladies Fair show had 
moved to Florida. During that time he had seemed to be 
immensely happy with Lou, especially during the weeks 
when young Tom could be with them. Then they had 
given the outward appearance of a perfect family group 
— smiling and busy, active in sports, completely devoted. 

I said to Tom, "I know we ran a story about you and 



Lou only a httle over six months ago, but your fans are 
screaming for more." And I added, innocently enough, 
"Anything important happen recently?" 

Tom is nothing if not direct. "Yes. Lou and I have 
arranged for a divorce, and Bo and I are going to be 
re-married. In the same little church where we were 
first married in 1933, with the same minister officiating. 
We're only waiting till summer because then our son will 
be out of military school and can stand up with us." 

When I had regained my voice, I said one word: 
"Why?" 

He answered, simply, "Because I want to go home." 

The story of Tom and Bo and Lou, and of the almost 
tragic mistake in which all three were involved — as Tom 
told it to me that afternoon — has had its counterpart in 
so many American homes that almost any person can 
understand some of the emotional turmoil of each of 
these thoroughly nice, very human beings. This is no 
casual Hollywood-type scenario of marriage, divorce, and 
reconciliation. 

Tom, Bo, and Lou are people like you and me, trying 
to do their best, making mistakes, working hard at the 
pursuit of elusive happiness, and often, in the words of 
Thoreau, leading "lives of quiet desperation." We know 
them. They are our neighbors, they are ourselves. 

Well, maybe Tom represents an exception, in that he 
was born in a trunk in the dressing room of his vaude- 
ville parents, while they were touring a circuit. That 
meant that he grew up in show business and that his 
conception of home life was, even into his adolescence, 
a hopping succession of moves from one town to another. 
Seemed perfectly normal to a (Continued on page 92) 



Three make a family. Bo and Tom want to be together, watching Tom, Jr. grow up, whether in the Midwest or Florida. 




^; ,-'^/^r^r ;;i-^r''>. '-^ :n''^: 




I 



Where the Heart 
Belongs 

{Continued from page 60) 
out in good restaurants in good company, 
going to the races, travel . . . and yet is 
perfectly content to stay home alone many 
evenings and to read, or listen to the radio. 

Even her tastes in food are contradic- 
tory. Since her parents took her overseas 
when she was only five fher father was 
an engineer whose work sent him to many 
parts of the world), Cathleen has been 
exposed to all varieties of foreign cooking, 
and she now lives in a part of New York 
that is honeycombed with fine restaurants. 
Yet the little refrigerator in her apartment 
(disguised to look like a modem- design 
TV set because it has to be out in plain 
sight) holds only such things as cottage 
cheese and salad, gelatin and fruit, milk 
and eggs. And the waiters at the Stork, 
"21" and similar spots will tell you that 
their orders for exotic dishes never come 
from Miss Cordell. ("I really like burnt 
toast, cake when it's a little stale, and 
overdone omelets," she says.) 

She's a pushover for biographical books 
but doesn't care at all for books written 
about the theater: "It's odd, I suppose, but 
I don't." She was a "reader" for several 
London publishers when she was quite 
young, combining one of her favorite 
pastimes with some extra money to live 
on while she was learning her way about 
the theater. 

Word games, like Scrabble, fascinate her, 
but figures frighten her. "I really can't 
add at all, and if it were not for my won- 
derful mother, who helps me with my 
accounts, I wouldn't know what was hap- 
pening to my money. She sees that I in- 
vest some of it, and she keeps all the ac- 
counts straight." 

Travel still beckons to Cathleen, but she 
has had to remain in New York the 
past three summers, and this one promises 
to be no exception. Friends with winter 
homes in sunny climes urge her to join 
them in winter. Friends with homes at 
the shore ask her out for summer week- 
ends. But, because of her work, Cathleen 
has found it easier to settle for some com- 
fortable lounging chairs on her outdoor 
terrace high above a street in the East 
Fifties, a terrace planted with greenery 
and flowers and made gay with bright 
cushions. 

She loves animals, especially dogs, but 
because of her busy life she has had to 
compromise for a place in the affections 
of a beautiful tawny boxer named Maya, 
who belongs to a restaurateur friend in 
the neighborhood. Whenever she has time, 
she borrows Maya. 

Her apartment has such limited closet 
room that Cathleen has to park some of 
her wardrobe at her mother's larger apart- 
ment, some with near-by friends, and 
store some away, but there are always 
half a dozen cocktail and evening dresses 
hanging in her own small wardrobe space, 
because she is a popular girl who is asked 
out a lot. She likes straight-line, simple, 
I dark clothes, but looks devastating in full- 

skirted filmy frocks with tight bodices. 
Her favorite colors are gray, and blue and 
green to go with her eyes. She wears 
either a size 9 or 10. 

Englishmen appeal to Cathleen strongly, 
but she doesn't want to marry an actor, 
even an English one. She admires Irish- 

Irnen, too, thinks that Ed Slattery, the 
director of Second Husband, is "an utterly 
charming man and a wonderful director." 
She knew the late George Bernard Shaw 
and says she will never forget his special 
charm, the interesting face, the bright 
blue, piercing eyes. 




if Stunning attractive candid photos of all your favor- 
ites ! Suitable for framing in handsome 4x5 size, these 
superb pictures are quality printed on glossy stock. 
Look over the list. Keep up to date. Order novir for 
yourself and friends. 




CANDIDS 



1. Lana Turner 

2. Betty Grable 
3- Ava Gardner 

4. Clark Gable 

5. Alan Ladd 

6. Tyrone Power 

7. Gregory Peck 

8. Rita Hayworth 

9. Esther Williams 
11. Elizabeth Taylor 

14. Cornel Wilde 

15. Frank Sinatra 

18. Rory Calhoun 

19. Peter Lawford 

2 1 . Bob Mitchum 

22. Burt Lancaster 

23. Bing Crosby 
25. Dale Evans 
27. June AUyson 

30. Dana Andrews 

31. Glenn Ford 

33. Gene Autry 

34. Roy Rogers 

35. Sunset Carson 
46. Kathryn Grayson 

50. Diana Lynn 

5 1 . Doris Day 

52. Montgomery Clift 

53. Richard Widmark 

54. Mona Freeman 

56. Perry Como 

57. BillHolden 

65. Jane Powell 

66. Gordon MacRae 

67. Ann Blyth 

68. Jeanne Grain 

69. Jane Russell 

74. John Wayne 

75. Yvonne de Carlo 
78. Audie Murphy 



84. Janet Leigh 

86. Farley Granger 

88. Tony Martin 

91. John Derek 

92. Guy Madison 

93. Ricardo Montalban 

94. Mario Lanza 
97. Kirk Douglas 

103. Scott Brady 

105. Vic Damone 

106. Shelley Winters 

107. Richard Todd 

108. Vera-EUen 

109. Dean Martin 

110. Jerry Lewis 

111. Howard Keel 

112. Susan Hay ward 

113. Barbara Stanwyck 
117. Terry Moore 
121. Tony Curtis 

124. Gail Davis 

127. Piper Laurie 

128. Debbie Reynolds 

135. Jeflf Chandler 

136. Rock Hudson 

137. Stewart Granger 

139. Debra Paget 

140. Dale Robertson 

141. Marilyn Monroe 

142. Leslie Caron 

143. Pier Angeli 

144. Mitzi Gaynor 

145. Marlon Brando 

146. AldoRay 

147. Tab Hunter 

148. Robert Wagner 

149. RussTamblyn 

150. Jeff Hunter 
152. Marge and Gow- 

er Champion 



153. Fernando Lamas 

160. John Forsythe 

161. Lori Nelson 

162. Ursula Thiess 

163. Elaine Stewart 

174. Rita Gam 

175. Charlton Heston 

176. Steve Cochran 

177. Richard Burton 

179. Julius La Rosa 

180. Lucille Ball 

181. Eve Arden 

182. Jack Webb 
185. Richard Egan 

187. Jeff Richards 

188. Rosemary Clooney 

189. Guy Mitchell 

190. Pat Crowley 

191. Robert Taylor 

192. Jean Simmons 

193. Richard Anderson 

194. Audrey Hepburn 
196. Steve Forrest 



197. 
198. 
199. 
200. 
201. 
202. 
203. 
204. 
205. 
206. 
207. 
208. 
209. 
210. 
211. 
212. 
213. 
214. 
215. 
216. 
217. 
218. 



Joan Caulfield 
Gale Storm 
Dinah Shore 
Barry Nelson 
Ray Milland 
George Nader 
Reed Hadley 
Jo Stafford 
Ann Sothern 
David Brian 
Eddie Fisher 
Jane Froman 
Liberace 

Dorothy Dandridi 
Bob Francis 
Grace Kelly 
James Dean 
Sheree North 
Kim Novak 
Richard Davalos 
Julie Adams 
Eva Marie Saint 



FILL IN AND MAIL 
COUPON TODAY! 



I 
I 
I 
I 
■ 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



WORLD WIDE, DEPT. RM-7 

63 CENTRAL AVE.. OSSINING, N. Y. 

I enclose $ for candid 

pictures of my favorite stars and have circled 
the numbers of the ones you ore to send me 
by return mail. 

NAME 

STREET 

CITY 

ZONE STATE y 

g 
Fill out and mail coupon today. Send cash 
or money order. 12 pictures for $1 ; 6 for 50c. 



69 



T 
» 

70 




ARE YOU "ALL MOUTH" 
-AND NO EYES ? 

If you use lipstick, you need MAYBELLINE eye make-up to accent 
your eyes — for real beauty is balanced beauty. 

Your eyes are your most important feature! Don't leave them 
"washed-out looking" in contrast to a vividly made-up mouth. 

Make your eyes truly lovely today — quickly and easily — with 




PREFERRED BY S AA A R T 
WO/WEN THE WORLD OVER 



EYE SHADOW • EYEBROW 



OlSBI! 



• MASCARA 



MACNEflC 
POT HOLDERS 




Place these 
quilted 

magnetic pot 
holders flat 

against any metal surface 
(stove, refrigerator, metal 
cabinets, etc.). Presto! They 
"stay put"— ready and handy 
to use . . . flip them back 
against the metal-and they 
stay in place... as decorative 
as they are useful . . . tiny 
magnets are invisible and will 
last forever . . . washable and 
rust proof ... no modern 
kitchen should be without 
them... makes a stunning gift 
. . . Order yours NOW! We pay 
postage! Use coupon. 



"TWIN 
KITTENS" 



$ 



only 

25 

a pair 



1 



World Wide 

63 Central Ave., Ossining, N. Y. 

/ enclose $. . . .for. . ."Twin KHfens" 

Poi Holders. 



Name 

Streef 

City Zone. . . .State, 

Send cash or money order. 




your hair needs LOVALON 




For gayer, brighter, more colorful 
looking hair, be sure to use LOVALON 
after each shampoo. Lovalon removes 
dull film, blends in off color or gray- 
ing streaks and softens the appear- 
ance of dyed hair. Not a permanent 
dye, not a bleach — Lovalon is a rinse 
made in 12 hair i 
shades. Select 
the shade fori 
your coloring. 

10^ for 2 rinses 
250 for 6 rinses 




It was Shaw himself who was partially 
responsible for changing her name to Cor- 
dell from Kelly, when she was about six- 
teen and beginning her acting career in 
England. He, and a well-known producer. 

"I rebelled at first, and I didn't like the 
name Mr. Shaw suggested for me in a 
letter he wrote while I was doing his 
'Major Barbara' in England, for the films. 
His choice of name was Kitty Kordant. 
I thought it had a harsh sound. 

"At that time, I had lived abroad so 
long that I didn't know there was a won- 
derful and famous actress in America by 
the name of Katharine Cornell, so it was 
quite by accident that I chose a name so 
like hers. I should never have done it by 
design. It happened that Cordell Hull was 
much in the London headlines and I liked 
the name Cordell. I took it as my last 
name and replaced the K in Kathleen 
with a C. I am amused sometimes now 
when I ring people up and give my name, 
and get a reception out of all proportion 
to their interest in me, until they find 
out I am not Katharine Cornell!" 

Except for a brief visit back to her na- 
tive America when she was fifteen, Cath- 
leen was largely influenced by the British 
stage. She went to the Royal Academy of 
Dramatic Arts in London, and it was 
there that Shaw came to direct them, in a 
performance of "Heartbreak House." 

A long apprenticeship followed, in a 
repertory company in the north of Eng- 
land — very much like our summer stock, 
except that this was an all-year-round 
company: "It was cold and foggy and I 
was often miserable, but it was good 
theater and I was learning some of the 
things I very much needed to know about 
my craft." It led to the London stage, to 
good parts in fine plays. When World 
War II broke out, Cathleen was in "De- 
sign for Living," with Rex Harrison. 

These were times when everyone in 
England was called upon for special effort 
and, as a member of the BBC (British 
Broadcasting) repertory company, Cath- 
leen was asked to join a group that was 
being sent out of London to a secret des- 
tination in the heart of the country, there 
to broadcast to England and the Empire. 
They did everything from wartime docu- 
mentaries to gay nausicals to help keep up 
morale. They worked hard, lived simply, 
almost austerely at times. When they were 
shifted from country living to the city of 
Manchester, some of them were housed in 
a building which had been a shop, and 
Cathleen slept in a room which was for- 
merly a show window. She had only to 
pull the curtains apart to find herself prac- 
tically in the street. 

It was in England that Cathleen did a 
British version of "Gaslight," playing the 
role which Angela Lansbury did in Holly- 
wood. It was her first movie, and she 
thought it a terrific break because the 
film was to be shown in her native 
America. But it never got to this country 
until quite recently. She did "Major Bar- 
bara," the movie directed by Gabriel Pas- 
cal, but her part was cut down after film- 
ing was finished because the picture ran 
far too long. There had been one long 
speech of which she was very proud — and 
that was completely cut. The scene had 
been filmed near London Bridge, and when 
she did it, all the extras and the crowds 
that swarmed around the docks had burst 
into spontaneous applause as she finished 
her speech, and Mr. Pascal had told her 
she'd never get a greater compliment. 

Cathleen's film career was terribly dis- 
appointing, but there were many stage 
successes and she was doing marvelously 
well — when suddenly she decided to come 
back to this country. For one thing, her 
father's health was not good. (He died a 



little later. Her only brother, who was 
in the Air Force, had been killed during 
the war in the skies over England.) For 
another, this was her homeland. 

It was fine to be home. But, after a 
while, Cathleen began to realize that if 
she wanted to work — and she simply could 
not imagine a life without her work — she 
would have to get out and do something 
about it. Cathleen Cordell had been a 
rising young actress in England, but New 
York was not completely aware of her. 
Once started, she was in Broadway show 
after .show, but there were drawbacks to 
this: "They were all flops, even if ex- 
tremely distinguished flops. I had a good 
part in Terrence Rattigan's 'While the Sun 
Shines,' but the play had no run. I was 
in 'Sheppy,' with Edmund Gwenn ... in 
Guy Bolton's 'Golden Wings' . . . 'Yes- 
terday's Magic,' with Paul Miuii, which 
was written by Ejnlyn Williams and ran 
six weeks — a record run for me on Broad- 
way . . . and my last one, Priestly's 'Linden 
Tree,' produced by Maurice Evans." 

Radio was rather like a breeze, a sweet 
and lovely breeze that never stopped 
blowing. "I have never had what you 
would call a 'slump' in radio. Not from 
the day I started. A rvmning part in The 
Romance Of Helen Trent had to be given 
up only because the time conflicted with 
my work in Second Husband. For almost 
two years, I have been MiUicent Loring 
on Young Widder Brown. Even on tele- 
vision I have done many of the dramatic 
shows, such as Studio One, Kraft and 
Philco. I played a running part on Search 
For Tomorrow during its first months on 
the air. And I have done parts on many 
of radio's big dramatic programs. 

"I used to do many German parts, 
countesses and the like. And French girls. 
And, of course, British. But, oddly enough, 
I am not particularly good in Irish roles, 
in spite of the fact that I am the daughter 
of a Patrick Kelly!" 

Cathleen thinks she is very lucky to 
have worked with many different direc- 
tors, each of whom "saw" her in a different 
sort of part. A few still think of her only 
as an "English actress." Actually, she can 
talk as American as anyone when she 
tries, forgetting the years she spent in 
England. "After all, I was born in Brook- 
lyn, and I am an American." 

Cathleen sometimes thinks she might 
have gone further in the theater if she 
had not fitted into radio with such ease. 
And, considering her English successes, 
she probably would have. But now she 
loves her life in radio, the regularity of 
her day's schedule, the time it gives her 
for a full and satisfying social life, and 
the way she can arrange her time for all 
the things she wants to do. ITiere was a 
period, however, when she grew^ very 
tired of being cast always as the "other 
woman," and it has been a real joy to find 
a sympathetic role in Second HtLshand. 

"In England my parts were usually 
sympathetic, but here I have been rather 
dreadful," she says. "Now, at last, I am a 
loving wife and a mother who is trying 
very hard to do her very best for her 
children. It's fxm to be with the children 
who play my two yoiingsters, and a privi- 
lege to play opposite an actor of the 
statirre of Richard Waring, who has the 
role of my husband, Wajme Lockwood. 
We have a fine cast, and everyone con- 
nected with the show is wonderful." 

For a bachelor glamour girl, this is a 
challenging role, and Cathleen CordeU 
pours into it all the vividness of her own 
personality and her fine theatrical back- 
ground . . . the vividness that makes 
Diane Lockwood an exciting woman as 
she daily struggles with the problems of 
being a good mother and a good wife to 
a Second H-'ifi^and. 



^i■.v-s■u1.n.w^VAv.%sv.■-s%•■v■■.v-■-■-■uv.■■s■.■-v■■-■.■■"J".■.■-"■WA■--.■ 

I HERE'S YOUR 
COOK BOOK 



■i 



!>.%■ 



The Most Unusual 
Cook Book 
Published! 



Here — at last — is your dream cook book 
. . . the cook book that has everything 
. . . the cook book that tops them all! 

Exciting Recipes From 
Revolutionary Days to Today 

There's a story behind this cook book 
— and a fascinating story it is, too. The 
recipes in this cook book are all proven 
recipes. So, what is so unusual about that 
you ask? Well, most cook book recipes 
are tested by college-trained dietitians in 
scientific kitchens. These recipes were, 
too, but they first were tested in the din- 
ing rooms of actual homes throughout 
the country. These recipes are the time- 
tested favorites of True Siory readers 
from coast to coast. These are their fa- 
vorite recipes — the recipes handed down 
from mother to daughter — from revolu- 
tionary days right up to the present day. 

The Magic Cook Book is your cook 
book. It contains the very best — the most 
unusual — and the most highly prized 
recipes ever put into book form. 

Here you'll discover Mrs. Bailey's Soda 
Biscuits that are the fluffiest and flakiest 
biscuits you ever tasted and they just 
melt in your mouth. And for the dreami- 
est main dish, you have just got to try 
Mrs. Lazaroff's Veal Parmigiana — your 
men folk will just rave over it. Then, 
there is Mrs. Hooker's Macaroni Loaf 
with Cheese Sauce — this succulent dish 
just oozes with zest — the only trouble 
with it is that you wiU never make 
enough to satisfy your family or your 
guests!! For a dessert that will make 
them stand up and cheer — try Mrs. Lock- 
hart's special recipe for Pecan Pie. It's 
the most heavenly dish to top off a meal 
— and you will be rated the Queen of 
Hearts for serving it — time after time 
after time. 

Your Cooking Will Be 
The Talk of the Town 

Space here is too limited to tell you of the 
hundreds of special prize recipes this un- 
usual cook book contains. Each dish seems 
more exciting than the next. With this book 
at hand meal planning is an exciting ad- 
venture — not a chore. Your neighbors and 
friends will want copies of all the yummy 
dishes you serve. Your cooking will be the 
talk of the town! 

Here is where your cook book will pay for 
itself over, and over again. You may be 
overpaying for your meat and not know it. 
For certain dishes you get better tenderness 
and more flavor by purchasing the lower 
grade of meat — and you save money be- 







sides! Few people know this and, of course, 
your butcher won't tell!! 

It's Complete 

The Magic Cook Book is more than a col- 
lection of exciting recipes. It is a complete 
storehouse of cooking information. Here 
you will find in simple, easy-to-understand 
language, important facts on nutrition . . . 
special sickroom diets . . . everyday menus, 
as well as menus for holidays and important 
occasions . . . suggestions on cooking for 
two . . . lunch-box hints for children and 
workers . . . new ways to use package mixes 
. . . canning and preserving instructions 
. . . rules for table setting and service. Also 
many useful charts and tables that you will 
find of tremendous value. 

Use It at Our Risk 

The price of this giant book, 
which is beautifully bound 
iri washable fabrikoid, is only 
$1.98 — and we pay the post- 
age. Order your copy of this 
unusual cook book on oiu- 
money - back - if -not - satisfied 
plan. You cannot lose — order 
copies of this wonderful book 
for yourself — and as gifts for 
your friends — Today. Our 
supply is limited. 

■■■ — MAIL THIS COUPON TODAV-I 

Readers' Service Bureau ! 

TRUE STORY. Dept. RM-755 ! 

205 E. 42nd St.. New York 17, N. Y. J 

Send me postpaid, a copy of the MAGIC ! 
COOK BOOK. I enclose $1.98. \ 

I 
Name I 

Please Print ■ T 

! V 

I R 




Address. 



City State. 



71 



I 



nside Radio 

All Times Listed Are Eastern Daylight Time. 



Monday through Friday 



NBC 



MBS 



ABC 



CBS 



Mor 

8:30 
8:45 


ning Pro^rai 


MS 

Local Program 

8:55 It Happens 
Every Dayf 


John MacVane 
8:55 Betty Crockert 




9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 




Robert Hurleigh 
Easy Does It 
News, Cecil Brown 


Breakfast Club 




10:00 

10:15 
10:30 

10:4!= 


Mary Margaret 

McBride 
10:05 Norman 

Vincent Peale 
Joyce Jordan, M.D. 
Doctor's Wife 

Breali Tlie Bank 


Cecil Brown 

Guest Time 
News 

10:35 Johnny 
Olsen Show 


My True Story 

10:25 Whispering 
Streets 


Arthur Godfrey Time 


11:00 

11:15 

11:30 
11:45 


Strike It Rich 

Phrase That Pays 
Second Chance 


Florida Calling With 
Tom Moore 

11:25 Holland Engle 
Queen For A Day 

tM-W-F 


Companion— 
Dr. Mace 
Paging The New 

Albert Warner, News 
Your Neighbor's 
Voice 


Arthur Godfrey 
(con.) 

Make Up Your Mind 
Second Husband 



Afternoon Programs 



12:00 


Pauline Frederick 


Noon News 


Valentino 


Wendy Warren & 




Reporting 


12:05 Down At 




The News 


12:15 




Holmesy's 


Frank Farrell 


Rosemary 


12:30 








Helen Trent 


12:45 








Our Gal Sunday 


1:00 




News, Cedric Foster 


Paul Harvey, News 


Road Of Life 


1:15 




Luncheon At Sardi's 


Ted Malone 


Ma Perkins 


1:30 




Ted Steele Show 




Young Dr. Malone 


1:45 








The Guiding Light 


2:00 




Luncheon With 




Second Mrs. Burton 


2:15 




Lopez 
2:25 News, Sam 

Hayes 
Wonderful City 




Perry Mason 


2:30 




Betty Crockert 


This Is Nora Drake 


2:45 






2:35 Martin Block 


The Brighter Day 


3:00 


News 


Ruby Mercer Show 


Martin Block (con.) 


Hilltop House 


3:15 


3:05 Woman In Love 






Art Linkletter's 


3:30 


Pepper Young 






House Party 


3:45 


Right To Happiness 








4:00 


Backstage Wife 


Bruce & Dan 


Latin Quarter 




4:15 


Stella Dallas 




Matinee 
4:25 Betty Crockert 




4:30 


Young Widder Brown 


Tex Fletcher's 


Treasury Bandstand 


Treasury Bandstand 


4:45 


Woman In My House 


Wagon Show 




4:55 News 


5:00 


Just Plain Bill 


Bobby Benson- 
(Sgt. Preston)' 


Musical Express 


News 

5:05 John Faulk 


5:15 


Lorenzo Jones 


Bobby Benson 


Bobby Hammack 




5:30 


Hots! For Pets 




Gloria Parker 




5:45 


It Pays To Be 
Married 


America's Business 
5:50 Wismer, Sports 
5:55 Cecil Brown 
'T-Th m-f 
W-Adventures Of 
Long John Silver 


Vincent Lopez 
tM-W-F 


5:55 This 1 Believe 



6:00 
6:15 

6:30 
6:45 

7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 



8:00 

8:15 
8:30 
8:45 



9:00 



9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



Monday 



Sports Daily with 
Mel Allen, Russ 
Hodges 

Three Star Extra 



Evening Programs 



Alex Dreier, Man 

On The Go 
News Of The World 
One Man's Family 



Henry J. Taylor 
Best Of All 



Telephone Hour 



Band Of America 



Fibber McGee fc 

Molly 
Great Gildersleeve 
Wings For Tomorrow 



Local Program 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 
Gabriel Heatter 
In The Mood 



Top Secret Files 
Broadway Cop 



News, Lyie Van 
9:05 Footnotes to 

History 
Spotlight Story 
Reporters' Roundup 



Maxie Whitney Orch. 



Distinguished Artists 



ABC Reporter 



Bill Stern, Sports 
George Hicks, News 



Vandercook, News 
Quincy Howe 
The Lone Ranger 
7:55 Les Griffith, 
News 



Jack Gregson Show 

American Music Hall 
Voice Of Firestone 



Music Tent 



9:25 News 
Disaster— Red 
Cross Show 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
How To Fix It 
Martha Lou Harp 



Jackson & The News 
East Of Athens 



Lowell Thomas 



Joe Foss, Sports 
7:05 Tennessee 

Ernie 
Edward R. Murrow 



Mr. Keen, Tracer 
Of Lost Persons 
8:25 Doug Edwards 
Arthur Godfrey's 
Talent Scouts 



Bing Crosby 

Amos 'n' Andy Music 

Hail 
9:55 News 



Music Room 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



Tuesday 



NBC 

Sports Dally 
Three Star Extra 



7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 



8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 



9:00 



9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 

6:45 



Alex Dreier, 

Man On The Go 
News Of The World 
One Man's Family 



People Are Funny 
Dragnet 



Biographies in 
Sound 



Fibber McGee & 

Molly 
Great Gildersleeve 
Listen To 

Washington 



Evening 

MBS 
Local Program 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 
Gabriel Heatter 
Eddie Fisher 



Treasury Agent 



News, LyIe Van 
9:05 Footnotes to 

History 
Spotlight Story 
Army Hour 



Musical Almanac 



Dance Music 



Programs 

ABC 
ABC Reporter 

Bill Stern, Sports 
George Hicks, News 



Vandercook, News 
Quincy Howe 

7:55 Les Griffith 



Joe Foss, Sports 
7:05 Tennessee 

Ernie 
Edward R. Murrow 



Jack Gregson Show 
8:25 News 

3:55 News 



Sammy Kaye 
9:25 E. D. Canham, 
News 

Platterbrains 
9:55 News 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
How To Fix It 
Take Thirty 



CBS 
Jackson fc The News 

Lowell Thomas 



Suspense 

8:25 Doug Edwards 
Disk Derby, 
Fred Robbins 



Rosemary Clooney 
Bing Crosby 



Amos 'n' Andy Music 
Hall 



Joe Foss, Sports 
10:05 Dance 
Orchestra 



Wednesday 



Evening Programs 



7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 



8:00 
8:15 



8:30 
8:45 



9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



Sports Daily 
Three Star Extra 



Alex Dreier, 

Man On The Go 
News Of The World 
One Man's Family 



Dinah Shore 
Frank Sinatra 

News 

8:35 College Quiz 
Bowl 



You Bet Your Life 

News 

9:35 Truth Or 
Consequences 



Fibber McGee & 

Molly 
Great Gildersleeve 
Keys To The Capital 



Thursday 



Local Program 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 
Gabriel Heatter 
Les Paul, Mary Ford 



True Detective 
Sentenced 



News, LyIe Van 
Spotlight Story 
CBC Symphony 



CBC Symphony (con.) 



Sounding Board 



ABC Reporter 

Bill Stern, Sports 
George Hicks, News 



Vandercook, News 
Quincy Howe 
Lone Ranger 
7:55 Les Griffith 



Jack Gregson Show 
8:25 News 



8:55 News 



Sammv Kaye 
9:25 News 
President's News 
Conference 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
How To Fix It 



Jackson & The News 



Lowell Thomas 



Joe Foss, Sports 
7:05 Tennessee 

Ernie 
Edward R. Murrow 



FBI In Peace And 

War 
8:25 Doug Edwards 
Disk Derby, 

Fred Robbins 



Evening Programs 



6:001 

6:15 Sports Daily 

6:30 

6:45 Three Star Extra 



7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 



8:00 
8:15 
8:30 



9:00 



9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



Alex Dreier, 

Man On The Go 
News Of The World 
One Man's Family 



Roy Rogers 
Dr. Six Gun 



News 

9:05 Barrie Craig 



Penitentiary 



Fibber McGee & 

Molly 
Great Gildersleeve 
Jane Pickens Show 



Friday 



Sports Daily 
Three Star Extra 



Local Program 



Fulton Lewis, 
Dinner Date 
Gabriel Heatter 
Eddie Fisher 



Jr. 



Official Detective 



News, LyIe Van 
9:05 Footnotes to 

History 
Spotlight Story 
State Or The Nation 



Musical Caravan 



Henry Jerome Orch. 



ABC Reporter 

Bill Stern, Sports 
George Hicks, News 



Vandercook, News 

Quincy Howe 

Saga 

7:55 Les Griffith 



Jack Gregson Show 



8:55 News 



Sammy Kaye 



9:25 News 
Rhythm & Blues 
On Parade 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
How To Fix It 
Front & Center 



Joe Foss, Sports 
7:05 Tennessee 

Ernie 
Edward R. Murrow 



The Whistler 
8:25 Doug Edwards 
Disk Derby, 
Fred Robbins 



Evening Programs 



7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 



8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 



9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



Alex Dreier, 

Man On The Go 
News Of The World 
One Man's Family 



Dinah Shore 
Frank Sinatra 
National Radio 
Fan Club 



Radio Fan Club 
(con.) 



Boxing— Cavalcade 
Of Sports 

Sports Highlights 



Local Program 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Men's Corner 
Gabriel Heatter 
Les Paul, Mary Ford 



Counter-Spy 
Take A Number 



News, LyIe Van 
9:05 Footnotes to 

History 
Heartbeat Of 

Industry 



Family Theater 



London Studios 
Melodies 



ABC Reporter 

Bill Stern, Sports 
George Hicks, News 



Vandercook, News 
Quincy Howe 
Lone Ranger 
7:55 Les Griffith 



Jack Gregson Show 
8:25 News 

8:55 News 



Sammy Kaye 
Notes & Notations 
9:55 News 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
How To Fix It 
Indoors Unlimited 



Joe Foss, Sports 
7:05 Tennessee 

Ernie 
Edward R. Murrow 



Godfrey Digest 
8:25 Doug Edwards 
Disk Derby, 
Fred Robbins 



Joe Foss, Sports 
10:05 Dance 
Orchestra 



Bing Crosby 

Amos 'n' Andy Music 

Hall 
9:55 News 



Joe Foss, Sports 
10:05 White House 
Report 



Jackson & The News 



Lowell Thomas 



Rosemary Clooney 
Bing Crosby 



Amos 'n' Andy Music 
Hall 



Joe Foss, Sports 
10:05 Dance 
Orchestra 



Jackson & The News 



Lowell Thomas 



Bing Crosby 

Afflos 'n' Andy Music 

Hall 
9:55 News 



I 



nside Radio 



Saturday 



NBC 



MBS 



ABC 



CBS 



Morning Progra 

8:30 Monitor 
S:45 


Local Program 


Doug Browning 
Show 


News 


9:00 News 

9:15 9:05 Monitor 

9:30 
9:45 


News 


No School 
Today 


News Of America 
Farm News 

Garden Gate 


10:00 News 

10:05 Monitor 
10:15; 
10:30 
10:45 


American Travel 
Guide 


No School 
Today (con.) 

Breakfast Club 
Review 


News 

10:05 Galen Drake 
Show 

10:55 News 


11.00 News 

11:05 Monitor 
11:15 
11:30 ; 
11:45 1 


Lucky Pierre 

Johnny Desmond 

Show 
11:55 Young Living 


11:05 Half-Pint 
Panel 

All League Club- 
house 


Robert 0. Lewis 
Show 



Afternoon Programjs 



12:00 
12:15 

12:30 
12:45 


News 

12:05 Monitor 


1 Asked You 

Tex Fletcher 
Wagon Show 


News 

12:05 101 Ranch 

Boys 
American Farmer 


Noon News 
12:05 Romance 

Gunsmoke 


1:00 
1:15 
1:30 

1:45 


News Fifth Army Band 
1:05 Monitor 

Ruby Mercer 


News 

1:05 Navy Hour 

Vincent Lopez 

1 :55 News 


City Hospital 
1:25 News, Jackson 
Stan Daugherty 
Presents 


2:00 
2:15 
2:30 
2:45 


News Ruby Mercer (con.) 
2:05 Monitor 2:25 News 

Sports Parade 


News 

2:05 Festival, with 
Milton Cross 


Dance Orchestra 
Teddy Wilson Orch. 


3:00 
3:15 
3:30 
3:45 


News 

3:05 Monitor 


Country Jamboree 


News 

3:05 Festival (con.) 


String Serenade 
Skinnay Ennis Orch. 


4:00 

4:15 
4:30 


News 

4:05 Monitor 


Bandstand, U.S.A. 


News 

4:05 Pop Concert 
Horse Racing 
Band Concert 
Promenade 


Dance Orchestra 


5:00 

5:15 
5:30 

5:45 


News 

5:05 Monitor 


Teenagers Unlimited 
5:55 News 


News 

5:05 Dinner At The 
Green Room 


Adventures In 

Science 
Richard Hayes 
News, Jackson 
5:35 Saturday At 

The Chase 



Evening Programs 



6:00 


News 

6:05 Monitor 


John T. Flynn 


News 

6:05 Pan-American 
Union 


News 


6:15 




World Traveler 


Sports, Bob Finnegan 


Sports Review 


6:30 




Report From 
Washington 


Bob Edge, Sports 
Afield 


Capitol Cloakroom 


6:45 




Basil Heatter 




6:55 Joe Foss, 
Sports 


7:00 


News 


Pop The Question 


News 


News, Jackson 




7:05 Monitor 




7:05 At Ease 


7:05 Make Way For 


7:15 








Youth 


7:30 




Have A Heart 


Labor-Manage- 


Gangbusters 


7:45 






ment Series 




8:00 


News 


True Or False 


News 


Gunsmoke 


8:15 


8:05 Monitor 




8:05 Dance Party 




8:30 




Quaker City Capers 




Disk Derby, 


8:45 








Fred Robbins 


9:00 


News 


Hawaii Calls 


News 


Two For The Money 


9:15 


9:05 Monitor 




9:05 Dance Party 




9:30 




Lombardo Land 


(con.) 


Country Style 


9:45 








9:55 News, Jackson 


10:00 


News 


Chicago Theater Of 


News 


Country Style (con.) 




10:05 Monitor 


The Air 


10:05 Ozark 




10:15 






Jubilee 




10:30 






Ambassador Hotel 


Dance Orchestra 



Sunday 



NBC 



MBS 



Morning Programs 

8:30 Monitor 
8:45 



9:00 
9:15 



9:30 
9:45 



10:00 
10:15 



10:30 
10:45 



11:00 
11:15 
11:30 
11:45 



News 

9:05 Monitor 



News 

10:05 Monitor 



News 

11:05 Monitor 



Wings Of Healing 
Back To God 



News 

9:05 Milton Cross 

Album 
Voice Of Prophecy 



Radio Bible Class 
Voice Of Prophecy 



Frank And Ernest 

Christian Science 

Monitor 
Northwestern 

Reviewing Stand 



ABC 



Light And Life Hour 



CBS 



Renfro Valley 
8:55 Galen Drake 



World News Roundup 
Sidney Walton Show 

Organ Music, 

E. Power Biggs 
9:55 News, Trout 



News 

10:05 Message Of 

Israel 
News 
10:35 College Choir 



Sunday Melodies 
11:05 Marines On 
Review 

News 

11:35 Christian In 
Action 



Church Of The Air 



Church Of The Air 
(con.) 



Salt Lake Tabernacle 
Choir 



Invitation To 
Learning 



Afternoon Programs 



12:00 

12:15 
12:30 

12:45 


News 

12:05 Monitor 


Marine Band 

News, Bill Cunning- 
ham 
Merry Mailman 


The World Tomorrow 


News, LeSueur 
12:05 The Leading 
Question 


1:00 
1:15 
1:30 

1:45 


News 

1:05 Monitor 


Global Frontiers 
Christian Science 
Lutheran Hour 


Herald Of Truth 

News 

1:35 Pilgrimage 


Wooiworth Hour- 
Percy Faith, 
Macdonald Carey 


2:00 
2:15 
2:30 
2:45 


News 

2:05 Monitor 


Music From Britain 


Dr. Oral Roberts 
Wings Of Healing 


Symphonette 

World Music 
Festival 


3:00 

3:15 
3:30 
3:45 


News 

3:05 Monitor 


Music From Britain 

(con.) 
Bandstand, U.S.A 

Basil Heatter 


News 

3:05 Air Force Show 

Hour Of Decision 


World Music 
Festival (con.) 


4:00 
4:15 
4:30 
4:45 


News 

4:05 Monitor 


Salute To The Nation 

Nick Carter 

4:55 Lome Greene 


Old-Fashioned 
Revival Hour 


News, Trout 
4:05 On A Sunday 
Afternoon 


5:00 
5:15 
5:30 
5:45 


News 

5:05 Monitor 


Adventures Of Rin 

Tin Tin 
The Masqueraders 
5:55 Cecil Brown 


News 


News, Trout 
5:05 On A Sunday 
Afternoon (con.) 
5:55 News, Trout 



Eve 

6:00 

6.15 
8:30 
6:45 


ning Prograi 

News 

6:05 Monitor 


US 

Public Prosecutor- 
Jay Jostyn 

On The Line, Bob 
Considine 

All Star Sport Time 


Monday Morning 

Headlines 
Paul Harvey. News 
Evening Comes 


Gene Autry 
Sunday Playhouse 


7:00 

7:15 
7:30 
7:45 


News 

7:05 Monitor 


Richard Hayes Show 
Studio Concert 


News 

7:05 Showtime 

Revue 
George Sokolsky 
Valentino 
Travel Talk 


Juke Box Jury 


8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 


News 

8:05 Monitor 


West Point Band 
Enchanted Hour 


American Town 
Meeting 


Gary Crosby 

My Little Margie 


9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 


News 

9:05 Monitor 


Fulton Lewis, Jr 
Success Story 
Manion Forum 
Keep Healthy 


Walter Winchell 
News, Quincy Howe 
Sammy Kaye 

9:55 News 


Rudy Vailee Show 


10:00 

10:15 
10:30 


News 

10:05 Monitor 


Billy Graham 
Little Symphonies 


Paul Harvey, News 

Elmer Davis 
Revival Time 


News, Schorr 
10:05 Face The Na- 
tion 
John Derr, Sports 



See Next Page- 



T 
V 
R 

73 



TV program highlights 



NEW YORK CITY AND SUBURBS AND NEW HAVEN, CHANNEL 8, JUNE 8— JULY 7 



Baseball on TV 



T 
V 
R 

74 



DATE 


TIME 


CH. 


JUNE 






8, 'W'. 


1:30 


11 




8:00 


9 


9, Th. 


1:30 


9 




1:30 


11 


10, F. 


8:00 


9 




8:00 


11 


11, Sat. 


1:55 


2 




2:00 


9& 




2:00 


11 


12, Sun. 


2:00 


9& 




2:00 


11 


14, Tu. 


8:15 


11 




9:00 


9 


15, W. 


2:00 


11 




9:00 


9 


16, Th. 


2:00 


11 




9:00 


9 


17, F. 


8:15 


11 


18, Sat. 


1:55 


2 




2:00 


11 & 




9:00 


9 


19, Sun. 


2:00 


11 & 


21, Tu. 


2:30 


9 




8:15 


11 



-R 



GAME 

Mil. VS. Giants 
Cine. vs. Dodgers 
Cine. vs. Dodgers 
Mil. vs. Giants 
Chi. vs. Dodgers 
St. L. vs. Giants 
Yanks vs. Cleve.- 
Chi. vs. Dodgers 
St. L. vs. Giants 
Chi. vs. Dodgers — D 
St. L. vs. Giants 
Det. vs. Yanks 
Dodgers vs. Cine. — R 
Det. vs. Yanks 
Dodgers vs. Cine. — R 
Det. vs. Yanks 
Det. vs. Cine. — R 
Chi. vs. Yanks 
Cleve. vs. Boston 
Chi. vs. Yanks 
Dodgers vs. St. L. — R 
Chi. vs. Yanks — D 
Dodgers vs. Chi. — R 
Kan. C. vs. Yanks 



D — Doubleheader 



TIME CH. 



22, W. 


2:00 


11 


23, Th. 


2:00 


11 


24, F. 


8:15 


11 


25, Sat. 


1:55 


2 




2:00 


11 & 


26, Sun. 


2:00 


11 & 


28, Tu. 


2:00 


11 




8:00 


9 


29, W. 


2:00 


11 




8:00 


9 


30, Th. 


1:30 


9 


JULY 






1,F. 


2:00 


11 




8:00 


9 


2, Sat. 


1:55 


2 




2:00 


9& 




8:15 


11 


3, Sun. 


2:00 


9 




2:00 


11 & 


4,M. 


1:30 


11 


5,Tu. 


8:00 


9 


6,W. 


8:00 


11 


7,Th. 


1:30 


11 


8,F. 


8:00 


11 



R — Road same 



Kan. C. vs. Yanks 
Kan. C. vs. Yanks 
Cleve. vs. Yanks 
Chi. vs. Boston 
Cleve. vs. Yanks 
Cleve. vs. Yanks — D 
Bait. vs. Yanks 
Giants vs. Dodgers 
Bait. vs. Yanks 
Giants vs. Dodgers 
Giants vs. Dodgers 



Wash. vs. Yanks 
Pgh. vs. Dodgers 
Giants vs. Phila. — R 
Pgh. vs. Dodgers 
Wash. vs. Yanks 
Pgh. vs. Dodgers — D 
Wash. vs. Yanks 
Bos. vs. Yanks — D 
Dodgers vs. Phila. — R 
Phila. vs. Giants 
Phila. vs. Giants 
Dodgers vs. Giants 



Monday through Friday 



7:00 Morning Show— Jack's up to Poor 

O & [s] Today— Getaway with Garroway 

9:00 George Skinner— AM Variety 

10:00 Garry Moore Show— Garry's great! 

O & [s] Ding Dong School- TV nursery 

10:30 Arthur Godfrey Time— He talks good 

O & [s] Way Of The World-Drama 
11:00 O Home — Arlene Francis, homemaker 

Q Romper Room— Keeps the kids quiet 
11:30 &\s] Strike It Rich-Warren Hull 
© Wendy Barrie— She'll delight you 
12:00 Valiant Lady— Day drama 

O & d] Tennessee Ernie— Music & fun 
12:15 & [s] Love Of Life-Story of a widow 
12:30 &[1] Search For Tomorrow— Serial 
O Feather Your Nest— Bud Collyer 
Entertainment— Midday open house 
12:45 (& at 2:30)-The Guiding Light 
1:00 Inner Flame— Portia faces life 

O Norman Brokenshire Show— Fun! 
© Claire Mann— For beauty & health 
1:15 Road Of Life-Serial 
1:30 &[§] Welcome Travelers— Fr^.i Chi. 
O Here's Looking At You— Beauty tips 
2:00 & m Robert Q. Lewis— Lives it up 
2:30 Linkletter's House Party— Tres gai! 
3:00 & [s] The Big Payoff- h4ice prizes 
O Ted Mack's Matinee— Homey 
O Ted Steele— Music and relaxed talk 
3:30 Bob Crosby Show— Joint's jumpin' 

O & [i] Greatest Gift— Fern medic 
3:45 Q &{&] Concerning Miss Marlowe 
4:00 Brighter Day— Daytime drama 

O & [ll Hawkins Falls-Serial 
4:15 & [s] Secret Storm— Serial 

O First Love— Story of newly-weds 
4:30 & d] On Your Account— $$$ quiz 

O Mr. Sweeney— Ruggles with chuckles 
EARLY EVENING 
7:00 O Kukia, Fran & OIlie— Whimsey 
7:30 News— The day reviewed 

O Songs— Tony Martin, Mon.; Dinah 
Shore, Tues., Thurs.; Eddie Fisher, Wed., Fri. 
O Million Dollar Movies— June 7-13, 
"So Young, So Bad"; June 14-20, "One Big 
Affair"; June 21-27, "Syncopation"; June 
28-July 4, "Happiest Days of Your Life"; 
July 5-11, "Lucky Nick Cain." 
7:45 Songs— Como, Stafford, Froman: Be- 



ginning June 27, Julius LaRosa every night 
LATE NIGHT 

10:00 O Million Dollar Movies— Same sched- 
ule as shown at 7:30 P.M. 

11:00 (D Liberace— Concerts by candlelight 

11:15 O Tonight— Steve Allen 

12:00 O Moonlight Movie— Rain or shine 



Monday P.M. 



7:30 © Life With Elizabeth— Betty White 

Name's The Same— Bob & Ray 
8:00 Burns & Allen— Gracie grills George 

O & S Caesar's Hour— Sid stars 
8:30 Talent Scouts- Godfrey's showcase 

Voice Of Firestone— Long-hair recital 
9:00 & {¥{ I Love Lucy— An absolute Ball 

O & [i] The Medic- Documentaries 
9:30 & Ul Ethel & Albert— Comedy begins 
June 20. 

O Robert Montgomery Presents 
10:00 & [T| Studio One— Full-hour dramas 

Eddie Cantor— Filmed variety show 
10:30 O Big Town— Mark Stevens as Steve 



Tuesday 



7:00 O Science Fiction Theater— Weird 
8:00 Life With Father— Leon Ames stars 
8:30 Halls Of Ivy— The Ronald Colmans 

Who Said That?— John Daly, emcee 
9:00 & [U Meet Millie— Sassy, saucy Elena 
O Fireside Theater— Telefilms 
Make Room For Daddy— Comedy 
9:30 & [s] Red Skelton Show— Laughs 

O Circle Theater— Drama, live & lively 
10:00 $64,000 Question— $$$$$ quiz 

© & [s] Truth Or Consequences 
10:30 See it Now— Ed Murrow's video mag 
It's A Great Life— Eddie Dunn 
Stop The Music— Bert Porks with $$ 



Wednesday 



7:30 Disneyland— Fascinating fun 

8:00 & [s] Godfrey & Friends— Variety 
© What's The Story— News panel-quiz 
O Request Performance— Dramas 

8:30 O (& [Kl ot 9:30) My Little Margie 
O Mr. Citizen— Stories of heroism 

9:00 & d] The Millionaire— $tories 



O Kraft Theater— Full-hour teleplays 
© Impact— Hour-long tales of tension 
Masquerade Party— Costume quiz 
9:30 I've Got A Secret— Moore fun 

O Penny To A Million— $10,000 quiz 

10:00 O This is Your Life— Exciting bios 
Blue Ribbon Boxing 

10:30 O Doug Fairbanks Presents— Stories 



Thursday 



7:00 O Guy Lombardo— Heavenly music 

7:30 Lone Ranger— Bang, bong 

8:00 Meet Mr. McNulty-Merry Milland 

G * S You Bet Your Life-Groucho 
8:30 Climax!— Hard-hitting drama 

O Justice— Gary Merrill stars 
9:00 O & (H Dragnet— Webb at work 

Star Tonight— Original teleplays 
9:30 Four Star Playhouse— Telefilms 

O & [l] Ford Theater— Good viewing 

Pond's Theater— Live plays 
10:00 Public Defender— Reed Hodley night 

O & [U Lux Video Theater-Full hour 
10:30 Willy— Comedy Havoc with June 

Racket Squad— Reed Hadley's encore 



Friday 



7:30 © Life With Elizabeth— A cute beaut 

8:00 &[|] Mama— Ingratiating 

© Secret Files, U.S.A.— Adventures 
O Ozzie & Harriet— Zestful 

8:30 Topper— Hocus-pocus comedy 

O & [1 Life Of Riley-Beguiling Bill 
O Ray Bolger Show— A happy show 

9:00 Playhouse Of Stars— Filmed dramas 
O & @ Big Story— Real reporters 
© Mr. & Mrs. North-Whodunits 

9:30 Our Miss Brooks— Eve Arden stars 
O & [T] Dear Phoebe— Peter Lawford 
The Vise— High-tension English films 
10:00 The Line-Up— City detectives detect 

© Chance Of A Lifetime— Variety 
10:30 Person To Person— Murrow's visits 
© Down You Go— First-rate panel quiz 
Mr. District Attorney— David Brian 



Saturday 



7:30 Beat The Clock— Stunts for prizes 

© Show Wagon— Heidt's talent salute 
8:00 Jackie Gleason— Gleeful comedy 

O & m Mickey Rooney— Comedy series 
8:30 Dotty Mack Show— Musicmimics 
9:00 Two For The Money— Quiz, $hrlner 

Q & ![|] imogene Coca— Impish 
9:30 My Favorite Husband— Very merry 

Ozark Jubilee— Red Foley's variety 
10:00 O & m George Gobel— Clown Prince 
10:30 Damon Runyon Theater— Stories 

O & [H Your Hit Parade— Hit skits 



Sunday 



6:00 I Love Lucy— Repeat of 1951 shows 
6:30 My Hero— Bob Cummings in comedy 
7:00 O & m People Are Funny— Linkletter 
You Asked For It— Art Baker, emcee 
8:00 & [U Toast Of The Town— Variety 

O Colgate's New Variety— Full hour 
9:00 G-E Theater— Ronald Reagan, host 
O & [T] TV Playhouse- Fine teleplays 
9:30 Stage 7— Hollywood stars in drama 
© Life Begins At Eighty— Panel panic 
10:00 Appointment With Adventure 

O & H Loretta Young Show— Stories 
O Break The Bank— Bert Parks, quiz 
(D Florian ZaBach— Fiddle-faddle 
10:30 &JT] What's My Line?— Job game 
O Bob Cummings Show— Farce 
O Paris Precinct- Cherchez le crime 



The Name's The Same 

(Continued from page 39) 
with the proper vitamins for animals, 
which just dropped to the ground when 
shot.) All of 1000 listeners, however, 
wrote in requesting the "Handy Home- 
Wrecking Kit." 

Bob Elliott and Ray Goulding, who used 
to feature such give-aways on their net- 
work TV show, were invariably disap- 
pointed at the mail — not that it was so 
small, but that anyone wrote in at all. They 
have no objections to people being Uterate, 
of course, but when they're so literal that 
they actually want the kits as advertised 
. . . wow! As for the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion — that foiindation for the increase and 
diffusion of knowledge — it sent a dignified 
letter to Bob and Ray demanding that, 
henceforth, they stop giving the national 
museum as an address for premiums. 

The boys stopped, but orders continued 
pouring in at a new address — this time 
for bargains "at laughably low prices" 
from Bob and Ray's "over-stocked surplus 
warehouse." The hottest item turned out 
to be the sweaters with "O" on them. "If 
your name doesn't begin with 'O,' " the 
sales-pitch ran, "we can have it legally 
changed for you. Sweaters come in two 
styles — turtle-neck or V-neck. State what 
kind of neck you have." 

The point, of course, was not what kind 
of neck you have — but what kind of sense 
of humor. Apparently, as Ray commented 
at the time: "People are taking life pretty 
seriously these days, I guess." 

For a growing cult, however, life didn't 
really get serious imtil Bob and Ray left 
the air. To their fans — as well as to most 
critics — this apathetic, dead-pan pair were 
the funniest combination in radio and TV. 
They could not only make you laugh at 
them, they could make you laugh at your- 
self. And if people were no longer able 
to do that — if there were suddenly no room 
for these two in network progrsimming— 
then we were truly lost, and something 
clean and sweet and refreshingly tonic 
had vanished from the national scene. 

Last April 11, however, the world could 
breathe easier. CivUization was saved! Bob 
and Ray returned to network TV — their 
first important show in three years — as 
dual moderators of ABC-TV's popular 
panel show. The Name's The Same. 

While their own nanies are not the same 
— and they certainly don't look alike — 
there is confusion, nonetheless, about 
which is Bob and which is Ray. The rea- 
son may well be that they act alike. Each 
has the same bland stage personality — even 
to the straight-faced style of delivery, and 
the professional wit's horror of ever being 
caught laughing at his own jokes. Although 
they have burlesqued an amazing variety 
of characters in their radio and TV shows, 
either could take over the other's roles or 
speak his lines. For — vmlike other comedy 
teams, where one plays straight and the 
other gets the laughs by insulting him — 
Bob and Ray both play the cutup. They 
are as one, for their battle is not with each 
other — it's with all the stuffed shirts of the 
world. Like the Katzenjammer Kids . . . 
only, which is Hans and which is Fritz? 

In the case of Bob and Ray, the surest 
way to tell them apart is to look for the 
one with a mustache. That's Ray. He is 
also the taller, darker, and older of the 
two. Bom in Lowell, Massachusetts, on 
March 20, 1922, he was seventeen when he 
was graduated from high school and got a 
job as an announcer at a local radio sta- 
tion. (Salary: $15 a week.) A year or so 
later, he visited near-by Boston and au- 
ditioned for two stations there. When he 
returned home, two telegrams were wait- 
ing. Both stations had hired him. Ray took 
the job at WEEI because it paid five dollars 




OPPORTUNITIES 



FOR EVERYBODY 



Pubrisher's Classified Department (Trademark) 




For classWed advertising rales, write to William R. Stewart, 9 South Clinton Sfreef, Chicago 6 (Ju/y-Wom.) 5 



FEMALE HELP WANTED 

EXTRA MONEY EVERY week. I'll send you full-size Blair 
Household products on Free Trial. Show them to friends 
and neighbors. You can make Big Extra Profits. Write Blair, 
Dept. 185NL, Lynchburg, Va. 

StWFORBIG MONEYI Women 18-60 wanted. Earn to $100 
weekly. Experience unnecessary. Free placement service. 
Factory secrets, methods. Complete information, write Gar- 
ment Trades, 641 1-B Hollywood Blvd.. Hollywood 28, Calif. 
BEAUTY DEM ONSTRATORS : UP to $5 hour demonstrating 
Famous Hollywood Cosmetics, your neighborhood. Free 
samples and details supplied. Write Studio-Girl, Dept. P-74, 

Glendale. Calif. 

MAKE MONEY INTRODUCING World's cutest children's 
dresses. Big selection, adorable styles. Low prices. Complete 
display free. Rush name. Harford, Dept. N-8359, Cincinnati 

25, Ohio. 

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS. WORK at home. Part-time, 
full-time. All ages. Write Dept. 81. Webster-Kerr, 120 Elm 

Street, Orange, N. J. 

HOME WORKERS. MAKE hand-made moccasins. Good 
pay. Experience unnecessary. California Handicrafts, Holly- 

wood 46, California. 

hOME WORKERS WANTED! Self employment home jobs 
listed. $20 - $50 weekly possible. No experience necessary. 

Maxwell, Dept. B-7, Cleveland 14, Ohio. 

EARN EXTRA MONEY— Our instructions tell how. A. B. 
Dunbar, Dept. G-7, 4130 Mark Terrace, Cleveland 28, Ohio. 
WOMEN. SEW READY-Cut Wrap-A-Round, spare time- 
profitable. Dept. D, Hollywood Mfg. Co., Hollywood 46. Calif. 
FASCINATING PIECE WORK at Homel No sellingl We 

pay youl Truart, Box 438, Pasadena, California. 

ENJOY EXTRA INCOME sewing Baby Shoes, Dresses for 

established markets. Thompson's, Loganville 2, Wis. 

$30.00 WEEKLY MAKING Roses. Easy. Write, Studio 

Company, Greenville, 7, Penna. 

PERSONAL 

BORROW BY MAIL. Loans $50 to $600 to employed men 
and women. Easy, quick. Completely confidential. No endors- 
ers. Repay in convenient monthly payments. Details free in 
plain envelope. Give occupation. State Finance Co., 323 Se- 

curities BIdg., Dept. G-69, Omaha 2, Nebraska. 

PSORIASIS VICTIMS: HOPELESS? New Discoveryl Free 
Trial Offer. Write Pixacol, Box 3583-C, Cleveland, Ohio. 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

WOMEN I SEW READY-Cut Neckties at Home. No experi- 
ence Necessary. No Selling. No Machine Needed. Details 
Free. Neckwear Supply, P.O. Box 2066-P, Inglewood 4, Calif. 
$70 WEEKLY— HOME, spare time. Simplified mail Book- 
keeping. Immediate mcome — easy! Auditax, 34757CP, 
Los Angeles 34. California. 

EARN $25 -$75 WEEKLY Mailing Circulars. Complete 
details— 25c. Siwaslian, 4317-F Gleane. Elmhurst 73, N.Y. 
$200 WEEKLY CLEANING Venetian Blinds. Free book. 

Burtt. 2434BR, Wichita 13, Kansas. 

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES 

DENTAL NURSING, PREPARE at home for big pay career. 
Chairside duties, reception, laboratory. Personality Develop- 
ment. Free Book. Wayne School. Lab: BA-14, 2521 N. Shef- 
field. Chicago 14. Illinois. 

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA at home. Licensed teachers. 
Approved materials. Southern States Academy, Box 144W 
Station E, Atlanta, Georgia. 

COMPLETE YOUR HIGH School at home in spare time 
with 58-year-old school. Texts furnished No classes. Di- 
ploma. Information booklet free. American School, Dept. 

XB74, Drexel at 58th, Chicago 37, Illinois. 

SALESWOMEN WANTED 

ANYONE CAN SELL famous Hoover Uniforms for beauty 
shops, waitresses, nurses, doctors, others. All popular miracle 
fabrics — nylon, ciacron, orlon. Exclusive styles, top quality. 
Big cash income now, real future. Equipment free. Hoover, 

Dept. R-119, New York 11, N.Y. 

DENTAL PLATE RENEWAL & REPAIR 

NEW FALSE DENTAL Plate. Guaranteed Dupont Plastic 
from old. $18.95. Free details. All-State Dental Laboratories, 

22 West Madison, Dept. 650. Chicago. 

HOME STUDY TRAINING 

PHYSICAL THERAPY PAYS Big Profits. Learn at home. 
Free Catalog. National Institute, Desk 6, 159 East Ontario, 
Chicago 11 



MONEY MAKING OPPORTUNITIES 

GROW MUSHROOMS, CELLAR, shed. Spare, full time, 
year round. We pay $3.50 lb. We paid Babbitt $4165.00 in few 
weeks. Free Book. Washington Mushroom Ind., Dept. 164, 

2954 Admiral Way, Seattle, Wash. , 

SELL -BUY TITANIA gem; $9 75 carat wholesale. Mora 
brilliant than Diamonds. Free catalogue. Diamonite, 1404-H, 

Oakland 1. California. ^ 

60% PROFIT COSMETICS. $25 day up. Hire others. 
Samples, details. Studio Girl — Hollywood, Glendale, Calif. 

Dept. P-75b. 

STUFFING - MAILING ENVELOPES. Our instructions tell 
how. Dept. G-7, Education Publishers, 4043 St. Clair, Cleve- 
land 3, Ohio. 

MAKE YOUft TVPEWRITEH Earn Money. Send $1.00. 
Hughes, 7004 Diversey, Chicago 35. 

GUARANTEED PAY HOMEWORKI No Selling. Every- 
thing Furnished. Genmerco, Box 142P, Boston 24, Mass. 
EARN MONEY AT Homel Must Have good Handwriting. 

Write for Details. Atlas, Box 188-A, Melrose. Mass. 

EARN SPARETIME CASH at home, preparing mailings for 

advertisers. Tem-Let, Box 946. Muncie 2, Indiana. 

EARN SPARE TIME cash mailing advertising literature. 

Glenway, 5713 Euclid, Cleveland 3, Ohio. 

SEND OUT POSTCARDS. Cash daily. Write Box 14, Bel- 
mont, Massachusetts. 
OF INTEREST TO WOMEN 

f200 for your child's photo (all ages) If used by advertisers, 
end one small photo for approval. F'rint child's and parent's 
name -address on back. Returned 30 days. No obligation. 
Spotlite, 5880-GPW Hollywood, Hollywood 28, California. 
MATERNITY STYLES— FREE Catalog (Plain Envelope); 
fashions by famous designers; $2.98 to $22.98. Crawford's, 

Dept. 28, 8015 Wornall, Kansas City, Missouri. 

$2.00 HOURLY POSSIBLE doing light assembly work at 
home. Experience unnecessary. Crown Industries, 7159-B 

Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles 36, Calif. 

EARN EXTRA MONEY Weekly Mailing Display Folders. 
Send stamped, addressed envelope. Allen Company, War- 

saw 1, Indiana. 

FREE, NEW DIRECTORYI 314 Companies looking for 
people to work at home. O. Economy. Rowley. Mass. 
SEW OUR READY cut aprons at home, spare time. Easy, 

Profitable. Hanky Aprons. Ft. Smith 3. Arkansas. 

PROFITABLE HOME BUSINESS. Make Fast-selling che- 
nille monkey trees. Literature free. Velva. Bohemia 32. N.Y. 
EARN SPARE TIME cash mailing advertising literature. 

Glenway. 5713 Euclid. Cleveland 3, Ohio. 

SEND OUT POSTCARDS. Cash daily. Write Box 14, Bel- 
mont. Mass. 

HOME SEWERS WANTED 

SEW BABY SHOES at home. No canvassing. $40.00 weekly 

possible. Write: Tiny-Tot. Gallipolis 19, Ohio. 

OLD COINS & MONEY WANTED 

$40.00 CERTAIN LINCOLN Pennies. Indianheads $60.00. 
Others $5.00 - $3,000.00. Complete Catalogue Everything 25c. 
Illustrated Catalogue 50c. With Samples Coin Conditions 
$1.50. Worthycoin Corporation. Boston 8. Massachusetts. 
WE PURCHASE INDIANHEAD pennies. Complete allcoin 
catalogue 25c. Magnacoins, Box 61 -DH, Whitestone 57, 
New York. 

MALE & FEMALE HELP WANTED 

EARN EXTRA MONEY selling Advertising Book Matches. 
Free sample kit furnished. Matchcorp, Dept. WP-15, Chi- 

cago 32, Illinois. ^^^ 

HELP WANTED 

FOREIGN - U.S. JOB Information Directory. So. Pacific, 
Alaska, Canada, So. America, Europe, Africa, Spain. Un- 
skilled - Skilled - Office. Contractors names, locations, 
addresses, amounts listed. Stamped self-addressed envelope 
appreciated. Job Information, (11E). Waseca. Minnesota. 

NURSING SCHOOLS 

PRACTICAL NURSING— LEARN Easily at Home, Spare 
Time. Big demand, good earnings. High School not necessary. 
Write for free booklet. Wayne School, Dept. AW-20, 2525 

Sheffield, Chicago 14, III. 

ADDITIONAL INCOME 

EARN READY CASH doing mailing work. No experience 
needed — F. Wilson Business Service, 2875 Glendale Blvd., 
Los Angeles 39, California 



Thrilling New Massage Cream 
Contains PC-11. Acts Instantly to 

DRY UP SKIN 
BLEMISHES 

From Both Oily Skin and 
External Causes! 

Have you tried in vain to get rid 
of oily pimples, "hickies," other 
externally caused skin blemishes ? 
f Well, you never had PC-11 be- 
fore! That's POMPEIAN'S name 
^ for Hexachlorophene. Wonder- 
ful discovery of science helps dry up such skin 
blemishes! Acts instantly to clean out dirt, helps 
remove blackheads like magic! Goes on face pink — 
rolls off muddy gray ! 

GENEROUS TRIAL TUBE— 10 CENTS! 
Send name, address and 10 cents to POMPEIAN 
CORP., Dept. p. 7, Baltimore 24, Md. (Offer good 
only In U.S.) Or get Pompeian Mas- 
sage Cream at any drug store. 



POMPEIAN 

MASSAGE CREAM 






Why be blue 
when you can 

/ 




If monthly distress— pain, 
cramps, nervous tension 
and lieadache — get you 
down, be smart and try 



CHI-CHES-TERS 



If you don't get safe, quick, long-lasting relief we 
will refund your money. Fair enough? Get Chi- 
Ches-Ters and compare this medically proven, pre- 
scription-like "wonder" formula with any other 
product you have used. In doctors' tests 9 out of 
10 women got relief— often with the first dose. Why 
not you? Feel gay every day with Chi-Ches-Ters. 
Purse Pak 50jS; Economy Sizes $1.15 and $2.25. 
If your druggist hasn't any, ask him to get some 
for you— or we will fill direct orders. T 



FREE — Illustrated booklet of intimate facts 
every woman should know. Mailed in plain 
wrapper. Write today! Chichester Chemical 
Company, Dept. 19-S, Philadelphia 46, Pa. 



V 
R 

75 



more a week. By 1942, when he left to en- 
ter the Army, he was already a veteran 
announcer. 

It was at Fort Knox, Kentucky, where 
he was instructing in the Officers' Candi- 
date School, that Ray met Liz — only she 
was Lieutenant Mary Elizabeth Leader 
then, a dietitian. "We got married on a 
three-day pass," Ray recalls, "at a little 
spa in Indiana. A sweet little church 
around the corner — around the corner 
from an arsenal." 

A year later, in 1946, Ray Goulding 
returned to Boston, joined Station WHDH 
— and met Bob Elliott. 

Bob was born on March 26, 1923, in 
Winchester, Massachusetts. After gradua- 
tion from high school in 1940, he attended 
the Feagin School of Dramatic Art in New 
York City. "I thought I might become an 
actor," he explains. A year later, at eight- 
een, he auditioned at Boston's Station 
WHDH and got a job as staff announcer. 
(Salary: $18.50 a week.) la 1943, he joined 
the Army, serving three years with the 
26th Infantry Division. 

Ask him about his Army career, and 
Bob reacts like a war prisoner who's only 
obliged to give his name, rank and serial 
number. "I was a T/5 in Regimental Spe- 
cial Service," he says. 

"Oh, you entertained troops?" you say. 

"I ran movies," he says. 

And then Ray, who understands Bob's 
reticence in speaking about himself, tries 
to help. "He was a malingerer," he says. 

You have to consult the record to find 
out: Bob took part in the Battle of the 
Bulge. 

After his discharge in 1946, he returned 
to WHDH, where he w^as given two disc- 
jockey shows — one in the morning, one in 
the afternoon. Ray Goulding was as- 
signed to do the newscasts on the morning 
show. After completing his chores, he got 
in the habit of hanging around and kidding 
with Bob. That's how it began — casually, 
impromptu, without scripts or rehearsals, 
but just for fun. And that's how it's con- 
tinued ever since. 

Soon, their off-hand remarks had ex- 
panded into ad-lib sketches, then into a 
daily half-hour show ("just before the ball 
game") . . . and, finally — to meet audience 
demand — another show had to be added in 
the morning. After five years of this in 
Boston, word of the new comedy team 
reached New York. It was in July, 1951, 
that the audiences of two network shows 



started hearing: "Bob Elliott and Ray 
Goulding take pleasure in presenting the 
National Broadcasting Company, which 
presents The Bob And Ray Show." 

Two months later, they were given the 
morning show on NBC's local station in 
New York. Then two more network shows 
were added to an already impossible 
schedule. But even Bob and Ray can no 
longer remember all the shows they ap- 
peared on for NBC — both local and net- 
work, radio and TV — until the spring of 
1953. Many of these shows were on daily — 
five to six times a week — so that, for sheer 
quantity. Bob and Ray set some sort of 
record. But there was quality, too. In 1952, 
they won a George Foster Peabody award 
for "best in radio entertainment." And 
even more gratifying, according to Ray, 
was "the testimony of returning GIs from 
all over the world who continue to report 
The Boh And Ray Show among the most 
popular on the Armed Forces Network." 

To explain their popularity (about f^- 
teen million people every week) , it is nec- 
essary to explain the Bob and Ray brand 
of humor. They practice an art that has 
almost vanished from our time: the art 
of satire. It's the highest form of comedy 
and the healthiest, for it uses ridicule to 
expose the follies of the times. For ex- 
ample, you have only to listen to some 
Bob and Ray commercials to know what's 
wrong with so much radio and TV adver- 
tising. But you don't get mad about it. You 
laugh. It's criticism, but it's good-natured. 

Since Bob and Ray work without a 
script, many of their most inspired mo- 
ments are unrecorded. One critic, however 
— Philip Hamburger, of The New Yorker 
magazine — happened to be listening with 
pencil in hand one night. "Bob and Ray 
generally finish up their program," he 
wrote, "with a plug for one of their seem- 
ingly endless supply of (imaginary) prod- 
ucts. The other night it was Woodlo, a 
product 'all America is talking about.' 
Speaking rapidly, Bob and Ray said that 
Woodlo was the sort of product 'that ap- 
peals to people who.' Moreover, it was 
'immunized.' 'You can buy Woodlo loose!' 
one of them cried. 'Yes, mothers and dads!' 
cried the other. 'Available at your neigh- 
borhood!' cried Bob. 'Drop in on your 
neighborhood!' cried Ray." 

In a simpler vein: "For the fellow who 
can brush his teeth only once a year, we 
recommend steel wool." 

But Bob and Ray not only lambaste ad- 



$1,000.00 REWARD 



... IS offered for information leading 
to the arrest of dangerous "wanted" 
criminals. Hear details about the 
$1,000.00 reward on . . . 

TRUE DETECTIVE MYSTERIES 

Every Wednesday Evening on MUTUAL 
Stations 



The Oklahoma killer asked for a mercy he had not shown 
his 4 victims. Read "I Want to Die Quickly and Privately" 
in July TRUE DETECTIVE MAGAZINE at newsstands now. 




vertising, they lampoon the programs 
themselves. Playing all the roles, their 
"dramatic interludes" have included such 
gems as: Mr. Trace, Keener Than Most 
Persons (with one thrilling episode, "The 
Leaky Refrigerator in the Efficiency 
Apartment Murder Clue"), Jack Head- 
strong, the All-American American (he 
was making an inter-planetary motor- 
cycle), and Mary Backstayge, Noble Wife 
(the daytime drama that has supplanted 
The Life and Loves of Linda Lovely, since 
they killed off all the people in that one). 

Then there's Mary McGoon, the com- 
posite of all women commentators and 
home helpers. Her cure for a cold? "Goose- 
fat in an Argyle sock, hung aroimd the 
neck." Dining-room etiquette? "No, 
friends, beer should not be served in fin- 
ger bowls. For quiet elegance, serve it 
in demi-tasse cups." 

Curiously enough, no one has ever ob- 
jected to their satire. In fact, the victims 
are delighted. Edward R. Murrow, for ex- 
ample, vows that if ever there's a me- 
chanical difficulty or something goes 
wrong on his Person To Person show, he's 
going to run a kinescope of the take-off 
Bob and Ray did. Instead of going inside 
the home, "Edward R. Sturdley" (there's 
always a character named Sturdley in 
their shows) went outside his first celeb- 
rity's home. It was a "human fly" — and 
visiting him, person to person, the TV 
camera looked 'way up at a tall building 
and there, on top, was the "speck of a 
guy." The second celebrity visited was "a 
guy in jail." Showing the TV audience 
where he lived, "Edward R. Sturdley" 
pointed out the writing room, the warden's 
office, the place where the celebrity re- 
ceived visitors, etc. . . . 

For TV, Bob and Ray had to augment 
their cast of two to include an actress for 
the women's parts. Making her TV debut 
with them at NBC was Audrey Meadows 
(Jackie Gleason's wife in "The Honey- 
mooners") who is now one of their perma- 
nent panelists on The Name's The Same. 

In 1953, Bob and Ray switched to 
WABC-TV (New York) for a five-times- 
a-week show. In the simimer of 1954, they 
took over the early morning show (6:30 
to 10:00) at New York's Station WINS, 
which they still continue in addition to 
their current TV show. While this is still 
a heavy schedule, to Bob and Ray — after 
their marathon performances of several 
years ago — it is like a vacation. And now, 
there is time at last for the one thing that 
both take seriously. . . . 

Last June, Bob married the former Lee 
Knight — a beautiful non-professional. They 
live in a charming Greenwich Village 
apartment with three children: Two by a 
previous marriage, and a baby born this 
May. Bob's one hobby is painting — water 
colors and oils — and he has had some ex- 
hibited at the Contemporary Galleries in 
Manhattan. 

Ray, on the other hand, goes in for pho- 
tography. His main subjects are Raymond, 
age nine; Thomas, six; and Barbara, three 
— for Ray is trying to keep a pictorial rec- 
ord of his children's "growing up." Most- 
ly, however, he and Liz enjoy puttering 
around their new home in Plandome 
Manor, Long Island. 

If Ray seems a more contented man than 
most, it is because he has had proof — 
while still alive — that he is not only loved, 
but that his family actually follow him on 
radio and TV. He and Bob were doing a 
burlesque of Truth Or Consequences. Ray 
did not -know the answer. For his conse- 
quence. Bob nailed him up in a box and 
poised it on a window ledge — ready to 
push it into the Hudson River below. Ray's 
children never waited to see whether Bob 
pushed the box or not. They were already 
running out of the living room to go save 
their daddy. 



This Life I Love 

(Continued from, page 41) 
But Willy must make good for my hus- 
band and for Lucy and Desi. too." 

Willy is a Desilu Production — and not by 
chance. 

"Lucille Ball is one of my oldest and 
most violent friends," June says. The vio- 
lence refers to Lucille's super-abundant 
enthusiasm. Lucy has definite ideas about 
what her friends should be doing and 
never stops promoting until they get to 
doing it. "She gives not only advice but 
opportunity, too. While she's selling you on 
doing a show, she's selling a producer on 
hiring you." 

Lucy gets credit for promoting quite a 
few people into stardom. The hst includes 
Van Johnson, June Allyson and June 
Havoc. Back in the Forties, Lucy thought 
Miss Havoc should come to Hollywood, and 
so Miss Havoc made twenty-six films. 

More recently, Lucy decided June should 
have a television program, so she and 
Desi got together with June's husband Bill 
Spier, who is a famed producer in radio 
and TV. Together, they tailor-made Willy 
for June. It is comedy-with-heart about a 
pert, gentle woman lawyer. 

"But the decision to make Willy came 
so suddenly," June recalls. "We were 
about to settle in a new house.'' The house 
is a brownstone in "Buskin Hill" in Man- 
hattan. The street, off Park Avenue, is fast 
becoming an actors' colony — Maria Riva 
and Alfred Drake live there. The idea is to 
get a theatrical friend to buy into the 
block every time a "civilian" sells. 

"Bill had been paying about $350 a 
month rent and so I asked myself why 
shouldn't he be paying me. instead of a 
stranger, sind I bought the building." Her 
building has an apartment on every floor, 
and the landlady has the first floor. It has 
not yet been furnished — for, exactly one 
week after its purchase, June and Bill 
came to Hollywood to film Willy. Since 
June has been spending most of her time 
in either New York or Hollywood, she 
bought a second house — this time, in Bev- 
erly Hills. It's a two-story, gray stucco 
with white trim. June is in love with it and 
calls the architecture "forever style." It 
is a large house with so many windows 
June had to store most of her paintings. 

1 here's a reason for all the glass," June 
says. "The former owner spent twenty- 
thousand dollars on plants, shrubs and 
landscaping. He wanted to enjoy it whether 
he was in or out of the house." 

She taikes no credit for the gardening, 
but the interior is all her doing. Perhaps 
most striking is the drawing room, fur- 
nished in black and white contrasts with 
jvist a Uttle tangerine for accent. June 
does all of her own planning and deco- 
rating, and just about makes the furniture 
herself. A lot of her stuff came from Bar- 
ker Brothers' Basement, a kind of second- 
hand shop in Los Angeles where everyone 
sells their own furniture and buys some- 
one else's. 

"I got an impossible Jacobean style 
that no one else in the world would want," 
June notes. At home she stripped down the 
chairs and sofa and put on new fabric 
cove.-s so they would mix with modern. 
She figures the average cost per chair was 
about five dollars. 

June will buy no more houses, for she 
has no desire to be a realtor. To her, as 
to most actors, a house represents security, 
and that is about all. "As a landlady, I try 
to be fair," she says. "I charge Bill only a 
single rental. Just for the home his wife 
lives in." 

Bill Spier, in the Avords of his wife, is 
"tall, dark and woolly." He has a crew- 
cut beard which conspicuously covers 



ASK YOUR 

DOCTOR 



DRUGGIST 



'X^ 



If you want to 

BANISH BAD BREATH AND 
BODY ODOR PROBLEMS FOREVER 

_Try -ENNDS"^ Tablets containing 

DarotoP-the only deodorant that gets to the 

source of both problems •internally 



,,j , ^iaffiiise" can assure you of 

Neither a eho«er no, a "J,"*;"" ''XS. •■£•■»»»'■ TaW". 

or mask external symptoms. 

^1 ^ ^f the most potent essences 

"ENNDS" contain D^f ^V'^'^^^^tnt Me. The Darotol in 

of ChlorophyU ever ^f^'^^^^Jl^rM and where deodorant 
-Ennds'' acts mternaHy, where odors St ^^^^^. ^^^^ 

sprays, creams, niouthwashes, e*^-' ^^ ^^„,, i„ general are 
from foods, liquors, ^^°^l^^^^^ ^°J\,y coming out on your 
checked before they can embarrass you y 
breath or through your pores. 

Safe, pleasant -tasting "Ennds-'J 
do not upset the stomach TVial 
size at all Drug counters only 49 ^ 
The larger sizes are even more 
economical. "Ennds" are also 
available in Canada. 




HELP 



us take orders for magazine sub- 
scriptions and earn lots of money doing it. Write 
today for FREE money-making information. Subscrip- 
tion Sales Dept., 205 East 42 Street, New York 
17, N. Y. 



BIG MONEY 

FOR YOUR TV IDEAS 

T\" Producers are **crying" for your new story ideas, 
' 'CASH IN" on your hidden talent in your spare 
time. Let the "know how" of leading TV writers & 
directors turn your untapped talent into dollars. 
Write for free information & sample script actually 
used on recent TV Show. 

TelecraKers, Inc., 6087 Sunset Blvd.. Columbia Square 
Hollywood 28, California 



DISCOVERED! NEW! Makes 

You Look 10 Years Younger 

By TONIGHT! 

Say "good bye" to gray, 
streaked, dull, drab hair that 
looks old. New TINTZ 
CREME COLOR SHAM- 
POO tint makes hair shine 
with lasting, deep color tone 
so natural-looking no one 
ever suspects the beautiful 
color isn't your own. Easy . . . 
best for home use. Lanolin con- 
ditioner base makes hair softer, 
lustrous, easy-to-dress, wave beau- 
tifully. 14 nature's shades on color chart with every pack- 
age. Ask at drug stores. Money back guarantee. 

TINTZ CREME COLOR SHAMPOO 




High School Course 

at Home 



Many finish m 2 Yeois 

as your time and a^ilitiea permit. TlquivaleDt to resi- 
work — prepares for college entrance esamo. Standard 
. :?. texts aupplied. Diploma awarded. Credit for H. S. subjects 
ompleted. SinKle eubjectu if desired. Aok for Free Bulletin. 

American School, Dept. H B53. Drexel at 58tti, Chicago 37 



JKOSO IS 

Ufc— YOURS 

On Just 
SO Boxes ol 



I HLL'bLUW KODACHROME 

CHRISTMAS CARDS 

Newradiant color creations sell on sight, pay you $1.0S 
perboxlTaUCard3.21&25-Card 51 Assts., Name-In- 
Red Parchment Cards at 3c each, Relisious Koda- 
chromes. 176 fast-sellers. Profits to 100%, plus $10-$50 
in Bonas Gifts! Assortments on approval. Imprints 
Free. Act fast- get $1.00 Gift FREE. Write TODAY 

CREATIVE CARDS, 4401 Cermak Rd., Dept. 86-B, Chicago 23. Illinois 





BE YOUR OWN 
MUSIC TEACHER 

Now lf» EASY to learn ANY INSTRUMENT— even U you 
don't know a single note now. No boring exercises. You play 
delightful pieces RIGHT AWAY-trom very flrrt lesson! 
properly— by note. Simple as A-B-C. You make amazing prog- 
ress — at home, in spare time, without teachOT. — .^^ 
Only few cents per lesson. 000,000 STUDENTSl ^ 
EBee D#%/M# shows bow easy it is to learn 
rKCC WWIi music this modem way. 
Write for It. No obllsatlon; no sBleaman «rtU 
call upon you, U.S. Sdtfiol of Music* Studio A307. 
Port waihinaton. N. V. (STth successful yMr.l 




H 



most of his face. When they first married, 
June's friends spoke of him approvingly, 
with but one qualification. "What about 
that beard?" — as if they expected her to 
sfie that it was shaved off. But it was so 
obvious and June, no trifling wag her- 
self, would stare at them quizzically and 
ask, "What beard?" — and so they only 
sputtered. 

In 1948, Bill and June were married in 
California or out of California. No one 
really knows. They had a big party before 
the wedding, and then Bill and June drove 
off with the wedding cake. But, to this 
day, nobody knows where they were 
married. 

"Bill is unpredictable and charming," she 
says, "with a wonderful gentleness and 
sense of humor." 

William Spier is a producer noted for 
his brilliance. He has produced and/or 
directed many shows, including Sam Spade, 
Philip Morris Playhouse, Omnihus, Sus- 
pense. He has received numerous tributes 
— including three Peabody Awards. ("He's 
so smart. He's a one-man Information 
Please.") At nineteen. Bill was a first- 
string music critic. He plays the piano 
like a concert artist — which he once was. 
But he's so modest that June has to coax 
him to play for guests 

The Spiers live alone. Alone? When 
they owned a beach house at Malibu, they 
had thirty-six birds, three dogs and 
eighteen cats. The disproportionate num- 
ber of dogs is not favoritism. June ex- 
plains, "Cats sleep in heaps, but dogs need 
separate places and make a housing prob- 
lem." 

When they gave up the beach house 
(June says there was so much work keep- 
ing up the polish and everything that it 
was like being in the Navy), they gave up 
most of the animal people. "They kept only 
one dog and three cats — "But I found jobs 
for all the others." June and Mrs. James 
Mason, Pamela Kellino, are the self-ap- 
pointed animal-placement bureaus in 
Hollywood. It is a labor of love, for they 
take no fees from owners or animals. 

June's only dog, at present, is a York- 
shire terrier. She calls him Timothy 
Troll. A troll is a Scandinavian gremlin 
with fire-red hair, a devil's grin and green 
teeth. Timothy has the gremlin look 
minus Technicolor. And there are three 
pot-bellied cats, Cecil, Sam and Kelsey. 
"Cecil is a ham," June tells you. "He is 
always boring our guests with old jokes." 
He turns the radio off and on. The 
Spiers have photographic proof of this 
feat. Cecil is also a patriarch. He takes 
credit for many of the eighteen cats. 

Anyway, the Spiers aren't really alone, 
but June keeps no servants: "I enjoy 
cooking, and Bill's a cinch to cook for. He's 
a meat-and-potato man — except he pre- 
fers rice to potatoes." June is an excep- 
tionally good cook and her recipes have 
appeared in professional cookbooks. She 
comes up with slightly exotic dishes, such 
as Shoyu steak — strips of beef marinated 
for four hours in a mishmash of bourbon, 
soy sauce, ground ginger, garlic and a lit- 
tle sugar, then charcoal-broiled. "Most- 
ly, though, I'm a practical cook," she says. 
"I can make three or four dishes and get 
them on the table hot. And I can do it 
without getting the kitchen in a mess." 

So it doesn't take long to do dishes and 

pots — which is lucky, for they need most 

of the evening to get June asleep: "I'm a 

raving insomniac. Bill reads me to sleep 

with delightful things. Lately it's been 

Dickens." 

June is a high-tension, wound-up-like- 

T an-eight-day-clock type. It's a family 

V trait. Neither she nor her sister, Gypsy 

R Rose Lee, respect normal spans of time. 

They get to talking some evenings and go 

right through the night without blinking 



an eye or fracturing a tongue. And every- 
thing is done with such intensity that many 
times June hasn't known that she was ex- 
hausted until she blacked out. Not sur- 
prisingly, she has many accomplishments. 
She paints, designs, dances, sails, sews, 
decorates, fences, plays top-flight tennis. 
No one knows all the arts, sports, hobbies 
and avocations she has mastered. It's 
quite a thing, for June hasn't been to 
school a day in her life. She went to 
work shortly after she was out of the 
cradle. 

June, a first-generation American, was 
born in Seattle, Washington. Her Nor- 
wegian-born father was a newspaperman 
and the family name was Hovick. Her 
mother was zealously ambitious for her 
children and, at the age of two, June won 
a five-dollar gold piece, first prize for her 
dancing — so she bought a guinea pig. 

She danced at club dates and benefits in 
Seattle and Hollywood. In a film starring 
Mary Astor, June played the part of an 
orphan. She was called on to do a lot 
of crying, and this was accomplished by 
telling her repeatedly that her dog had 
been run over. By this time, June was all 
of three years old. 

She joined (or was joined to) the Henry 
Duffy Players, where she had fifty "sides" 
of dialogue to learn. When she approached 
the age of five, she struck out with an act 
of her own. She has a memento of those 
days: A picture of herself sitting on her 
trunk, inscribed, "Dainty Baby June, the 
Darling of Vaudeville. Reg. U.S. Pat. Off." 
She was Dainty June until vaudeville 
dried up and blew away, and then she was 
just plain June. At an age when she 
should have been puzzled by plane geome- 
try, she was worried about where her 
next buck was coming from. 

She headed for New York and Broad- 
way. She wanted to be an actress. She 
wanted a leading or supporting role — or 
a spear to carry — or just a job in a chorus 
line. While she auditioned and waited, 
she worked as a model and saw service in 
seven dance marathons. (She was us- 
ually a prize winner — once, she and a 
partner split $2500. This was hardly a 
windfall. The marathon ran three and a 
half months and the dancers were on the 
floor seven days a week, twenty-four 
hours a day, with only eleven minutes 
rest in each hour.) 

Those years were not a complete loss. 
She had a bit part in an operetta, "For- 
bidden Melody." She toured with the 
road company of "The Women." She fell 
in with a crowd of young actors who 
talked her into giving up a stock experi- 
ence in Pawling, New York, for a workout 
in the Eastern summer-resort circuit. The 
argument was that Danny Kaye and about 
fifty other big stars had been discovered 
there. 

"I can't think of any time that I worked 
harder," she recalls. At the resort hotel, 
she did a play on Tuesday, a cafe show on 
Wednesday, variety on Thursday, a con- 
cert on Friday, a water show on Satur- 
day, a revue on Sunday — and quit on 
Monday. June quit every Monday for 
two months. "There wasn't an instant of 
privacy. You had to tell jokes at break- 
fast or in the pool or the powder room." 

And, besides, she didn't get discovered. 



Red-letter date: 

JULY 5 

get your copy of 
August TV RADIO MIRROR 



At the close of summer, she went from 
borscht to caviar, and took a role at the 
summer theater in fashionable South- 
ampton. "I was cast as a prostitute." 
she recalls. "I was supposed to be sick 
and done-in, and that's exactly the way 
I felt." 

But her resort-hotel buddies called from 
New York. They had hired a theater for 
a few hours and were inviting producers 
and theater managers — big, important peo- 
ple — to see their acts. Actually, June 
says, "There was only one important per- 
son in the audience that morning, and he 
was Forrest Haring. Everyone else sent 
office boys and receptionists. We didn't 
know that, of course, and killed ourselves 
for more than two hours on the stage." 

The curtain fell and they waited for im- 
portant people to rush back with contracts. 
It was quiet. Then one of the boys came 
back with a message for June that a tall, 
thin man wanted to see her. "In those 
days, I didn't ask questions," June says. 
"The thin man told me to bring the piano 
player along to the Barrymore Theater, 
and I did." 

Oeveral men were seated in the Barry - 
more orchestra seats. June went on the 
stage and sang for them. She sang and 
danced the same specialty numbers she 
had done during the summer. Then a 
mild, soft-spoken man stood up and asked 
her to sing just one un-funny song. 

"I don't know any," she said. 

"I'll give you the words," the man said, 
"and you sing them back." (The man 
was Richard Rodgers, the composer.) 

So she sang a ballad and they asked for 
her phone number. All told, she had 
been on the stage forty-five minutes, and 
that is a long time. 

"I was sick. Not a word from them." 
She remembers, "I went back to that flea- 
bag of a hotel and filled up the bathtub. 
I got in and cried for an hour. Then I 
was called to the phone." 

It was the George Abbott office and they 
wanted her to come over immediately. 
She was signed to one of the leads in 
a new musical which proved to be the 
smash hit, "Pal Joey." That was the fall 
of 1940, and June's star zoomed like a 
kite caught in a March wind. ("There's 
no elation — nothing else in the world — 
to match the feeling when you're in the 
producer's office and they hand you a 
script and say, 'We want you.' ") 

In 1941, June left "Pal Joey" for Holly- 
wood and the movies. She toured Army 
camps during the war and returned to 
Broadway to win the Donaldson Award 
for her performance in "Mexican Hay- 
ride." She played Sadie Thompson in the 
musical version of "Rain." In those days, 
June was essentially a comedienne, flip 
and brassy. She was a blonde bombshell, 
a surefire show-stopper. "I used to stsind 
in the wings listening to the applause and 
ask why? Friends who could really sing 
or dance used to tease me. I knew I was 
a faker with dancing or singing." 

She was sensational as a female rough- 
neck but, unfortunately, found she was 
expected to play the same part off-stage. 
"It got me quoted. I was a star. I had 
fame and I was making a living. It was 
security bom of desperation." 

And this is the guts of the story, for 
June was almost swallowed up by the 
Frankenstein monster she had created. 
She began hating herself and her flip, 
flashy role. She became depressed. She 
withdrew. She dragged herself to parties, 
then hid in corners. One evening at a 
party she was trapped by the late Ger- 
trude Lawrence — "She came up and intro- 
duced herself just as if everyone didn't 
know who she was." 

Miss Lawrence praised June for her 
performance and then said, "The way you 



play comedy makes me think you have the 
makings of a fine dramatic actress." 

June choked, shivered up a sob and then 
splattered Miss Lawrence with tears. The 
great lady said, "I knew something was 
wTong. Let's make a lunch date and talk." 

When they met. June opened up. She 
told all about herself and her problems, 
personal and professional. Miss Lawrence 
imderstood. She had suffered a similar 
experience. "Don't say things because 
people expect you to be shocking. Be 
quiet. Be yourself," she counseled. "And, 
for the next eight or ten years, take only 
dramatic parts and starve a little." 

June took the advice, but has never 
starved. She proved to be as effective in 
drama as in comedy. She has received 
high critical praise for her performance 
in such demanding and difficult stage 
roles as Amy, in "They Knew What They 
Wanted," and for her Sadie Thompson 
in the play — without music. She also took 
an Oscar for her supporting film role in 
"Gentlemen's Agreement." She put a 
curl in the coaxial cable with her TV 
rendition of Eugene O'Neill's "Anna 
Christie." Of course, she has played many 
other heay\^ roles and has even done some 
directing. In the latter job, she had her 
sister Gypsy as one of her stars. (June 
and Gypsy are very close, although both 
are stamped "Handle With Care." Either 
can be explosive. Or conv^ulsive.) 

Off-stage. June's taste in clothes is sim- 
ple. She favors plcdn, tailored clothes 
with a feminine touch — maybe a bit of 
delicate white lace or a slight flare to her 
skirt. She hasn't time to sew these days, 
but continues to design her clothes. 

June is as concerned about Wiily's ap- 
pearance as she is about her own. Because 
Willy was a small-town lawyer in the be- 
ginning, she didn't dress for tomorrow. 
Letters from the female audience — whom 
June refers to as "my ladies'' — complained 
about Willy looking a wee bit dowdy. 
They wanted smarter clothes and June 
gratified them. They didn't like her pony- 
tail, complaining about the wiggle. In its 
place June has a chignon. 

1 here is nothing pat about June's reac- 
tion to the audience. Like all fine per- 
formers, she respects her audience and is 
dedicated to giving her best. She belongs 
to that breed of show people who keep 
going so long as they can walk. 

During a Broadway run. some years 
ago, June was so ill during a performance 
that when she left the theater she col- 
lapsed on the sidewalk. She was so ex- 
hausted that she couldn't even identify 
herself at the moment. And there was 
the year of 1952, when she was playing 
in "Affair of State" on Broadway, as well 
as appearing frequently on the TV pro- 
gram This 7s Show Business. She was 
pregnant and terribly ill. In spite of a 
fever, she played a Saturday matinee and 
an evening show. She alerted only the 
stage manager. After the night perform- 
ance they carted her off to the hospital. 
She missed the Sunday-night program of 
Show Business, but that was unavoidable, 
for she was under anesthesia — and had 
lost her baby. 

If you read Broadway columns, you 
know that June has a teen-age daughter 
who, like mother, aspires to the theater. 
Her name is April and she is studying 
dramatics in New York but insists that 
she doesn't want to trade on her miother's 
prestige. June respects this and does not 
speak of her for publication. 

'T don't give April advice. I don't give 
anyone advice," she says. "Nothing is go- 
ing to separate someone from this business 
if they love it. I am personal proof of 
that." She adds, "When I'm eighty-five, I 
want to be on the stage and be a first- 
rate actress." 



STOP PAIN mmm 

COMBAT INFECTION 
PROMOTE HEALING 



WITH ANTISEPTIO 



Campho-Phen/que 

I (PRONOUNCEO CAM-FO-FIN-EEk) C 



USE IT FOR 

MINOR BURNS.CUTS 

SGRATGHES.ABRASIONS 

Quick! Apply Campho-Phenique at once to minor 
bums from hot cooking utensils, hot water or steam 
. . . stops pain instantly, promotes rapid healing. The 
same thing happens when you use it on minor cuts, 
scratches and abrasions. Campho-Phenique is highly 
antiseptic. Wonderful for fever blisters, cold sores, 
gum boils; to reUeve itching and to guard against 
infecting insect bites. Used on pimples, Campho- 
Phenique helps prevent their spread and re-infection. 




Nagging Backache 
Sleepless Nights 

Often Due to Kidney Slow- down 

When kidneyf unction slows down, manyfolks com- 
plain of nagging backache, headaches, dizziness and 
loss of pep and energy. Don't suffer restless nights 
with these discomforts if reduced kidney function 
is getting you down— due to such common causes as 
stress and strain, over-exertion or exposure to cold. 
Minor bladder irritations due to cold or wrong diet 
may cause getting up nights or frequent passages. 

Don't neglect your kidneys if these conditions 
bother you. Try Doan's Pills— a mild diuretic. Used 
successfully by millions for over 50 years. It's amaz- 
ing how many times Doan's give happy relief from 
these discomforts— help the 15 miles of kidney tubes 
and filters flush out waste. Get Doan's Pills today! 



NEW! 



NAME- 
IN-RED 



63 



FOR YOU! 



PARCHMENT 

CHRISTMAS , 

CARDS f 



You make more money, easily, the 
Southern way! With no experi- 
ence you make $65 on just 65 Iwxes 
of lovely new Southern Hospi- 
tality Christmas Cards. 

Southern Gives You Fast Service 

Show smartest new idea in Christmas 
Cards— at magic 25 for SI selling price. 
UptolOO%cash profit on New/ 
Southern Beauty 21 -Card Si/ 
Assortment . Also new Slim- / 
3im Cards, Gift3_, others. All , 
orders shipped in 24 hours. 
FREE! Exclusive sample j 
I^resentation Book! 4 assort- 
ments sent on approval. Act j 
_ fast, get exquisite Travel Slip- , 
fpersn'Case Free. Send coupon! 



SOUTHERN GREETINGS, Dept.A-31 
478 N. Hollywood St., Momphls 12,Tonn, 



Address.^ 
City 




HAIR ON FACE? 



Quick as a wink, superfluous hair eliminated. Com- 
pletely removes all hair from FACE, arms and legs. 
Checks future growth. Leaves the skin petal-smooth. 




P= I L. ATO R 



Was $5.00 — Now only $1.10 

Like magic. Milady's skin becomes adorable. For the 
finest down or the heaviest growth. Seems miraculous, 
but our 39 years experience proves it is the scientifically 
correct way. Odorless. Safe. Harmless. Simple to apply. 
Superior to ordinary hair removers. For 15 years ZiP 
Epilatorwas J5.00. NOW ONLY $1.10. Same superior 
formula, same size. Good stores or by mail $1.10 or 

kC.O.D. No Fed. tax. Above guaranteed, money-back. I 
JORDEAU INC. Box G-19 SOUTH ORANGE, N. i.A 



ir-Mlniite IVIiracle"Gives 




NewLIFE 



BLONDE 
HAIR! 



Special Shampoo Washes Hair Shades Lighter, 
Safely... Gives It Wonderful, Radiant Shine! 

It's almost miraculous how, without tints, rinses or ugly 
bleached look, you con now safely give your hair the spar* 
kling blonde color that men love. You can do it quickly, easily, 
at home in just II minutes— with BLONDEX. This amazing 
shampoo contains ANDIUA^ for extra lightness and shine. 
Instantly removes dingy film that mokes hair dark. Washes 
blonde hair shades lighter. Gives it lovely lustre. Safe for 
children. Get BLONDEX today at lOc, drug or dept. stores. 



T 
V 
R 

79 




n/^ EXOTIC JEWELRY 



Culture Pearls from Living Oysters! 

The loveliness of this 
Culture Pearl is breath- 
taking In its pink-lustre 
sea shell. Displayed in a 
one-inch diameter show- 
case with beautifully 
marked frame! Extra! 
Reverse side of each see- 
thru frame is ornamented 
with a sprig of deep- 
green fern — symbol of 
long life and eternal hap- 
piness. You'll get compli- 
ments wherever you go! 

Massive Bracelet $1.98 
Necklace to Match 1.98 
Earrings to Match 1.98 
Ensemble of All 
3 Pieces 5.00 



Ge.um. LUCKY STARFISH 



Surrounded by exquisite 
real sea shells and set 
into our own lovely re- 
production of an antique 
watchcase. See-thru un- 
breakable crystal front 
and back! You'll marvel 
at the originality of this 
genuine starfish! Watch- 
case and chain exquis- 
itely finished. A real 
conversation piece! 

Massive Bracelet $1.98 
Necklace to Match 1.98 
Earrings to Match 1.98 
Ensemble of All 
3 Pieces 5.00 



She "FLOATING OPALS 



Great big nuggets of 
fiery genuine opals 
floating in a miniature, 
clear crystal, unbreak- 
able soothsayer's 
GLOBE. Yes! The gem 
ancients claimed had 
magical properties — 
the power to make 
your hopes come true! 
GENUINE OPALS at an 
unbelievable low price. 

Massive Bracelet $1.98 : 
Necklace to Match 1.98 t 
Earrings to Match 1.98 ;' 
Ensemble of All 
3 Pieces 5.00 





'.— V 



COIN BRACELET 




Massive Bracelet $1.98 
Necklace to Match 1.98 
Earrings to Match 1.98 
Ensemble of All 
3 Pieces 5.00 



Genuine 
Foreign Coins 

Seven gold-colored For- 
eign Coins mounted on a 
massive link bracelet. 
A King's ransom that 
you'll see in the most 
exclusive shops at fancy 
prices. These Genuine 
Foreign Coin Bracelets 
are the rage in New York 
and Hollywood. Order at 
our low, low price— today. 



T 
V 
R 



HUSH ORDER TODAY 




1 Mercury Jewelry Co. Dept. 
1 112 Main St., Osslning, N. Y. 


RM-755 [ 

1 


■ Send me the items checked below. ] 
1 $ (No COD) 


enclose I 

1 


■ CULTURED PEARLS 

1 n Bracelet D Necklace D Earrings 


1 

a Set 1 


■ LUCKY STARFISH 

1 D Bracelet D Necklace Q Earrings 


D Set 1 


1 FLOATING OPALS 

1 D Bracelet D Necklace D Earrings 


1 
D Set 1 


■ FOREIGN COINS 

1 n Bracelet D Necklace D Earrings 


I 
O Set I 


■ Name 






1 Pleasa Print 




1 Street 






1 

J City State 

■ prices include Federal Tax— Postage Pr 


■paid 



Cinderella with a Song 



(Continued from page 33) 
From the time she was four, Peggy 
dreamed beyond her means. "I was born 
in Greensburg, Pennsylvania," she says, 
"during the Depression. There was only 
one factory in the town, and, when they 
went on strike, that was it. Half the time, 
my father was out of work." But poverty 
didn't keep Peggy from dreaming: "When 
I was four years old and friends or rela- 
tives asked me, 'What are you going to be 
when you grow up, Peggy?' — I always 
answered, 'A movie star.' I think it was 
my first complete thought." 

Peggy remembers the struggle that goes 
hand-in-hand with the Cinderella tale. 
First, her dad was on relief, and later he 
worked for the WPA. Peggy particularly 
remembers two early hardships: The win- 
ter cold and her lack of proper clothing. 
"Nothing gets so cold as morning snow on 
the road to school," says Peggy. "Most of 
the kids had snow suits — at least, coats 
and bottoms that matched. I didn't. I had 
a few old leftovers. One of them had a 
hole in the seat of the pants. When my 
mother mended it, without realizing, she 
made the patch in the shape of a heart. 
You've heard of people who wear their 
hearts on their sleeves — I sat on mine." 

When she was ten years old, Peggy's 
family moved from Greensburg to Raven- 
na, Ohio. Peggy remembers that trying to 
make financial ends meet was impossible. 
For every item bought, it seemed the fam- 
ily had to give up two of something else. 
But when, at five, Peggy had showed great 
talent, her family and grandmother to- 
gether scraped up twenty-five cents a week 
for dancing lessons. Before the first re- 
cital, Peggy's teacher wanted to display 
this talent with a solo. "I was thrilled," 
says Peg, "but the twenty-five cents a 
week had taken all the money. We 
couldn't afford the costume." 

After school, the other youngsters spent 
the afternoon seeing a ten-cent movie, but 
little Peggy couldn't afford even this small 
luxury. "I was always the one left at the 
desk," she says. It was here that Peggy 
learned to create her own amusements. 
Since she couldn't afford to be entertained, 
she decided to become the entertainer, and 
soon was cast in the lead of the school play. 
Even here, there was early heartbreak for 
Peg. Shortly before the performance, she 
came down with a bad cold. "My family 
couldn't afford to send for the doctor," says 
Peggy, "so I even had to miss out on this 
show. But I didn't give up. I had learned 
every line in that play — it wasn't going to 
be wasted. My mother understood. She 
helped me gather makeshift props at home 
and, with her and Dad as an audience, I 
did the show — played all the parts, moved 
every prop, everything!" 

Peggy's parents, Margaret and Floyd 
King, always felt their daughter had great 
talent, but they seldom encouraged her 
toward a show -business career. They 
felt that, to succeed, "You had to know 
somebody." As Peggy grew older, still 
holding fast to her movie -star dream, her 
father would gently discourage her, saying, 
"Baby, don't dream beyond your means." 

In spite of her father's continued dis- 
couragement, Peggy went right on dream- 
ing: "I can't remember the time when I 
didn't want a career. I have always want- 
ed to sing and act. I have to sing and act 
— I have to perform. I would sacrifice al- 
most anything to do this, because it is part 
of me — the biggest part of me." 

It wasn't until after her first big break 
with Charlie Spivak's band that Peggy un- 
derstood the reason behind her family's 
discouragement of her dreams. Her father 
told her then, "I always knew you had 



the talent. Peg. But I hated to think that 
if you continued to try — and failed — some- 
day you'd end up with a broken heart." 

Peggy's family had always had great 
faith in her. It was only out of this sense 
of protection that they had tried to dis- 
suade her. Peggy says, "In spite of the 
discouragement — which I now understand 
— I think my parents did a great job with 
me. We may have been poor — that was a 
big enough obstacle for them to overcome 
— but what we lacked in money we made 
up in love." 

From her experience, Peggy learned that 
it's not only good to dream big dreams, but 
even more important to be specific about 
those dreams, knowing what you want, 
right down to the smallest detail. This 
helps you realize your dreams, because it 
puts first things first. For instance, Peggy 
saw that, if she were to become a profes- 
sional singer, she must first have a ward- 
robe. Wardrobes cost money. Where was 
the money coming from? 

Following high school graduation, Peg 
went to Bohacker's Business College in 
Ravenna. She worked then as a secre- 
tary, continuing to sing "at all the doings, 
and with small bands." At one of these 
affairs, she was spotted and signed — at 
seventeen — for her first professional date at 
the Bronze Room of the Cleveland Hotel in 
Cleveland. But she still didn't have enough 
money for a wardrobe . . . and here's 
where the Cinderella story began to come 
true for Peggy. Every Cinderella has a 
fairy godmother. Peggy's was Miss Sorki, 
the owner of a small Ravenna dress shop. 
Miss Sorki had great faith in Peggy's 
ability, too, and for Peggy's first job ad- 
vanced her three gowns. 

"With my first pair of high-heeled 
shoes," says Peggy, "and my three bor- 
rowed dresses, I began my professional 
career." Peggy, at this point, was very 
much like Cinderella — if she had lost one 
of those slippers, she'd have been out of 
a job! She stretched her wardrobe by 
changing the three dresses around each 
night, adding flowers and different acces- 
sories. Peggy never forgot Miss Sorki's 
help, though it is only recently that she 
has been able to fully repay her first fairy 
godmother. 

The low spot in Cinderella's own story 
always comes when she's returned to the 
scullery. In Peggy's life, this moment had 
to come, too. Not long after she started 
singing in the Bronze Room, she also won 
a job on Cleveland's radio station WGAR, 
as the result of a contest. Peggy found 
herself riding a wave of success— tu>o jobs 
at once! — though she had to work harder 
than any storybook Cinderella: After her 
2 A.M. singing chore at the hotel, Peggy 
arose at 8 A.M. daily for the Open House 
show on WGAR. 

Then the ax fell. Peggy lost both jobs 
at once. During this despondent period, 
she returned home to Ravenna. But she 
continued to tell herself, "I've dreamed 
along this far . . . and I'm not going to 
give up now." With her last five dollars, 
and some money borrowed from her par- 
ents, she started off again for Cleveland 
to make the rounds. 

Again, fate stepped in — as it must, in 
every Cinderella story. First, Peggy missed 
her connecting bus to Cleveland and had 
to stay overnight in Akron. Then she re- 
membered that Akron was her parents' 
honeymoon town, and she searched out 
the little hotel she'd so often heard them 
speak about. Next, while at the hotel, 
she picked up the evening paper and read 
that a previous Cleveland friend, whistler 
Fred Lowrey, was performing at the large 
Akron hotel directly across the street. 



Lowrey had heard Peggy at the Bronze 
Room and had written a glowing letter to 
his friend, bandleader Charlie Spivak. 

Feeling lonely, Peggy called Fred and 
his wife. They immediately invited her 
over, and Fred asked her to stay an extra 
day to see his show. It was at 6 P.M. of 
this second day that the phone rang. It 
was Charlie Spivak. He was in town for 
a one-nighter, he had received Fred's let- 
ter — he wanted to see Peggy about a job! 

When Peggy signed with Spivak, she 
thought her Cinderella dream was truly 
coming within reach — for his band was 
world renowned — but there were still 
some four or five years of struggle ahead 
of her. After eight months with Spivak. 
Peggy was film-tested at Twentieth Cen- 
tury-Fox. Everyone encouraged the move. 
But nothing came of the test, and Peggy 
once again found herself playing small 
club dates in Cleveland. It seemed to her 
then that, for every step she took up the 
ladder of success, she slipped back two. 

X rince Charming came into Cinderella's 
life at this time, in the person of Knobby 
Lee, a young trumpet player with Ralph 
Flannagan's band. Peggy, too, signed with 
Flannagan. She says: "When I was intro- 
duced to the members of the band that 
first day, I thought Knobby was cute. The 
second and third day, I really began to 
look at him. And, on the fourth day, I 
decided he was the man I would marry! 

"This is how it happened: The first night 
we travelled four hundred miles on the 
bus — you can't help getting to know some- 
one well when you sit beside him from 
StillweU, Oklahoma, all the way to Phoe- 
nix, Arizona! Knobby made his first big 
impression when everybody woke up the 
next morning and he was the only one on 
the bus who wasn't grouchy. The second 
morning his rating went even higher in 
my book, when he said, 'Are you still 
tired? Can I get something for you?' It 
isn't hard to see how I knew by the fourth 
day that Knobby Lee was the man for me!" 

Once again, Peggy's dream was coming 
within reach. She and Knobby went to 
New York with Flannagan's band. Thsn 
she sang with Mel Torme, did the first col- 
or TV tests at NBC, and was again spotted 
by the studios, this time by M-G-M. In 

1952, she went to the West Coast for tests. 
And, this time, she was signed by the 
studio, beginning immediately to study 
dramatics, dancing and singing in their 
classes. "The Post Office Department," 
says Peggy, "needed extra help in Culver 
City and New York to handle the mail 
Knobby and I sent back and forth." 

Six months later, after working toward 
his tmion card in New York, Knobby came 
to Hollywood. They were thinking seri- 
ously of marriage, when Peggy went to 
Korea to entertain the troops over Christ- 
mas, 1952 — and, once more, the ladder 
seemed to have been pulled out from 
under her. Korea was colder than the 
snowdrifts in Ravenna, Ohio, had ever 
been. Entertaining the troops on open 
stages, with the thermometer dipping to 
five below zero, was too much for Peggy. 
But she sang for the boys in khaki up to 
the day she passed out. 

Peggy was so sick she very nearly died. 
Confined to her room in Tokyo's Imperial 
Hotel, she desperately fought the virus 
which nearly robbed her of her hearing. 
Debbie Reynolds, Peggy's close friend, 
stayed with her in Japan, nursing her back 
to health. 

Cinderella and her Prince Charming 
finally got together on Peggy's return in 

1953. Their marriage took place February 
2, in the Little Brown Church in San 
Fernando Valley, attended by a small 
gathering of friends. "We only knew about 
thirty people at the time,'" says Peggy. 
■'Since my father wasn't able to be here, 



New! 
DEODORANT DISCOVERY 

Now safely stops odor 24 hours a day! 





Proved in comparison tests mode by a 
doctor. A deodorant without M-3, tested 
under one arm, stopped odor only a few 
hours. Yet New MuM with M-3, under other 
arm, stopped odor 24 hours ! M-3 clings to 
skin, destroys odor bacteria all day long. 

New MUM 



New MUM with M-3 won't irritate normal 
skin or damage fabrics. Originally a doc- 
tor's formula, New MuM contains no harsh 
astringents, will not block pores or rot fab- 
rics. Creamier, won't dry out in jar. Use 
New Mum daily. 



cream deodorant 
with long-lasting M-3 

(hexachlorophene) 




';;■ 

Anoihi.T finf Product 
of Bristol-Myers 



Elsa Maxwell's 
Etiquette Book 

This Famous Hostess Writes About Good Manners 




Elsa Maxwell 



Good manners are one of 
the greatest personal as- 
sets you can possess. 
Good jobs, new friends, 
romance, and the chance 
to influence people can be 
won with good manners. 
Ladies and gentlemen are 
always welcome . . . any- 
where. And the most 
encouraging thing about 

good manners is that anyone can possess 

them. 

Go Places — With Good Manners 

Elsa Maxwell's new book is different 
from the usual dry-as-dust etiquette 
volume. It's gay! It's up-to-date! It's just 
chock-full of the type of information you 
can put to immediate use. It brings you 
a thorough social education, that will 
enable you to live a richer, happier life. 
Here in clear, straightforward language 
are the answers to all your everyday eti- 
quette problems. Here you find importcint 
suggestions on good manners in restau- 
rants — in church — in the theatre — on the 
street — and when you travel. 
In this book Elsa Maxwell covers every 
phase of engagements and weddings. Here 
is everything you need to know about in- 



vitations, gifts, the wedding dress, the 
attendants, the reception, etc. The bride 
who follows the suggestions contained in 
this up-to-date book need have no wed- 
ding fears. She will be radiant in the 
knowledge that her wedding is correct in 
every detail. 



ONLY $1.00 




You owe it to yourself 
to have the information 
contained in Elsa Max- 
well's Etiquette Book. 
The price of this splen- 
did book is only $1.00 
postpaid. Order TODAY. 



«■ — " —i 

BARTHOLOMEW HOUSE, INC.. Dept. RM-755 ■ 
205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Send me postpaid a copy of ELSA MAX- 
WELL'S ETIQUETTE BOOK. I enclose 
$1.00. 

NAME 

Please Print 

STREET 

CITY 

STATE 

I.........----.....--...--.. 



SURVEY SHOWS ANSWERS FROM 




82 
mi 



NUKoto suggest 

DOUCHING ^,h 
ZONITE/or 

feminine hygiene 

Brides-to-Be and Married Women 
Should Know These Intimate Facts 

Every well-informed woman who 
values her health, physical charm 
and married happiness, knows how 
necessary a cleansing, deodorizing 
douche is for intimate feminine clean- 
liness and after monthly periods. 
Douching has become such an es- 
sential practice in the modern way of 
life, another survey showed that of 
the married women asked — 83.3% 
douche after monthly periods and 
86.5% at other times. 

It's a great assurance for women to 
know that zonite is so highly thought 
of among these nurses. Scientific tests 
PROVED no other type liquid anti- 
septic-germicide for the douche of all 
those tested is so powerfully ef- 
fective yet so SAFE to body tissues. 

ZONITE's Many Advantages 

ZONITE is a powerful antiseptic- 
germicide yet is positively non-poi- 
sonous, non-irritating. You can use 
it as often as needed without the 
slightest risk of injury. A zonite 
douche immediately washes away 
germs and waste deposits. 
It effectively deodorizes and 
leaves you with a wonderful 
sense of well-being and con- 
fidence — so refreshed and 
dainty. Inexpensive — zonite 
costs only a few pennies per 
douche. Use as directed. 



es away 
w/mm- 



ZONITE— the Ideal 'ALL-PURPOSE' 
Antiseptic-Germicide 



Mr. Reynolds, Debbie's father, gave me 
away, and Debbie stood up with me. 

"At the church, poor Knobby thought I'd 
changed my mind. He was left waiting 
at the altar for eighteen minutes — we were 
halfway there, with Mr. Reynolds driving, 
when Debbie remembered we'd left the 
flowers at home! We were all so anxious 
to get back to the church, that Mr. Rey- 
nolds accidentally drove up on the lawn." 

Although M-G-M dropped Peggy after 
her return from Korea, she had agreed to 
go on one of their tours — so Jimmy Stew- 
art, Vera-Ellen, Bob Ryan and about 
thirty other people were on Peggy's and 
Knobby's five-day honeymoon flight to 
Denver. Romance wasn't exactly proceed- 
ing in traditional storybook style. But, in 
real life, Peggy's Cinderella story was just 
about to come true. 

And it wasn't a pumpkin that did it. 
It was a can of tomato sauce! After re- 
cording the now-famous Hunt's commer- 
cial jingle, which was immediately a great 
hit with listeners, Peggy was called by 
Columbia's vice-president, Mitch Miller. 
But, when he introduced himself over the 
phone, Peggy thought she was being kid- 
ded. "Oh, yes?" she said, "And this is 
Snow White!" 

What she should have said was: "This 
is Cinderella." Peggy's first record with 
Columbia was "The Hottentot Song," an- 
other immediate success. 

It was then that Peggy had to make a 
momentous decision. "I was offered a 
huge sum of money for a program of cross- 
country exploitation," she says. "It was 
a question of that — or an offer to sing on 
a new television show." The new program 
was The George Gobel Show, which had 
not yet been seen by the American public. 

Peggy naturally discussed the decision 
with Knobby. They had long ago reached 
the point in their marriage where they did 
not give one another advice in regard to 
their careers. "In a marriage which in- 
volves two careers like ours," says Peggy, 
"you cannot be running around giving ad- 
vice to each other. I learned this early 
from Knobby, when I wanted to sign with 
an agency. He felt that I shouldn't, be- 
cause of his own experience with them. 
But he told me to go ahead, because if I 
didn't sign — and then lost out on some big 
job — I might think it was because I hadn't 
joined the agency. So Knobby said, 'For 
your peace of mind, sign.' I did, and it 
turned out to be very bad . . . and I had 
nobody to blame but myself. 

"So Knobby and I 'discussed' taking the 
George Gohel Show offer, but he made me 
make the decision on my own. He did 
point out that being seen once a week on 
network TV was more important than 
anything else — including the fantastic offer 
I already had. Knobby Uked the idea of 
the Gobel show, but the decision was still 
mine. 

"And now," says Peggy, "suppose Knob- 
by had advised me not to take the Gobel 
show, and the girl who took it had every- 
thing happen to her that has happened to 
me! Then what would I have done . . .? 
Well," she says in mock seriousness, "I'd 
probably have shot him!" 

Actually, there was more than a touch 
of magic in the way Peggy was signed for 
the George Gobel Show. George, who was 
then unknown to TV, had been looking 
for a singer for his upcoming show, but 
hadn't wanted to audition some 300 sing- 
ers, explaining: "After the first three, 
they all begin to sound alike." 

It was while George was in Chicago 
that Cinderella Peggy's second fairy god- 
mother, Ethel Daccardo, columnist on the 
Chicago Daily News, heard Peggy sing. 
Knowing that George was looking for a 
songstress, she suggested to George they 
get together. "Have you heard this little 



girl named Peggy King?" she asked George 
one day over lunch. 

"No," said George, "I haven't." 

"Well," said Columnist Deccardo, "you're 
in luck. She's guesting on The Saturday 
Night Review." 

"All right," said George, "I'll watch her." 
In the meantime, George listened to Peg- 
gy's recording of "Hottentot," liked it, and 
— fortunately for Peggy — her two numbers 
on the Review were, as she says, "good 
for me." After the show, George called 
his producers, saying, "Get Peggy King . . . 
I want her for the show." Peggy was 
signed — although she'd never met George. 

Their first meeting took place later in 
Hollywood, at Mike Lyman's restaurant. 
Peggy says: "I'd been rehearsing all 
morning — I was a physical wreck. But, 
when I walked in and saw this darling 
little face, I knew I'd made the right de- 
cision!" 

Today, as a result of the George Gobel 
Show, Peggy and Knobby are settled in 
their own little North Hollywood home. 
Knobby is a member of the Liberace band, 
but — since the latter is on the road only 
two or three times a year — he and Peg 
are together constantly. 

"In fact," says Peggy, "we're the great- 
est 'together' family you've ever seen. We 
paint. We practice. Knobby plays his 
trumpet for me — it's the only rehearsal 
I get, music-wise. We shop for furniture 
together. I'm a great one for decorating — 
I even like to decorate the closets! Knob- 
by is responsible for the outside of the 
house — he's got a sea-green thumb. If / 
get near the flowers, they die. As for 
'family,' we've got Mr. McGoo, our short- 
haired miniature dachshund, and tem- 
porarily we also have the long-haired 
Brunhilde. We took Brunhilde as a gift 
for Arthur Hamilton (he wrote my new 
record, 'Any Questions?') then found that 
Arthur was allergic to long-hair dogs! 
Now that she's been with us for a few 
weeks, I'm trying to figure out some way 
for us to keep her. Our business manager 
says she's too expensive for us to keep. 
But Knobby has a birthday coming up; 
maybe I can swing it that way. 

"We've fallen in love with Brunhilde. 
Knobby says now, that if Brunhilde goes, 
he goes with her. I'm sorry to say that 
Mr. McGoo is unimpressed. He spent all 
last week sleeping outside, under Knobby's 
rose bushes. Brunhilde has her bed in- 
side." 

As for a family, Peggy says, "Yes, Knob- 
by and I want children very badly." 

Children are very definitely part of 
Peggy's dream. And there is one other 
part of her dream which hasn't been 
realized: Peggy still wants to be a movie 
star. If her recent test at Paramount is 
any measure, Peggy's dream will soon 
come true. It's hard for her to realize 
that her already hard-earned success as 
a television singing star has made her as 
popular with the fans as one hundred mo- 
tion pictures could. This was proved on 
the night of the Academy Awards, when 
she was chosen to sing "Count Your 
Blessings" on NBC's Oscar show. The 
moment she stepped from the car into the 
mob of stars in the foyer of Hollywood's 
Pantages Theater, the fans raised a great 
cry of "There's Peggy King!" The pho- 
tographers clamored for pictures and more 
pictures. As Peggy says: "I was just there 
to sing ... I hadn't even figured on being 
recognized!" 

"Dreaming beyond her means" has paid 
fairy-tale dividends to Peggy. Cinderella- 
like, she has had hard work and disap- 
pointment in her struggle for success, but 
she has always kept the grand dreams 
foremost in her mind. For Peggy King, 
the grandest dreams have developed a 
happy habit of coming true. 



Honeymoon in the Sun 

{Continued from page 51) 
handed us on a platter, for free. Miami. 
Nassau, Havana. . . ." 

"As a matter of fact, ifs Miami Beach 
and the Sea Isle Hotel— period— and five 
shows to do. This is a honeymoon?" 

"Oh, you don't work ail the time. Just 
being away from New York together is a 
honeymoon," said Jayne. 

That, in essence, is why you watched 
Steve Allen's Tonight show telecasting 
from the pool and private beach of the 
Sea Isle in Miami Beach during the sec- 
ond week in January, and incidentally 
caught some of the most famous acts in 
show business — acts which would have 
cost you a fortune in night-club tabs to 
see and hear. 

Since I was in Miami that week, the edi- 
tor of TV Radio Mirror wired me to hurry 
over to the Sea Isle and find out how 
Steve and Jayne were faring. The story 
published just after their marriage had 
deplored the fact that the Aliens had not 
had time for a proper honeymoon. Now, 
though belatedly, a sequel to that story 
was obviously indicated. 

At the Sea Isle, I was whisked ten 
stories to the desert of rooftop high above 
the Miami Beach waters. "Just follow the 
path to Penthouse A," the elevator oper- 
ator instructed, and sank abruptly out of 
sight. Across acres of gravel, I followed a 
boardwalk to a gate in a cypress fence, 
trucked on through, and found Penthouse 
A, a fenced and patioed bungalow straight 
out of the latest architects' annual. 

As befitted a suite which, during the 
fifty-five-day Miami Beach season, would 
rent for several hundred dollars a day, 
this one had an enormous living room 
complete with everything — including an 
indoor garden — a kitchen and bath, bed- 
room and dressing room, and a solarium - 
patio the size of most people's back yards, 
all walled for privacy so that the occu- 
pants could get tanned all over, if they 
chose to do so. 

In the bathroom, Jayne, clad in a light 
blue bathing suit and a smidgen of a 
sweater, was washing out a pair of Steve's 
shorts in the basin. Another pair hung 
from the shower rod. "Hi," she said. "I'm 
just beating the laundry situation — he 
didn't bring enough shorts. He's out there 
in the siui. Holler if you guys want tea or 
anything." 

Steve, in swim trunks, was basking on 
a lawn couch. They were having their 
honeymoon, all right. 

Steve looked as if he had nothing more 
on his mind than the magazine he was 
holding. And, as I sat down, I could hear 
Jayne singing merrily as she sudsed away 
at his shorts. She had spent three days in 
Nassau, preceding Steve because he was 
tied up with the show and business mat- 
ters, then had flown to Miami to join him. 

Steve's earlier prediction that, with five 
consecutive shows to do, he wouldn't have 
time to play at a honeymoon turned out 
to be wrong. The talent that happened to 
be in town at the time — Milton Berle, 
Gordon MacRae, Henny Youngman, Debbie 
Reynolds, Vaughn Monroe, Gene Baylos, 
George DeWitt, Patti Page, and dozens of 
other top stars — had all been so generous 
with their time that Steve had hardly had 
to work at all. Evenings, he'd kicked the 
show around with his writers and di- 
rectors until show time, then just let it 
roll. This had left Steve and Jayne the 
daylight hours for just txm. and relaxation. 

"Of course," Jayne explained, "he got 
off to a typical Allen start. No sleep the 
night before he got here — because he can't 
sleep on planes. Then a day of confer- 
ences. And then, when anybody else would 




^^'^:j^^. 



LORI 




It sparkles your natural 
hair color with gleaming color- 
highlights. Gives silken lustre, alluring softness. 
Rinses in — shampoos out! 12 beautiful 
shades. 6 rinses 25c, 14 rinses 50?!. 




Colortint adds rich, exciting new color! So much 

more than a rinse — but not a permanent dye! 

Hides gray hairs . . . blends-in bleached, 

streaked or dyed hair. Lanolin-enriched 

to condition as it colors. Choose 

from 10 enchanting shades. 

6 capsules 29?;, 14 capsules 50tf. 



-^wa?- 




COLORTI 

Gorgeous Yearbook Contains All Your Favorite 

TV-Radio Stars 

The gorgeous new TV-RADIO ANNUAL is ••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 

now available to you. This exciting 1955 year • TV-RADIO MIRROR "^P+- RM-755« 

book is better than ever! It covers all the 2205 E. 42 St., New York 17, N. Y. • 

Television and Radio events of the year. ,Send me postpaid, a copy of TV-RADIO. 

You'll enjoy the hundreds of new illustra- . ANNUAL 1955. I enclose 50c. « 

tions and you'll be simply thrilled to read « * 

the behind-the-scenes stories of all your •p°"fVrint * 

favorite stars. Below is a brief description * AJAr <:«'" * 

of this really important Annual: .Aoaress , 

m City State 

NEWS EVENTS OF THE YEAR— The behind-the-scenes ••••••••••••••••••••••••••• 

stories of Eve Arden and Brooks West • Anne Jeffreys and 
Robert Sterling • Florence Halop • Bob Smith • Paul 
Di-ion • Steve Allen and Jayne Meadows • Wally Co.': • 
Jack Webb • Hilton Berle. 



NEW SHOWS OF THE YEAR— Stars new and old, who 
helped make recent history. Robert Q. Lewis • Sid 
Caesar • Imogene Coca • Florian ZaBach • Edgar Bergen 

• George Gobel • Jack Paar • Betty White • Michael 
O'Shea • James Dunn • William Bishop • Eddie ilayehoft 

• Gil Stratton Jr. 

WHO'S WHO ON— Breakfast Club • Father Knows Best 

• Beat Tlie Clock • Two For The Money • The Garry 
Moore Show • Your Hit Parade • The Halls Of Ivy • Our 
Miss Brooks • Masquerade Party • My Favorite Hus- 
band • Fibber McGee and Molly • Lassie • The Big 
Payoff • The Jackie Gleason Show. 

ALL-TIME FAVORITES— Arthur Godfrey . Ozzie and 
Harriet Nelson • Ralph Edwards • Bert Parks • Ten- 
nessee Ernie Ford • Warren Hull • Bill CuUen • Boy 
Rogers • Gene Autry • Red Buttons • Jack Bailey • 
Jack Barry • Ed Sullivan • Art Linkletter • Donald 
O'Connor • Jimmy Durante • Tom Moore. 

GORGEOUS NEW COLOR PORTRAITS OF THE STARS 

— Thrilling 4-color photographs of Liberace • Lucille 
Ball and Desi Arnaz • Eddie Fisher • Gale Storm. These 
full page, true-to-life portraits are so unusual that you 
will want to frame each one of theml 

PLUS — Pictures and biographies from the most beloved 
daytime dramas on radio and TV. 




ONLY 50(t 
WHILE 
THEY LAST 

This sensational 
Yearbook sells out 
practically as soon 
as it IS put on 
sale. Don't be dis- 
appointed this 
year — mail coupon 
above with 50e — 
today I 



T 
V 
R 

83 




PERIODIC PAIN 

It's downright foolish to suffer in 
silence every month. Let Midol's 
3-way action bring you complete 
relief from functional menstrual 
distress. Just take a Midol tablet 
with a glass of water , . . that's 
all. Midol relieves cramps, eases 
headache and chases the"blues." 



"WHATWOMEN WANTTO KNOW" 

a 24-page book explaining menstruation is 
yours, FREE. Write Dept. B-75, Box 280, 
New York 18, N. Y. (Sent in plain wrapper). 



84 




fall into bed, he accepts an invitation to 
the fights — and, furthermore, takes most 
of the staff with him, so nobody gets in 
until dawn. But he's a big boy, and I guess 
he can take it." 

Steve seemed to be taking it very well 
indeed. That very day, for example, he'd 
gotten up at nine (after some late night- 
clubbing earlier that morning) and, roust- 
ing a sleepy-eyed Jayne out of bed, had 
led her down to the surf in front of the 
hotel. There they found some pedal-boats, 
individual sea -scooters with a paddle in 
back which are operated the same way as 
a bicycle. 

Ordinarily, these temperamental little 
machines are used in a pool or quiet la- 
goon, but Steve thought it would be fun 
to try them in the surf. He and Jayne 
capsized two or three times before they 
made it beyond the waves and into the 
quieter, clear green depths of the Atlantic 
offshore. Let us leave them there in the 
sun, paddling about and looking down at 
the pretty little fishes, for a while. . . . 

And now, after a suitable lapse of time, 
let us journey once again to the Sea Isle 
to witness, in person, one of Steve's To- 
night shows: I walked through the chic 
lobby and out into the pool area — and 
found bedlam. What I remembered, from 
a previous visit, as a casual pool and ca- 
bana area — with the beach beyond (and 
beyond that, Atlantic Ocean stretching 
straight to Africa) — was now a writhing 
welter of cables, seething with technicians 
and audience. After a sunny day, the eve- 
ning had gone cool — well, it was down as 
far as fifty-seven, and everyone was wear- 
ing jackets and mink coats. People who 
had braved a 27-degree temperature in 
New York, only twelve hours before, now 
shivered and cursed the unseasonable 
weather. 

Milton Berle came out, frankly engulfed 
in a topcoat, and did a stint for Steve. 
(Said Steve, "Milton may be wearing a 
topcoat, but I'm wearing sport clothes — 
lots of 'em. But I'm darned if I'm going to 
wear a topcoat, sifter everything the Miami 
Chamber of Commerce has done for us. 
After all!") 

Ihen Steve introduced George DeWitt, 
a veteran and famous comedian from a 
near-by Miami Beach night club. DeWitt, 
clad in a $350 suit just delivered from his 
New York tailor, chose to do his stint on 
the low diving board. Perhaps because of 
the chill weather, the laughs were slow in 
coming and he began working harder and 
harder for them. He worked himself right 
off the end of the diving board, in fact, and 
I can still see the look of utter astonish- 
ment on his face as he disappeared below 
camera range. The suit was a total loss, 
but to date Steve has received no bill for 
it. That's pretty typical of the entertainers 
who lent him their services. If they gave 
at all, they gave their all. 

The problems caused by running two 
major network shows (Garroway's Today 
as well as Steve Allen's Tonight) simul- 
taneously, from the same hotel, are best 
described by the Sea Isle's press agent, 
Sam Kaplan. When I caught up with him 
he was a spent and beaten man. 

"Crazy," he said, "just crazy." Of course, 
he and the management had spent weeks 
making plans so nothing could possibly go 
wrong. "They had arranged with the phone 
company for thirty extra trunk lines and 
fifteen extra operators to handle additional 
calls. They had worked out a security pro- 
gram to screen visitors and keep crowds 
of the curious from bothering the artists. 
Then they sent a note to the hotel's resi- 
dent guests, telling them how lucky they 
were to be sitting in on this great show- 
business event, and politely asking their 
cooperation. 

The guests weren't so sure who was co- 



operating with whom, the next morning at 
4 A.M., when pandemonium broke loose in 
the skies above them. It was merely a jet 
pilot and a helicopter rehearsing for one 
of the shows, but it was the end of sleep 
for that night, and from then on the guests 
had the privilege of paying twenty to forty 
dollars a day to live in the swankiest tele- 
vision studio in the world. 

Because that's what it became for one 
week. Kaplan, for instance, was entertain- 
ing an important director at dinner when 
a harassed man in working clothes came 
up to the table and asked plaintively, 
"Who do I see? Where do I put it?" 

"Put what?" asked Kaplan. 

"The alligator, of course." 

Kaplan excused himself and went out- 
side, to find a van containing, sure enough, 
a monstrous — and very much alive — alli- 
gator. "Mr. Allen ordered it this morning," 
the man said. "Shall I put it in the pool?" 

"You'd better tell those people to get 
out first," Kaplan said dazedly. "They 
might scare the alligator and we wouldn't 
want to ruin one of Mr. Allen's props." 

Ihat was the night Allen had a Seminole 
Indian dive into the pool, capture the alli- 
gator and wrestle it onto the poolside 
(while guests scattered hastily). The night 
before, Steve had surprised Mr. Kaplan 
by installing an enormous porpoise in the 
same pool, and allowing Milton Berle to 
crouch on the diving board and lure the 
thing out of the drink with fish. They ran 
out of fish before the porpoise ran out of 
appetite, and had to send to the dining 
room for a number of $4.50 Pompano 
Amandine entrees, complete with lemon 
butter and asparagus Hollandaise, to keep 
the animal quiet. 

The fantastic things that happened be- 
cause Kaplan and the hotel management 
couldn't possibly foresee them were legion, 
and there is no room for them here. These 
things a public relations man can accept 
fatalistically. But what does he do when — 
after all those weeks of careful planning 
against the invasion of unwelcome, un- 
authorized people — Jayne's sister, Audrey 
Meadows, arrives for a show, walks into 
her room, and finds two giggling teen-age 
girls waiting for her, holding out auto- 
graph books? At three in the morning? 
No one ever found out how they got there, 
because they grabbed their autographs and 
disappeared in the maze of corridors. 

But even that incident didn't shake 
Kaplan as much as the one which hap- 
pened next day, when Jayne arrived from 
Nassau. After the thirty trunklines and 
fifteen operators had been installed to han- 
dle the television business, it had been 
decided that all incoming calls would clear 
through a chief operator who would in- 
quire whether the calls were for business 
or personal purposes. Business calls would 
be routed to the staff, personal calls to 
Suite A. 

Very well. Strictly on schedule, Jayne 
turned up at the Miami International Air- 
port, from Nassau, and of course phoned 
the hotel to tell Steve she'd be with him 
in half an hour. To the chief operator she 
said, "Mr. Steve Allen, please." 

"Is this a personal call?" 

"This is Jayne Allen." 

"Is this a personal call?" 

"Look," said Jayne, "I'm Mrs. Allen — 
Steve Allen's wife!" 

"Yes, madam. And is this a personal 
call?" 

After all, how personal can a phone call 
get? 

That long-delayed honeymoon must have 
clicked about as well as any honeymoon 
ever did, for Steve and Jayne immediately 
began planning further junkets— with the 
show. After all, if one honeymoon can be 
so pleasant, why not more honeymoons, 
every three or four months? 



Man of the House 



{Continited jrom page 49) 

It turned out to be a nine-room house — 
half brown shingles, half fieldstone. There 
was a large yard, with a Lombardy poplar 
and peach and crab-apple trees. There 
were even flower beds and the remains of 
an old greenhouse. Inside the house, the 
living room was one-and-a-half stories 
high with a balcony "that has absolutely 
no purpose." But it also had a large 
cathedral window, an open fireplace, a 
beamed ceiling — and, underneath, there 
was a large playroom for the children. 

"Its rapscallion personality appealed to 
us," Herb admits. "We didn't even bother 
to have any architects or engineers in- 
spect the place. We just felt it was right 
for us, so we bought it on sight." And 
although, according to the laws of real 
estate and human nature, the Nelsons 
should have been stung — they weren't. As 
for Shakespeare — whereverfor he art — it 
can't be in heaven . . . because that's 
where the Nelsons are. 

When it comes to raising their children, 
Joan and Herb also "play it by ear." 
"Kids have a peculiar habit of impressing 
you with their needs," he says. "Joan and 
I, for instance — we aren't very authori- 
tarian by nature. It's the children them- 
selves who demand authority, so we give 
it to them as needed. Otherwise, we just 
love them and let them live." 

The result is an obviously happy brood: 
Da\^Ti Ley, going on seven; Erika Joan, 
going on five; and DeWitt, born last No- 
vember. For "playing it by ear" means 
trusting your instincts, as our parents did 
before the day of the "How To — " books. 
And if Herb places such confidence in his 
own instincts, it's because he knows they 
are sound — rooted in the happy, healthy 
home life his own parents gave him. That's 
what he's trying to do for his own chil- 
dren — "love them and let them live" — as 
he was allowed to live when he was a 
child back in Stillwater, Minnesota, 
dreaming that first dream of glory. . . . 

"My mother, Anna Magnusson, of Udde- 
valla, Sweden, and father, Frank Nilsson 
(now Nelson), of Malmo, Sweden, mi- 
grated to America in 1905." According to 
Herb, "Their interest in learning a new 
language was a major factor of life and 
undoubtedly inspired the same deep in- 
terest among their four children. I suspect 
they also took an inordinate pride in 
hearing their progeny spout pieces in the 
new tongue at church and school pro- 
grams. At least,. 5ye were always doing it." 

W hich may account for one son becom- 
ing a professor of English literature, and 
the other becoming an actor. 

"I was born on December 17, 1913," 
Herb says and, having dispensed with the 
one important fact, gives way to a rush 
of memories. "I recall sitting in my high 
chair at the kitchen table one day, at- 
tempting to pucker up a whistle in imi- 
tation of my older brother. All of a 
sudden, I emitted a beautifully clear, bird- 
like note — my first real triumph. ... As a 
grade-school thespian, my outstanding 
success was as Washington telling the 
truth about the cherry tree incident. Or, 
as Lincoln scratching his lessons on a 
wooden shovel, I was great. As any one of 
the three Kings of the Orient, unbeliev- 
able! ... I sang in the choir of the Trinity 
Lutheran Church. I also took ten lessons 
on the piano before the teacher and my 
parents gave up, but I had "The Off-to- 
the-Circus March" in pretty good shape. 
... I had a paper route for the St. Paul 
Daily News in Stillwater when I was ten. 
And the snow was really deep, too. . . . 
Oh, and I think I got as far as first-class 
Scout — I can't be sure." 



At sixteen, after graduating from high 
school: "I loafed for a month or two, 
then went to work as an usher at the 
Riviera Theater in St. Paul. I can re- 
member making a bet with the doorman, 
who wanted to be a fighter — possibly be- 
cause his name was John L. Sullivan — 
that I'd have my name on a Broadway 
marquee before he won a title." 

In 1930, Herb acted in a production of 
"Michael and Mary" put on by the Little 
Theater in his home town. "The night of 
our only performance," he recalls, "a bat 
got loose. The dead man came to life to 
see what was going on and then expired 
again. And a wonderful time was had by 
all." Herb also enrolled in the University 
of Minnesota so he "could get into their 
little-theater group." These were De- 
pression days, however, and he only re- 
mained a year. . . . 

In addition to those early jobs as a 
newsboy and a theater usher. Herb has 
also been a caddy, tobacco-store clerk, 
house-to-house salesman, cab driver, bus 
driver, house painter, counter clerk at a 
Glacier Park hotel, lumberjack in the 
CCC, government livestock reporter, odd- 
jobs man, sergeant-major in the Army, 
radar repairman, rifle instructor, and 
manager of a theatrical company. 

"Once." he adds, "I was offered a job as 
a flagpole-sitter during that craze, but I 
turned it down, feeling that it was work 
suitable only for a recluse — which I am 
not." 

Most of his life, however. Herb has been 
able to make a living at the business he 
likes best. It was only those first six years 
that were "mighty lean, and mostly a 
sideline to regular work." In 1930, he 
auditioned for a staf? job at Station 
WCCO, Minneapolis. 

"I floundered through a tremendously 
erudite book-review and wound up last," 
he recalls. "A similar audition at KSTP, 
St. Paul, several years and some experi- 
ence later, resulted in the suggestion that 
I consider some other line of work, be- 
cause there was a quality in my voice that 
would cause cheaper sets to vibrate. In 
1932, I joined a tent repertory outfit play- 
ing 'Toby shows' out of Fort Dodge, Iowa. 
I was handed a bundle of 'sides' that 
would have choked a horse, and also in- 
formed that I would have to do a specialty 
in the between acts 'oleo.' I came up 
with an uncertain rendition of 'St. James 
Infirmary Blues,' with gestures and tramp 
costume, which stunned both audience 
and producer. I stayed three weeks, got 
homesick and quit." 

By 1934, Herb was in St. Paul and 
Minneapolis, broadcasting livestock re- 
ports, as well as appesiring in local dra- 
matic shows. Three years later, he felt 
he was ready to try his luck in Chicago. 
At Station WGN, a radio producer needed 
an Englishman for a part in a daytime 
serial. Herb sat through four showings 
of a David Niven movie, then auditioned 
— literally "playing it by ear." He not 
only got the part but played it for two 
years. 

"The producer subsequently used me for 
all of his English parts on other shows, 
and was mighty surprised some time later 
when he found out I was from the Mid- 
west, not Middlesex." 

For the next three years. Herb acted in 
some twenty daytime serials, then shifted 
to New York, where he hoped to "have a 
go at the legitimate theater on Broadway." 
One year later, he was the juvenile lead 
in S. J. Perelman's "The Night Before 
Christmas." The following year, he was 
in Arnold Sundgaard's "The First Crocus." 
Meanwhile, he continued on radio, play- 



FROM HEAD TO TOE... 

Your skin . . .satin-smooth, gloriously 
fragrant - soothed, cooled, pampered 
by DJER-KISS — finest of 
imported talcs. Djer-Kiss Talcum 

helps prevent chafing, absorbs 
perspiration . ..keeps you exquisitely 
feminine all day long I 



29*. 434. 594 (plus tax) 




lou re thrilling tonile 

...when you wear Blue Waltz 
This heart-stirring perfume 

makes dreams come true! 
Try it—when you're 
ready for love! 





T 
V 
P 

85 




m 



THIS GORGEOUS BOOK rs REALLY . . . 

HOLLYWOOD 
IN REVIEW 



It's better than ever I It contains more news and pictures 
about all the stars of Hollywood than ever before. Yes, the 
exciting, new 1955 edition of PHOTOPLAY ANNUAL Is 
sensational. It's a treasure-mine of information about the 
stars ... a real Who's Who in Hollywood. This colorful 
and glamorous year book is THE book-of-the-year — as far 
as Hollywood is concerned. Get your copy of this prize 
book before they are all snatched up. Here is what you get 
in this great yearbook: 

NEWS EVENTS OF THE YEAR— 20 exciting pages Id 
pictures and text covering the month-by-month weddings — 
separations — divorces — births — awards — scoops. 

PERSONALITIES OF THE YEAR— Stories and picturei 
of Kobert Wagner • Janet Leigh, Tony Curtis • Debbie 
Reynolds • Bock Hudson • Marilyn Monroe • Guy Madi- 
son • Audrey Hepburn • Audie Murphy. 

LOVE SCENES— Beautiful full-page scenes of the start 
from ten top shows of the year. 

DANCERS OF THE YEAR— Action pictures and bio- 
graphical sketches of Cyd Charisse • Tera-Ellen • The 
Champions • Talna Elg • Leslie Caron • Mitzi Gaynor. 

PERFORMERS OF THE YEAR— Here you get portraits 
as well as action shots from their big pictures, plus the 
autographs of Marlon Brando • June Allyson • Van Johnson 

• Judy Garland • Robert Mitchum • Gary Cooper • 
Burt Lancaster • Ava Gardner. 

ALL-TIME FAVORITES— Beautiful pictures, plus thumb- 
nail sketches of Alan Ladd • Susan Hayward • Dean 
Martin • Jerry Lewis • Jeanne Crain • William Holden 

• Eleanor Parker • Clark Gable • Betty Grable • Victor 
Mature • Virginia Mayo • Kobert Taylor • Barbara 
Stanwyck • Richard Widmark • John Wayne. 



-Doris Day • Howard Keel 
I Danny Kaye • Rosemary 



SONGSTERS OF THE YEAR- 

• Jane Powell • Bing Crosby < 
Clooney • Frank Sinatra. 

PORTRAIT GALLERY— Pull-page pictures of Esther 
Williams • Elizabeth Taylor • Montgomery CUft • Jeff 
Chandler • Stewart Granger and Jean Simmons • Ann 
Blyth • Charlton Heston • Piper Laurie • Scott Brady • 
Jane Russell • John Derek. 

ASCENDING STARS — These are the names that are 
makinji news. Some have just flashed into siglit — some now 
shine with an extra radiance — Terry Moore • George 
Nader • Edmund ruidom • Jack Lemmon • Richard Hur- 
ton • Barbara Rush • Susan Cabot • 3efl Richards • 
Steve Forrest • Dee Avedon • Audrey Dahnn • Race 
Gentry • Russ Taiiiblyn • Sarita RIontiel • Elaine Stew- 
art • Jeffrey Hunter • Elroy Ilirsch • Rhonda Fleming • 
Pat Crowley • Ben Cooper • Lori Nelson • Robert Stack • 
Julia Adams • Suzan Ball • Maria English. 

ONLY 50<— WHILE THEY LAST 

This sensational Yca-tjook sells out practically as soon as 
it is put on sale. Don't be disappointed this ye-ir — only 
50c at newsstands or mail coupon with 50c — TODAY. 



PHOTOPLAY 
205 E. 42 St.. 



Dept. 
New York 17, N. Y. 



RM-755 
205 E. 42 St.. New York 17, N. Y. 

I Send me postpaid a copy of PHOTOPLAY 
I ANNUAL 1955. I enclose 50c. 

I 



T 
V 
R 

86 



I 
I 
I 
I 

I Name 

• PIcaso Print I 

I Address I 

I 

I City Staie I 

L 1 



ing in everything from Stella Dallas to 
Just Plain Bill, Portia Faces Life to John's 
Other Wife, The Prudential Hour to Lin- 
coln Highway. It was during this period 
that he acted his most difficult radio role — 
that of a ghost. 

"At one point," Herb remembers, "the 
director instructed me to achieve the effect 
of a green fog rising slowly up from a 
swamp. So I did it." 

Drafted into the Signal Corps in 1942, 
Herb was made a sergeant-major in 
charge of a hundred -man administrative 
staff, and was stationed in England, France 
and Germany. At the end of the war, he 
toured the ETO in a Soldier Show Com- 
pany production of "Golden Boy." Dis- 
charged in 1946, he joined the Barter 
Theater in Virginia, touring for the next 
three years in twenty-eight states through 
the South and Midwest. He played every- 
thing from Patsy in "Three Men on a 
Horse" to Prospero in "The Tempest." 

Returning to New York, he continued 
his career in radio and broke into TV. 
In addition to his regular role as Max Can- 
field in The Brighter Day, Herb now acts 
in all the top dramatic shows. Each sum- 
mer, in between TV engagements, he 
manages to do some summer stock as well 
as a smattering of film work. And re- 
cently, he appeared in two Broadway 
plays: "His and Hers," with Celeste Holm, 
and "The Seven Year Itch." 

That Herb has done so well in so highly 



competitive a profession is a tribute to his 
acting ability rather than his ambition. 
He has none, except "to live to be a hun- 
dred and to die happy. 

"I am not a subscriber to the success 
theory," he says. "I think it gets in the 
way of enjoyment of life." Enjoying life, 
he has never been unhappy enough to 
want to "give his all" for the theater. But, 
although he lacked the drive, he did have 
the direction. For a man, part of the 
enjoyment of life is enjoying the work he 
does, so that Herb's goal has always been 
in the theater. And, just as he has guided 
his life by instinct — "playing it by ear" — 
so with his career. 

"Whenever I come to some crossroad," 
Herb says, "when I have a decision to 
make about which direction to take, 
there's a monitor in me which acts as a 
direction-finder. 'Hey, Bub!' it warns — 
any time I'm about to get off the main 
track or lose sight of my goal." 

And today, Herb has reached his goal. 
-He has found success . . . not the kind 
that ends in a penthouse on Park Avenue, 
New York, but in a nine-room house on 
Park Avenue, Leonia, New Jersey . . . 
with a wife and three children, and his 
own workshop in the basement — so he can 
do a bit of carpentry once in a while, like 
his father before him. By playing one's 
life by ear, Herb has found, one often gets 
a melody that's new and fresh and all 
one's own. 



Live Up to Your Dreams 



(Continued from page 36) 
why. Vainly, Mama DeSimone reminded 
him that the lessons had been his own 
idea and that the family was making sac- 
rifices to pay for them. Johnny simply 
balked. 

His vivid recollection of the stress of 
that moment could still put emotion into 
his voice as he explained, "The trouble 
was, I had been faking. I had a terrific 
ear and I was quick to mimic what anyone 
did. I'd watch while the teacher played a 
piece through. Then I would imitate her. 
But I had not learned to read a single note 
of music. She was bound to discover it. 
I knew I had outsmarted myself." 

Her patience exhausted, Mrs. DeSimone 
had issued a direct order: "Go take your 
lesson." Johnny gave a flat refusal. "I 
won't." 

Ruefully, he recalls, "My mother locked 
the door. She snatched off her slipper. And 
she took after me. For more than a hour, 
we went 'round and 'round. When that 
spanking was over, I don't know who was 
crying the worse, my mother or me. But I 
do know that is when I realized that every- 
one has to answer for something and I 
had better start doing it." 

It was a thoughtful little boy who was 
ready to obey when his mother unlocked 
the door. "She called my older brother, 
Harry," said Johnny, "and told him to take 
me to the teacher, to see to it I confessed, 
and also to see that I took my lesson." 

In the recounting of it, Johnny paused 
long enough to clear something suspicious- 
ly like a lump from his throat. "My whole 
attitude changed after that. I buckled 
down. My father helped me get a paper 
route and I used the money to pay for 
more music lessons. Eventually, I went to 
the Detroit Conservatory. I also studied 
dancing and acting. Once I had admitted 
I had to work for what I wanted, I really 
went after it." 

The episode had an unexpectedly senti- 
mental little sequel. Smiling, Johnny re- 
called, "My mother never threw away 
that slipper. She still keeps it wrapped in 
tissue paper." 

It also had the practical effect of start- 



ing Johnny's professional career early. At 
eleven, he began singing on a children's 
program. He had acting parts on both 
The Lone Ranger and The Green Hornet. 
He danced in night clubs and he sang with 
a vocal group called The Downbeats. 

Bob Crosby renamed them The Bob-0- 
Links when he took them out on the road 
with his band. In Kansas City, a new girl 
singer, Ruth Keddington, joined up. A 
year later, Johnny married her. 

He sang alone, he sang with Gene 
Krupa's band and, when war came, he en- 
listed in the Air Force and sang with 
Major Glenn Miller's outfit. As a soldier 
soloist, Johnny Desmond was a well- 
heard hit. Tagged "The GI Sinatra," he 
found top bookings waiting for him when 
he got home. 

"I was just about the hottest thing along 
Broadway," Johnny recalled. "I headlined 
in a theater, I had two national radio 
shows. And, the day that Petrillo lifted the 
ban on live music on TV, I started doing 
CBS's first musical program." 

Here was overnight success of propor- 
tions to satisfy the most flamboyant day- 
dream. The Desmond star was shooting 
through the show business horizon. Then, 
still like a shooting star, it burned out 
fast. The TV show went first. "The trouble 
was," says Johnny, "we wanted to charge 
for it. It cost $675 a day for a five-station 
network. No sponsor had that kind of 
money for TV in those days. A fellow 
named Perry Como has my time now." 

Everything seemed to cancel out at once. 
"I just plain wasn't ready," Johnny ex- 
plains. "I couldn't handle it. My income 
dropped from $3600 a month to zero. For 
four months, we lived on our savings, 
without a dime coming in. Once you've had 
star billing, you can't go back. No one 
wants you. You've had it." 

In the pleasant house they had bought 
out on Long Island, things were beginning 
to get tight. Ruth, with Diane a toddler 
and Patti on the way, had a strained look 
around her eyes every time she had to 
make another subtraction from the di- 
minishing bank balance. 

A solution for Johnny's dilemma came 



when Don McNeill invited him to fill in 
for vacationing Jack Owens on The Break- 
iast Club. Shortly thereafter, when Owens 
moved to California, Don offered Johnny 
the permanent spot. 

"I sure hated to go to Chicago," Johnny 
now admits. ''I sulked during my w^hole 
first year. I'd stand back on the edge of 
the stage and think to myself, 'What corn!' 
I can tell you fast what the audience 
thought of me. After he had been gone a 
year. Jack Owens was still getting more 
mail than I was. I could have dropped dead 
and no one would have noticed. I kept ex- 
pecting McNeill to throw me back to the 
lions." 

Instead, Don led Johnny back to his own 
sound old system. "Let's go to work on 
this," he suggested. 

"Well," says Johnny, "we'd try one thing 
and Don would decide it wasn't quite 
right for me, so we'd try another. The 
other cast members helped me out. I 
worked at home, too, with Ruth coaching 
me. Bit by bit, I got interested myself. 
I came off the sidelines and began to par- 
ticipate." 

Johnny credits The Breakfast Club au- 
dience with putting on the final touches. 
"There's nothing like that day-to-day 
contact to let you know where you stand. 
The audience is part of the family and 
they expect you to be, too. I quickly found 
out what people liked or didn't like. When 
I began to relax and have fun, it showed 
in the mail." 

With returning confidence, Johnny again 
reached out toward the teenagers. He sang 
the "prpm" circuit, he cut some records, he 
ran a local high-school TV show. The 
Johnny Desmond fan clubs multiplied. 

As he looked forward to swinging out 
as a single again, the mature knowledge 
he had gained shaped his plans. He paid 
attention to the way songs are plugged 
and he took the trouble to learn how rec- 
ords are distributed. He found a new 
manager, Dick Gabbe, who understood his 
needs. 

But, most of all, he began thinking about 
the teenagers and the influence music and 
recording stars could have on them. "Ruth 
and I would talk it over," says Johnny, 
"and we would both have a feeling we 
were sort of standing in the middle. We 
could well remember how we used to get 
all gassed up about a recording star and, 
for a while, think he was absolutely the 
greatest — that his music was the only thing 
to express how we felt. And don't get me 
wrong. That can stiU happen to both of us. 

"But now we saw the other side, too. 
We'd notice a headline which coupled jazz 
with juvenile delinquency, and we'd think 
about our own little girls growing up. 
We'd hope that they would always get a 
real charge out of music, but also that 
they would hold a sovmd balance." 



Out of such husband-wife conversations 
came a plan, based on a do-unto- others 
principle. To put it into effect, Johnny, 
with the backing of his sponsor, the Philco 
Corporation, began organizing what they 
call "Phonorama" clubs. 

A fan club, Johnny believes, should do 
more than feed a star's ego. The way he 
looks at it, a fan club shoiild, first of all, 
give its members an opportunity to have 
fun listening to music together. It should 
also encourage them to develop their own 
abilities and talents. 

"What every kid wants more than any- 
thing else," Johnny says, "is recognition. 
That's the way it ought to be, for the 
most important part of growing up is 
learning to use your imagination, talents 
and abilities. Yet, too often, it is easier 
for a kid to get noticed for doing some- 
thing violent than it is for him to find an 
opportunity to do something worthwhile. 
Well, we're looking beyond those juvenile 
delinquency headlines on the front pages 
to search out the small headlines on the 
back pages — the ones that tell when a kid 
has achieved something." 

For such young wirjiers, there's a week- 
ly interview on Phonorama Time, an 
award of the month, and, at the end of the 
year, a college scholarship, presented by 
Philco, for the grand champion. Says 
Johnny, with satisfaction, "There's that 
chance for a kid to stand in the spot- 
light." 

But, in the planning, Johnny has not 
overlooked the advice, based on his own 
hard-earned lessons, which he gave to the 
Philadelphia girl reporter. "If you want 
to be a successful singer — or anything 
else — work at it." 

He's suggesting to club members that 
they develop their civic muscles by par- 
ticipating in community drives. In his 
opinion, "Teenagers constitute a tremen- 
dous community resource. When they 
pitch in, they can put over anything, 
whether it is fund-raising or a clean-up 
campaign. They have the energy, the en- 
thusiasm, the ideas. You'd be surprised 
what they can dream up while sitting 
around hstening to a stack of records." 

He bets his own stack of platters — the 
new releases which the recording com- 
panies send out to disc jockeys — on a dif- 
ferent club each week. "I'm sending them 
along for the kids to enjoy and I expect, 
in turn, to hear about their achievements," 
he said. 

For Johnny, too, the achievements again 
are impressive. As this is written, there's 
talk of a role in a movie. Then, on August 
15, he goes into rehearsal for a Broad- 
way show by George Axelrod and Jule 
Stern, titled "Tinsel Time." Johnny Des- 
mond, taking his own advice, is finding 
that his personal formula for success — 
"Work at it" — is working just swell. 



For COOL summer reading, be sure to get 

August TV RADIO MIRROR 

featuring: 

The red-hot McGUIRE SISTERS . . . 
The delightful Halls of Ivy College, RONALD and BENITA COLMAN 
The sensational GARY CROSBY . . . 
Set your copy early ... on sale everywhere July 5 




MARY ELLEN KAY 

In The Long Wait 

With ANTHONY QUINN 

Warner Bros. Release 



LIPS 



exciting! LI TO enticing! 

LIQUID LIPTONE can't smear! can't melt! 

Instantly make your Eps more thrilling; 
see them decked in romance-hued vibrant 
color that really can't smear. Obviously 
such a miracle could not be done by a 
cream lipstick, and it isn't. A liquid 
does it. Liptone contains no grease, no 
cream, no paste. Just pure liquid color. 

Now you can make up 
your lips before you 
go out — and no matter 
what you do — or whether 
it be in sunlight or 
moonlight — they'll stay 
divinely red till long 
after you're back home. 

Makes the Sweetest Kiss 
Because It Leaves no Mark on himi 

Think of it! Not a tiny bit of your glam- 
orous Liptone leaves your lips for his — or 
for a napkin or tea-cup. It stays true to 
your lips alone. Feels soft and smooth ... 
and is so easy to apply. All stores $1. 

Please try SEVERAL SHADES at my invitation 

You can't possibly know how loyely your lips will be 
till you see them in Liquid Liptone. Check coupon. 
Enclose 25c for each 
shade. Mail it at once. 
I'll send trial sizes of 
all shades you order; 
each lasts at least 2 
weeks. Expect to he 
thrilled. You WILL be! 






fSEND COUPON for generous Trial Sizes, 
PRINCESS PAT, Dept. 5147 
2709 S. Weils St., Chicoso 16, III. 
Send Triai Sizes of the shades I checked belowt 
t enclose 25c coin for each one. 



D English Tint orangey 

D Cyclamen bluish pink 

Q Gay Plom deep purple 

D Gypsy vibrant red 

n Jev^el bright ruby 

D Medium rich red 

D Clear — colorless. To sroearproof cream lipstick, 

ftrst blot lips, then hrvsh on Clear, 
Miss 
Mrs. -^ ■ 

Address 



n Orchid violet pink 
O Portsian sharp red 
D Regaf deep, soft red 
D Scarlet flame red 
D Tropic sunny red 
D Stren darkest red 



I City- 



-Zone 



-State 



T 
V 
R 

87 



T 
V 
R 

88 



No other way i 

cools tired • 
burning feet; 

faster,better than Ice-Mint i 



When feet feel like a 
furnace, and it hurts to 
walk, just rub on cooHng 
medicated Ice-Mint 
vanishing cream. Discover 
how fast those burning, 
fiery aches and pains can 
be reUeved. Greaseless, 
stainless! Contains 
amazing, soothing ^ • 
lanolin. Also 
marvelous for 
sunburn and 
windburn! Ask 
your druggist 
for wonderful 
Ice-Mint 
today! 





^/?££/™« 325 PICTURES 



With your order of TV and Movie 
Stars. One beautiful Scene from a 
latest production FREE. It's NEW 
•and has never been offered before! 

12/or 15^ - 28/or 25^ -64/01' 50< 

LUCKY STARS D«pf. T-3 
G. P. O. Box 738, NEW YORK 1, N. Y. 



i^f 



If you need more money... 

Up to $5 hour demonstrating 
Famous Hollywood Cos- 
metics, your neighborhood. 
Free Samples and details 
Si o«^iJIS'5\Supplied. Write to: 

*^' Guaranteed by ^ 

Good Housekeeping; „^„j^^^j j„^^^„^^ 

hfcJdJ^vmisio^iiJ^lendale, Calif., DepL TS-75 



So This Is Hollywood 




kAfk^$e 



MAKE $50-$60 A WEEK 

Practical nurses are needed In every 
community . . . doctors rely on them . . . 
patients appreciate their cheerful, ex- 
pert care. You can learn practical 
nursing at home in spare time. Course 
endorsed by physicians. 56th yr. Earn 
while learning. High School not re- 
Qulied. Men, women, 18 to 60. Trial plan. Write nowl 
CHICAGO SCHOOL OF NURSING 
Dept. 27, 25 East Jackson Blvd., Chicago 4, III. 
Please send free booklet and 16 sample lesson pages. 

yiame 

Citv State 4(7e 



'"'"."R'a''M'P50RIASIS 

I (SCALY SKIN TROUBLEI 



spore 

TEST.! 



^DeRmoiL 



SEE FOR YOURSELF 
no matter how long you 
have suffered. Write for 
1 FREE book on Psoriasis 
1 and DERMOIL wltli 
1 actual "before — after" 
\ photo record ol results. 



vgenerous 
Atrial 



Don't be embarrassed 
with Psoriasis, the usiy, 
scaly skin disease. Try 
non - staining DERMOIL. 

Amazing results reported 

lor over 22 yearsl Many 

grateful users report the ' 

scaly red patches on body _ 

or scalp gradually disappeared and they 

again enjoyed the thrill of a smooth clear etin. DERMOIL 

formula Is u?cd by many doctors. Must give deflnlte 

benefit or your money back. Make our famous "One Spot 

Test"! SICND lOP for trial bottle. DliRMOIL sold at 

Liggett and Walgreen and other leading Drug Stores. 

Write today LAKE LABORATORIES Dept. 9904 

Box 392S Stralhmoar Station, Detroit 27, Mich. 



{ContvaueA, from 'page. 59) 
show's ingenue. He remembered me, he 
said, as "that fresh kid from the movies." 
I went looking for the director to com- 
plain about this young man's remark — 
only to find that the young man, Joe Pev- 
ney, was the director. 

Of all the stock companies to choose 
from, I wondered how I managed to end 
up in Ivoryton! Then I remembered my 
grandmother's words: "Everything hap- 
pens for the best!" She was right. Two 
weeks later, Joe and I were holding hands. 
And, three years later, we were married! 

Our wedding took place in 1942, on our 
lunch hour. At the time, Joe and I were 
rehearsing for a Broadway play. I came to 
rehearsal that morning all dressed up in 
white gloves and white hat. The gang had 
a "hunch" that something was going to 
happen — after all, we usually all showed 
up in slacks. 

When we broke for lunch, Joe and I 
raced to City Hall, to the chambers of Su- 
preme Court Judge Morris Eder. He was 
the father of my girl friend Shirley, and 
she guaranteed he'd give us fast service. 
But, when we came panting into his 
chambers, he said, "Wait . . . slow down . . . 
don't be in such a rush. I don't even know 
this boy. At least, I would like to taih to 
you before I marry you. . . ." 

"Believe me," I said, "it's all right. 
Please, Ao hurry — we have to be back at 
two o'clock!" 

We did get back by two o'clock. But 
there was no rehearsal — just rice and 
champagne for the newlyweds. Later, when 
the champagne was all gone, the director 
said, "That's enough for today." He was 
right. 

Joe and I started out by taxi for his 
folks' home in Brooklyn. On the way, we 
were stopped three times by air-raid black- 
out tests. It took us over three hours to 
get there. Since Joe was about to go into 
the service, that three-hour taxi ride was 
our honeymoon. 

In December, 1942, Joe went into the 
Army. A few months later, he had his first 
leave and we went to Florida for a reaX 
honeymoon. 

I'd been to Florida before, but Joe never 
had. I so much wanted him to have a good 
time. But, the day we arrived, I came down 
with what I thought was ptomaine poison- 
ing. Poor Joe was trotting me back and 
forth to the doctor's and fetching me pills. 
I called my mother, telling her, "I've eaten 
something bad. I feel sick and upset. I 
think it's history's worst case of ptomaine." 

"I don't think you're sick," she said. "I 
think you're pregnant!" 

Wouldn't you know everything would 
happen for the best? My mother was right 
— it wasn't ptomaine! 

Joel was born on January 8, 1944, while 
Joe was still in Camp Crowder. After the 
baby was born, Joe came through New 
York on his way overseas, staying for three 
weeks. Then, for eighteen months, he sent 
pictures to us by mail. Which meant that, 
when Joe finally came home, Joel recog- 
nized him immediately. For weeks, it was 
"Daddy, Daddy, Daddy," all day long. 

Joe came out to Hollywood for "Noc- 
turne," an RKO picture, in 1946. I finished 
"Billion Dollar Baby" on Broadway and 
joined him. We liked it and decided to stay. 
For a while, we lived with friends. But, 
when Jan, our second baby, was due, we 
bought a house in a hurry. 

I suppose you can't help having a cer- 
tain amount of jealousy in the family when 
the second child arrives. Our solution to 
this problem was to have two more real 
soon. Jeff was born on April 3, 1951. Jay 



was born December 12, 1953. Today Jan — 
the only girl — is the queen bee. 

It seemed that Joe (now a director at 
Universal-International) was always work- 
ing when I had the first three children. It 
was ridiculous, the way we spent our 
time when the babies came. Joe took me to 
the hospital in the middle of the night, 
waited and waited — and nothing ever hap- 
pened. Then, finally, he'd rush off to work 
—only to be called back to the hospital! 
By then, the baby had been born. 

What with Joe's being called from the 
set, missing his work and his sleep, my 
having the babies was harder on him than 
it was on me. In addition, he still was 
never there when the baby was actually 
born! So, before Jay arrived, I told Joe I 
was going to do it for him on Sunday. 

Saturday night, December 12, 1953, we 
were at a friend's house when I reminded 
him that Sunday was "his" day, kiddingly 
adding: "Maybe if I dance around a bit, 
I could help nature along." 

Sure enough, Sunday morning about ten 
A.M., I told him, "Joe, I think it's time 
to call the doctor." 

He said, "I don't believe it!" 

But we did go to the hospital, the baby 
was born, and Joe — with an amazed look 
on his face — stuttered: "You said you 
would do it, and you did it!" 

Joe understands my love of show busi- 
ness. He even thinks I have talent, and 
he doesn't want to see me waste it. So, 
whenever I get fidgety around the house, 
from want of work, he senses my mood. 
"You ought to go out and play a club date 
for a few weeks," he says. "I'll check the 
office tomorrow and see what I can find." 

But we're also great homebodies. We 
decorated our Valley home together — or 
almost. First we picked out the colors, and 
some of the furniture, but then it got too 
close to baby-time again, and we had to 
call in a decorator for the finishing touches. 

And we have a record collection we 
love to listen to, made up of the works of 
Crosby, Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, and the 
classics, too. New Year's Eve at the Pev- 
neys' is usually confined to a small family 
dress-up dinner. Then we play records. 

Of course, the show. So This Is Holly- 
wood, takes a good deal of time. But it 
isn't as demanding as some people think. 
I've just finished six days off when I was 
with the children all day long. On work 
days, the three older ones are in school, so 
I couldn't be with them, anyway. I see 
them all in the morning, in the evening, 
and on weekends. They do get plenty of 
love and affection — and that's what's im- 
portant. 

My brother and I travelled all over the 
country with our parents, who had an act 
called Keno and Green — everybody in the 
business loved them. When I was a child 
star at Paramount, Will Rogers once told 
me my mother and father were the most 
loved people in the business. My mother 
danced in the chorus of the Ziegfeld shows 
with Mr. Rogers, and later as a solo. When 
I think now oi the wonderful things he said 
about them, it makes me mighty proud. 

I was a regular mimic from the start — 
as most children are. I remember watch- 
ing George Whiting's and Sadie Burke's 
act one day. She told a story about a little 
girl named Mabel— and I ran to my mother 
saying: "I can do what Aunt Sadie can do!" 
(The other performers were all "aunt" or 
"uncle" to me.) 

"Oh, really," Mother said, "show me." So 
I told her Aunt Sadie's "Mabel" story. She 
was very surprised. "That's wonderful," 
she said. "Would you like to do it on the 
stage?" I didn't need two invitations. My 



dad went to Sadie, asking if I could use 
her material. She said, "Yes." I later told 
my dad I didn't want to do it with them— 
after all, it was Aunt Sadie's act and I 
wanted to be out there with her! 

After my first stage performance in Aunt 
Sadie's routine, I didn't go on again for a 
while. My mother was pretty wise, and 
very much down to earth. She never forced 
me into anything. If I didn't feel like go- 
ing on, I didn't have to. In fact, there were 
times when I got homesick for Long Island 
and Mother said, "Come on, Joe, let's take 
a trip home so Mitzi can see the kids . . ." 

But I was happy as a child traveling with 
my parents. Besides, there were other kids 
on the road, too — I wasn't lonesome for 
playmates. Today, people ask me if my 
children are going to be performers. I say, 
"That's up to them." Of course, things are 
different now from when I was growing up 
— I seldom take my children on the set 
with me. But, even so, I don't think that 
show children miss anything. I didn't. 

1 remember, after I learned Aunt Sadie's 
routine, I also picked up a skit from Moran 
and Mack, the "Two Black Crows." Pretty 
soon my reputation had reached the book- 
ing office — they wanted Mother and Dad 
and me out as a trio. When we auditioned 
for them, my dad forgot his lines and I 
cued him. It panicked the office. Needless 
to say, we were all on the road together. 

Later, I played the Orpheum Theater in 
Los Angeles. One Sunday, in the hope of 
spotting new talent, the "brass" from Para- 
mount studio came to watch the show. 
Elsie Janis saw me doing a Fannie Brice 
imitation — a bit she used to do — and 
thought I'd be great for a picture the 
studio intended making called "Para- 
mount on Parade." 

But it took them a year and a half to get 
around to making it — and I was broken- 
hearted. After all, I was growing! But I 
really should have known better, for it 
hadn't been too long before that my grand- 
mother had spoken those now famous 
words: "Everything happens for the best." 

And it did. Because I was free at the 
time — and lucky — I signed my first contract 
with Paramount. It happened this way: 
"The Marriage Playground," another pic- 
ture, was being cast. With a change of 
clothes over her arm, my mother took me 
into the casting office to test. My heart 
sank. There must have been nine million 
children waiting and there I sat, a very 
plain Jane with bangs and a tailored dress. 
But, when the director finally saw me, he 
said, "That's the little girl!" No test, no 
nothing, just a contract. 

I became part of the Paramount studio's 
"stock company," meeting people like Will 
Rogers, Carole Lombard, Jack Oakie, Gary 
Cooper, Eugene Pallette, Clara Bow. To 
them, I was sort of a mascot. Wherever I 
went on the lot, I met people who knew 
my mother and father. Everybody loved 
them. Those days at Paramount are still 
bright in my memory. 

I went to school on the lot, too. Our 
teacher, Rachel Smith, made schooling a 
pleasure — everything I know, I owe to her. 
When there was a big picture-shooting, our 
classroom was filled. At one time or an- 
other, I went to class with Ida Lupino — 
fresh over from England — Jackie Coogan, 
Jackie Cooper, Junior Durkin and Jackie 
Searle. But, generally, there were just two 
in the class — Jackie Searle and me. 

"Tom Sawyer" was made while I was at 
Paramount, and playing Becky Thatcher 
was one of the highlights of my career. 
They gave me a wig with long blonde curls 
that made me look, I thought, just the way 
I had always wanted to look! Oh, I was so 
glamorous — and all of ten years old. 

So, again, I can say everything happens 
for the best. If it hadn't been for the delay 



in starting "Paramount on Parade," I 
might never have been signed for my first 
picture, "The Marriage Playground." 

"Everything happened for the best," on 
So This Is Hollywood, too. I was in one of 
my "go-to-work" moods and had been pre- 
paring another act for the Latin Quarter in 
Florida. It was the Tuesday before last 
Thanksgiving, and Joe was in San Diego, 
scouting locations for a new picture, when 
I got a call from his studio telling me that 
agent Lester Linsk wanted to know who 
my agent was — he had something he 
wanted me to see. 

I called my agent to find out what was 
up. "A TV show is cooking," he said. 
"You'll be perfect for the part. Would you 
like to look at the script?" 

"Okay," I said. A copy of So This Is 
Hollywood came over immediately. Sure, 
it was a cute idea, a cute script, I liked it 
very much — and I told the agent so. 

"■That's fine," he said. "Glad you'll do it. 
It starts shooting Friday!" 

"Wait a minute!" I said. "I haven't said 
I'd do it. I've got to talk to my husband. 
What do I know about television?" 

So I made him wait until I talked to Joe. 
I finally reached him by phone on a launch 
sorriewhere in the San Diego harbor. I was 
worried about signing the TV contracts 
and the short time — and it was a new 
medium and, naturally, I was a little bit 
afraid. Joe said, real matter-of-fact, "Oh, 
if you like the script, go ahead and do it." 

But every new venture makes me nerv- 
ous, and on Wednesday morning I still 
hadn't made up my mind. 

Then Wednesday night the producer, Ed 
Beloin, called. "Listen, Mitzi, we'd love 
to have you and I know you'll be happy 
over here . . ." 

"Yes," I said, "but I still don't know . . ." 

"Look, don't worry about a thing. By the 
way, what size are you?" 

"I'm a ten: but what has that to do . . ." 

"That's fine — " I still hadn't said "yes," 
but he continued — "and I would like you 
down here for a fitting. I'm so glad you're 
going to do it!" 

"But . . ." 

"Tomorrow morning, I want you to see 
our production man. We'll probably run 
through scene two and three . . ." 

"But . . ." 

"And you'll want to have your hair fixed. 
I'll set an appointment with Florence 
Erickson. You'll love Florence, the great- 
est hair stylist in the business . . ." 

I got in one last "But . . ." before he 
hung up. The next day, instead of cook- 
ing a turkey — as most Thanksgiving house- 
wives were doing — at 9 A.M., I was sitting 
in the studio chair having my hair done. 
We rushed through things so fast that, 
Friday morning, I was being hit on the 
head with a breakaway bottle — by a man 
I'd never even been introduced to! 

Since then, of course, I've fallen out of 
buildings, into rivers, been hit on the head 
with every movable piece of furniture on 
the set — and, at first, I lay awake nights 
wondering if I'd come out of the next day 
alive or not! 

Last week I was daydreaming off into 
space, thinking, "What will we have for 
dinner? Duck? Pot roast?" — just as they 
were about to throw me into a pool. 
Seeing my smile, the director said, "Well, 
Mitzi, seems you're beginning to like it!" 

"I am getting used to it," I said. 

Actually, television is a lot of fun. In 
fact, it's proved to me once again how 
true my grandmother's words were: 
Everything happens for the hest. It does. 
Look, for example, how I got into motion 
pictures; how, at first meeting, I didn't 
like my future husband; and how, in the 
begiiming, I fought television — now I 
wouldn't give it up for the world! 




can be yours 
for helping us 
take orders for 



EXTRA CASH 

magazine subscriptions. Write for FREE informa- 
tion. There is no obligation. 

Macfadden Publications, 205 E. 42 St., N.Y. 1 7, N.Y. 



OO FOR A LITTLE 
SPARE TIME 

With NEW Christmas Card Line! 



I 



New Tall Cards I 

( 25jorJ^- 
,30-CirdlBoxj 

5GIFT WRAPS, 



Make Toe profit on each SI .25 TALL- Jf Only Cardinal 
CARD "Imperial Gold" Christmas 51 Oflers You 
Assortment — $60. OO cash on 80 
boxes easily. 2oO fastest selling card 
assortments, stationery, gift items — 
many EXCLUSIVES incladiiig Per- 
sonalized Christmas Cards. Famous 
Doehlaline color catalog. ExtraCash 
Bonus; Guarantee assures up to 15c 
more profit per box. l-Free-With-3 
Sample Offer; other surprise Free Of- 
fers. Send coupon for ^. , , 

sample kit NOW. /^jS"' "-^""^^^Jsl BY-THE-YARD 
$1.95 GIFT /9 Guaianteed by ^uiur iuddiutc 
Prompt Action. V^ ^J^^ 40 for f-^ „p 
CARDINAL CRAFTSMEN 

1400 STATE AVE., DEPT. 29-R, CINCINNATI 14, OHIO 

Seod money-making kit of BaBsortments on approval. FREE 
Personalized Samples, other FREE Offers. 

Name 

Address 



- I 



City State-. 



T 
V 
R 

89 



T 
V 
R 

90 



Corns 



Sore Toes, 
Tender 
Spots 




N£RVE-'i 



Pain Stops 
FAST! 



No waiting! Super- 
Soft Dr. Scholl's Zino-pads stop pain at its 
source ever so fast . . . remove corns one of 
the fastest ways known to medical science . . . 
stop corns before they can develop . . . ease 
new or tight 3hoes . . . pre- 
vent sore toes, blisters. No 
other method does all this ! 
For FREE sample, write Dr. 
Scholl's, Inc., Chicago 10, 111. 





BUNIONS 

DOCTOR'S FAST RELIEF! 

To instantly lift painful shoe 

friction and hide the unsightly 

bulge, wear Dr. SchoU's BUNION REDUCER— a 
cushioning shield of soft rubber. Worn invisibly 
under stocking. Helps preserve shape of shoe. Only 
75^ each. At Drug, Shoe, Dept. Stores everywhere. 

MAKE BIG MONEY FAST! 

Send me your name and address today on a postcard. I will 
send you FREE information telling you how to make BIG 
MONET in your spare time by helping us take orders (or 
magazine subscriptions in your neighborhood. Send name 
and address to: Macfadden Publications. 205 East 42 St., 
New York 17, N. Y. There is no obligation! 



DANCING SHOES — SUPPLIES 

Toe $5.95, Pads & Ribbons ?1.00; Ballet 
S3. 29, Tap Shoes With Toe Taps. To Size 3, 
S4.95. Larger $5.45; Acrobatic $1.39, Crepe 
Sole $1.95. send Shoe Size and Foot Outline. 
Leotards $3.85. Sheer or Mesh Opera Hose 
$4.95, Mesh Tights $7.45. Hula Skirts $3.25. 
Send Check or Money Order, No C.O.D.'s Please. 

BATON — DRUM CORPS SUPPLIES 

SKATING SKIRTS—Roller or Ice 

Complete Catalog 15c (applied to purchase; 

QUINCON DANCE SUPPLIES 

7 FOSTER ST.. Dept. R, QUINCY 69. MASS. 




BIZARRE 




BOOK 
SERVICE 

Dept. 120 
40 E. 23rd St., N. Y. 10, N. Y. 
Specialists in rare and out-of-print 
esoteric curiosa. Collectors: write, in- 
dicate title, author or subjects desired. 
Be sure to send self-addressed 
stamped envelope for reply. 



AMAZE YOUR FRIENDS 

tie BOWS like this EH 

Create exciting gift wrappings. 
Follow instructions in this book.^ 

Send onJy^Qj for your copyj 
RIPPL-TIE Produtts Company 

2725 WEST ARMITAGE • CHICAGO 47. ILLINOIS 








NU-NAILS 

ARTIFICIAL FINGERNAILS 

Cover short, broken, thin nails 
with NU-NAILS. Applied in a jiffy 
with our amazing ticm; quick~dry~ 
ing glue. Can be worn any length 
. . . polished any shade. Help over- 
come nail-biting habit. Set of ten 
29c. At dime, drug& dept. stores. 
NU-NAILS CO., Dept. 1 6-H 

5251 W. Harrison, Chic:aeo44 
Also Hollywood Fingernails . . . 
Permanent Dubonett l4osc Color. 
No polish required ... 39c sef. 



A Family to Cherish 



(Continued from page 30) 
has always been: "Work — hard work — 
and do the best you can." So, with Mary's 
blessing, he accepted the role, went on to 
New York . . . and one of the most coveted 
honors in television. 

"If you want to understand Bob," says 
Mary Elliot Cummings, his wife of ten 
years and mother of their four children, 
"you have to go back to his early life in 
Joplin, Missouri. His father was a small- 
town doctor — a difficult life at any time, 
because of the little money he made, and 
he was too kind-hearted to keep much of 
even this meager income. The first years 
of the Depression only magnified their 
financial plight." 

Bob, early interested in aeronautical en- 
gineering, soloed when he was still in high 
school, became a flight instructor at six- 
teen and, two years after that, went to 
Carnegie Tech to study engineering. "The 
Depression stopped me cold in the middle 
of my last year," says Bob. "Until then, I 
had worked my way through school as a 
Colorado cowhand, commercial flight in- 
structor, a Sunday airplane bus pilot car- 
rying passengers at $5 a ride, a soda jerk — 
and, in school, as 'busboy' and carving 
man behind the steam table. We had beef 
dinners there on Thursdays. During the 
Depression, Thursdays were always my 
fattest days." 

The opposite sides of Bob's character 
were established early in his life. He left 
school to take a job as a student actor in 
the American Academy of Dramatic Arts 
— fully intending to save his money and 
return to engineering. The acting job was 
as diametrically opposed to his aptitude 
for engineering as any job could be. Says 
Bob: "My roommate, a would-be actor, 
found the job for me — it paid $14 a week. 
The Academy had 100 girls for every boy. 
In order to put on their plays, they had 
to pay men to come there to study." 

After the dramatic schooling ended. Bob 
tried his luck as a professional actor. 
"That was during the 1929-to-1935 ueriod," 
he says. "Unless you were British, you 
couldn't get cast in any of the Broadway 
shows. We had a regular wave of British 
plays on the American stage — 'Journey's 
End,' 'Berkeley Square' — everything was 
British. Except me. I was too American. 

"In utter desperation, I took $683 from 
a life-insurance policy and bought a 
round-trip steerage ticket on a slow boat 
to England. I stayed there twenty days — 
long enough to pick up an authentic British 
accent. I bought a British suit, had pic- 
tures taken in it, then wrote to New 
York producers, saying I was 'Blade 
Stanliope Conway, the youngest actor- 
author-manager-producer in England.' I 
added that I wasn't particularly interested 
in money, but only wished the experience 
of playing before Ajnerican audiences. In 
my letters, I gave the day of my arrival, 
a Park Avenue address (that of a friend) 
—and then left for New York." 

The ruse worked. Within a week, 
"Blade Stanhope Conway" was in re- 
hearsal for Galsworthy's play, "The Roof." 
His training in the American Academy of 
Dramatic Arts stood Bob in good stead — he 
opened to good notices. 

After five years of being a professional 
Englishman on Broadway, plus playing on 
radio as straight man to Milton Berle, 
Bob came to Hollywood on torn-. Here he 
decided to make a try at pictures. Unfor- 
tiuiately, he was caught in a trap of his 
own making — only Westerns and adven- 
ture yarns were being filmed, and Eng- 
lishmen were no longer in demand. 

So the man of opposites changed char- 



acters again. "Can you imagine?" says 
Bob. "When I tried out for 'Lives of a 
Bengal Lancer,' the casting director said 
I was too British! So I trooped off to Texas, 
stayed there long enough to garner a 
Southern accent, and then returned to 
Hollywood. 

"I told everyone I was from San Angelo, 
suh, a real rootin', tootin' Texan. In twen- 
ty-four hours, I had a role as a Texan in 
'So Red the Rose.' After that, Hollywood 
began making a series of English pictures. 
'Lloyds of London' was one. I read for it 
but naturally wasn't accepted — because I 
had just played the role of a Texan. "Tyrone 
Power got the part. And me with the 
perfect English accent! It took me two 
years to become my American self again." 

World War II came along. Bob entered 
the Army Air Force as a pilot instructor 

. . and, shortly before his discharge, he 
met Mary Elliot. "Photographer Paul 
Hesse," says Bob, "was always trying to 
pair me off. He. called me one day, say- 
ing, 'I've just shot pictures of a girl 
you have to meet. I'm having a party 
tonight — how about coming over?' So I 
did. But, when I got there, Mary had 
brought a date — about six-foot-six tall — 
and I think I said hello to her just once 
in the entire evening. Hesse asked me 
the next day what I thought of her. I said, 
'What I saw of her was fine.' 

"Six weeks later," Bob continues, "I flew 
a batch of performers to Muroc Air Base 
for a show. We were flying on instru- 
ments, trying to get up out of the moun- 
tains, and I couldn't understand why the 
plane wouldn't climb! I asked the co-pilot 
to look back aft. He returned, saying, 
'The whole gang has formed a dance line 
and are practicing their routines!' 

"Well, of course, that couldn't go on 
much longer or we would all be doing 
our routines — with wings. I had them 
pile forward and sit down. In the crush, 
one of the gals was shoved into our com- 
partment. I asked her to come in — the 
co-pilot gave up his seat — and we talked 
for a few minutes. But I didn't recognize 
her as Mary Elliot because I was too busy 
flying the plane, and she didn't recognize 
me because I had my earphones on. 

"After the show, the air base com- 
mander thanked the troop, then an- 
nounced, 'I think we ought to give a round 
of applause to the pilot who flew you up 
here tonight — who is also a motion pic- 
ture actor — Robert Cummings!' 

"Mary caught me outside afterwards 
and said, 'Hi! How are you? Remember 
me? I'm the girl at Paul Hesse's.' That's 
how we met — again. I called her when 
I came into Los Angeles on leave a week 
later. A month after that, I was dis- 
charged. And, a month after that, we 
were married!" 

Bob and Mary were married by Bob's 
mother, a minister, on March 3, 1945, in 
the Flyer's Chapel at the Mission Inn in 
Riverside, California. "I was doing a 
picture at Paramount," Bob adds. "We had 
the whole afternoon off for the wedding. 

"In those rent-restricted days," he 
says, "there wasn't a vacant house, a vacant 
apartment, or even a vacant room to rent. 
Believe it or not, in order to find a place 
to live, Mary and I had to buy an apart- 
ment house." 

Bob's and Mary's first child, Robert 
Richard, was born in 1946. The small 
family lived in the apartment for two 
years while planning the home they in- 
tended to build. 

The home which they built was care- 
fully planned from the lowest cement 
basement step to its highest shingle. The 



thought which went into this planning is 
a direct contrast to the scatterbrain think- 
ing with which Bob has so long been as- 
sociated on the motion picttire and TV 
screens. 

The house was built with childhood ills 
in mind, for the protection of the young- 
sters — and their parents, too. As Bob says, 
"You have to protect the goose that lays 
the golden egg." Though he doesn't like 
the analogy, he thinks it is rather apt: 
"It was Mary's idea and she is right. When 
an actor is ill, he's out of business. I just 
can't afford to be sick. So we had an 
"isolation ward' built — a special kitchen 
upstairs, special silver, special cups and 
saucers, everything for the kids' needs. 
And I haven't had a cold since we've 
lived here. 

"Of course," Bob adds, "we still suffer 
along with every childhood ailment. Re- 
cently, they came down with the measles. 
First, it was Robert, now nine. Then it 
was Mary Melinda, 7. And then, after a 
ten-day incubation period, Sharon Patricia, 
3 — bless her little heart — became our 
spotted daughter. Fortunately, the baby. 
Laurel Ann, then only one month old, 
has a built-in anti-measles machine — 
she was not supposed to get it, ac- 
cording to the doctor, even if exposed. 
But, believe me, we took no chances." 

As opposed to the comic character he 
plays. Bob leads a quiet, well-ordered 
life at home. But there is one aspect of 
the Bob Cummings Show which matches 
his real-life personality. It's his sense 
of responsibiltiy for others, which is 
touched on lightly in the script, through 
his relationship to his "sister." At home, 
with his wife and four children, Bob's re- 
sponsibilities are much greater. "When 
you have children," says Bob, "your at- 
tack on life automatically becomes more 
intense. As a parent, you grow to hate 
the slightest suggestion of immorality. I 
don't mean to say that you become a 
prude. But, when you hear people talk 
about teen-age delinquency and similar 
problems, you say to yourself 'That could 
happen to my boy — or my daughter!' 

"As a consequence, you try to protect 
them in every way you can. Even with 
the more mechanical things in Ufe, I try 
to teach them and to protect them from 
accidents. They all learned to swim — un- 
derwater, too — before they could walk. 
We have safety belts in our plane and in 
our car. And, as soon as they are old 
enough to hold a wheel, I teach them to 
drive." 

The complete thoroughness with which 
Bob is approaching this program of train- 
ing is again in direct contrast to the light- 
hearted comedy he plays. But thorough 
he is. "The little car," says Bob, "is a 
gasoline-powered Eshelman built in Balti- 
more by a man who had an ideal: He 
thought, 'If every child could learn to 
drive before he was ten years old, twenty 
years from now we would be able to 
eliminate all highway accidents.' By in- 
troducing 'children to power-driven autos 
at an early age, the edge is taken off the 
sudden excitement of having a car at 
sixteen — and the possibility of releasing 
another untutored, miiidering, roaring 
juggernaut on the highway is reduced 
to a minimxim. 

"All of the children, except the baby, 
can drive. They have no fear of the auto. 
In fact, they learn in about five minutes. 
When they can steer, I set up an obstacle 



course of aluminum chairs and we prac- 
tice figure-eights around them, much as 
the pilots did during the war. 

''Speaking of airplanes, everyone in the 
family is a 'flyer' — including the baby. We 
all take weekend trips in our seven-place 
Beechcraft. Mary's had five hundred 
hours in the air, and she's a good navi- 
gator. As with swimming and driving, the 
children fly as soon as they can get up in 
Mary's arms and are old enough to go out 
of the house for a weekend. We don't 
make a production out of it — we just do 
it, that's all. As a result, the kids accept 
air travel as if it had been going on since 
Pharaoh's time. As far as they're con- 
cerned, it's the thing to do. Robert, only 
nine, can land and take off as well as I 
do — if not better. And because he's been 
introduced to airplanes early in life, as 
with the car, he won't be a daredevil. He'll 
be more cautious and probably a better 
pilot than I ever will be — and I've been 
flying since 1927." 

In addition to his children. Bob is also 
interested in his fellow man. This is an- 
other facet of his serious side which the TV 
audience does not see. Bob is a crusader 
for safety belts in every American car; 
he hopes to educate the public through 
the distribution of physicist William 
Harper's book. Mangled Millions; and he 
has a very special little crusade to have 
all legal holidays fall on Monday. 

"I ordered a new safety belt for our 
car," says Bob. "It's one of the shoulder- 
harness type. Right now, there is a bill 
before Congress to make it a federal law 
that all automobiles engaged in interstate 
commerce must be equipped with safety 
belts, and the passengers must be wearing 
them. Life-insurance companies, I think, 
will soon offer lower premiums as an in- 
ducement to people to wear the harness- 
type belt. I know I would gamble twelve 
to fifteen dollars to cut my chances of 
being killed in an accident by six hundred 
per cent! I'm not interested in dying. I'd 
like to be 150 years old. 

"Physicist William Harper has written 
this forty-page booklet, Mangled Millions, 
to tell the public about the dangers of 
driving. We want to make it available to 
as many people as possible. I think that, 
if enough people read it, it will make it 
much more difficult for them to forget that 
100,000 die each year — and literally m.il- 
lions are mangled!" 

Bob's last crusade, putting all legal holi- 
days on Mondays, is a subject dear to his 
heart. "Take July Fourth for example," 
he says. "Why should we celebrate it 
precisely on the fourth? After all, the 
Declaration of Independence was signed 
on June 23. Think of what regular 
scheduled three-day holidays could do to 
our way of life: Our lives would be more 
orderly, resort business would be im- 
proved, the very m.ood of the people would 
be improved. It would help business and 
help the country." 

But it doesn't make any difference to 
Bob — the man of opposites, the man of 
many talents — whether he's working on his 
crusades or on being a family man, or 
on entertaining his millions of fans. What- 
ever it is, he's always working. "Work, 
hard work, that's the stuff for me," he says, 
with a happy grin. "I'll be satisfied as 
long as I can tell myself I've done the best 
I can with every job I've had." 

And the greatest job of all is loving 
and cherishing his family. 



invest in your future — buy 



U. S. SAVINGS BONDS 



join the payroll-saving plan 



New! Clearasil Medication 

STARVES 
PIMPLES 

SKIN-CuLURED. . . hides pimples while if works 




DOCTORS' TESTS PROVE 
9 out of 10 cases cleared up 
.or definifely improved 



Doctors' clinical tests prove this new-type medi- 
cation especially for pimples really works. In 
skin specialists' tests on 202 patients, 9 out of 
every 10 cases were cleared up or definitely im- 
proved while using clearasil. 
Amazing starving action, clearasil actu- 
ally starves pimples because it helps remove the 
oils that pimples "feed" on. And clearasil's 
antiseptic action stops the growth of bacteria 
that can cause and spread pimples. Skin-colored 
to hide pimples and end embarrassment. Grease- 
less, stainless . . . pleasant to leave on day and 
night for uninterrupted medication. 
America's largest-selling specific pimple 
medication... because clearasil has helped so 
many boys, girls and adults. GUARANTEED 
to work for you as it did in doctors' tests or 
money back. Only 59* and 98#. At all druggists- 
Get clearasil today. 



J)i! ru;us.«iAcx£ I Good Housekeeping 1 

Now also available in Canada (slightly more) 





"S^ouxkrSilM^ 

PERMANENT DARKENER* 

TOR LASHES AND BROWS 

SWIMPROOF! One application lasts 
4 to 5 weeks! Our 22ml year. 



$1.00 (plus tax) at leading drug, 
dept. and variety chain stores 



25^ 



SendTOD/»y 
for tRlAL size; 



5 "DARK-EVES" COMPANY, Depl. P.75 ' 

I 3319 V/. Carroll Ave., Chicago 24, III. | 

I I enclose 2S« (coin or slomps-lax included) for TRIAL SIZE | 

I PACKAGE of 'Dark-Eyes" with direclions. B 



check shade: Q Black Q Br 



I Addrei 

I I Town-. 



-■■ 



T 
V 
R 

91 



T 
V 
R 

92 



Callouses, Tenderness, Pain, 
Burning at Ball of Foot? 



Ball-o-foot 

Cushion 



LOOPS OVER TOE 

QUICK RELIEF 
BEYOND BELIEF! 

hAade of soft LATEX 
FOAM and NYLON 

You Actually WALK 
ON CUSHIONS! 



It's entirely NEW! Never before anything like it 
for relieving painful callouses, tenderness, burning 
at ball of foot! The cushion — not you — absorbs 
shock of each step. Dr. SchoU's BALL-O-FOOT 
Cushion loops over toe. No adhesive. Flesh color. 
Washable. Worn invisibly. $1.00 pair at Drug, 
Shoe, Dept., 5-10(J Stores and Dr. SchoU's Foot 
Comfort© Shops. If not obtainable locally, order 
direct, enclosing $1.00 and state if for woman or man 
DR. SCHOOL'S, INC., Dept. 57B, Chicagro 10, lU. 



OLD LEG TROUBLE 




i 



Easy to use Viscose Applications may 
heal many old leg sores due to venous 
congestion of varicose veins, leg swell- 
ing or injuries. Send today for a FREE 
BOOK and No-Cost-For-Trial-plan. 
R. G. VISCOSE COMPANY 

140 N. Dearborn Street, Chicago 2, Illinois 



MAKE BIG MONEY! 

Write today for FREE plan which shows you 
how to make big money in your spare time. 
All you do is help us take orders for maga- 
zine subscriptions. No experience needed. 
Send name and address today. There is no 
obligation. 

MACFADDEN PUBLICATIONS 
205 East 42 St., N. Y. 17, N. Y. 




ENLARGEMENT 

Plus 12 Keepsakes 



Glamorous black and white enlarge- 
ments 8x10 inch on double weight 
portrait paper and gold tooled leath- 
erette frames only 67c ea. FREE! If 
you order 3 enlargements you get 
one extra 8x10 free plus 12 small 
size keepsakes free. But you must 
hurry. To get the free gifts, rush 
favorite photos or films at once. Be 
sure to include color of hair, eyes, 
etc. for oil coloring information. 

Your originals safely returned. , , , , . . , , . , , 

Send no money. Pay postman plus C.O.D. State choice 
S .?i^^- ^™^? ?L™.Y.'i°"- *^^' photos today. Act now. 
DifL 729, Manil Art, lUO Rooscvdl R«ad, Chicaso 11, Illinois 



/aAi 



^T'«V^^ 






■ ■';■ ,■■> 




^TiiJwi^i*Sii| 



Yes. it's 
Dr. R.Schiffmann's 
ASTHMAOOR, favorite 
inhalant treatment for 
bronchial asthma victims everywhere. 
Ignite the powder, or smoke it in clearette 
or pipe mixture form and the soothing, 
medicated fumes bring blessed relief. At 
all drug stores in U.S. and Canada. 






'■n 






ASTHMADOR 






^0 

.■•.A'-.«-"!f<'*'i- ■'«■* 



The Long Way Home 



(Continued from page 68) 
boy who had never known anything else. 

At three, he was doing a song-and- 
dance routine with Field's Minstrels, and 
at fifteen he was a member of a showboat 
company on the Mississippi. His folks, 
however, did like a little town in Illinois, 
named Mattoon, enough to settle there for 
increasingly longer times between tours. 

It was during one of these "settled 
down" periods in Mattoon, when Tom was 
fourteen, that he went to a kids' party and 
met Bernice Wood, then an already pretty, 
maturing twelve. She was dressed in 
something blue, her skirt a good deal 
longer than her mother's (it was, after all, 
1926), and from the time he got to the 
party he couldn't keep his eyes off her. 
He was glad he'd worn his new two-toned 
shoes. He looked like a real sheik. 

By ten-thirty that evening, the party 
had progressed to the "post-office" stage 
and, when finally he got her in the closet 
in the dark, he planted a firm kiss on her 
lips and said, "You may not believe this, 
Bo, but I'm going to marry you when you 
get old enough!" 

1 here is no record of her reply. Possibly 
she giggled and said, "Write it on the ice," 
or "So's your Aunt Emma" — very hep re- 
plies in those days. Anyway, his technique 
worked, because he kissed her again on 
her front porch, and made a date with her 
for the following Saturday. 

It was almost seven years after that 
evening when, bringing Bo home from a 
movie to that same front porch, he sat on 
the top step beside her and said, "You're 
old enough now, Bo. How about it?" 

She knew what he meant, but she had to 
play hard to get, just a little. "Old enough 
for what?" 

"For me. Well, Bo?" 

"Why else," she said then, abandoning 
all pretense, "have I been sitting here 
waiting, these seven mortal years?" 

It wasn't quite as simple as that, of 
course. Bo had always been a homebody, 
a girl who wanted a stable family life, 
with a husband whose whereabouts she 
could be sure of, and a house she could 
keep and tend and make a home in, and 
children to care for. She was pretty sure, 
now, that Tom would stay put. He'd stayed 
in Mattoon long enough to finish high 
school, Marion Military Institute, De Pauw 
University, the University of Illinois, and 
twenty -two months at Annapolis. 

And, for a long time, it seemed that her 
security was real. Tom got a job in radio, 
first in Tuscola, Illinois, and later in Chi- 
cago, on a big-time network. The baby 
finally came along, at long last, about the 
time Tom began making more money. 

The little family was supremely content. 
As the years passed, Tom, Jr. grew tall 
and started showing signs of being a fine 
athlete. They bought and furnished a home 
in Northfield, and Tom worked at his job, 
and there was laughter at midnight and 
in the mornings when Tom and Bo were 
together. 

And then it happened. "I don't know 
quite how to explain it," Tom told me, 
ruefully. "It was one of those things that 
happen when you're in this business. Sud- 
denly there was all that success, and I had 
so many things on my mind and so much 
to do, that Bo and I just never seemed to 
be together any more. We'd always been 
so close, before. Now I was away most of 
the time, traveling around, and — even aft- 
er eighteen years of marriage — Bo and I 
began to see each other as strangers." 

That wasn't really true, of course. It was 
only that they had been so very close to 
one another, physically and emotionally, 



so sure of the warmth of their companion- 
ship and love and shared happiness — so 
terribly dependent on one another — that 
they saw their new situation as out of 
context with ordinary living. Most mar- 
ried couples, less interdependent, less 
deeply in love, could have accepted the 
changed circumstances in stride. 

It didn't work for Bo and Tom. He began 
to put his career, his incredible success, 
ahead of Bo's wishes and her requirements 
as a wife and mother. . . Bo, bewildered 
by a situation she had never before en- 
countered, was alternately patient and 
furious, until finally she didn't know 
what to be. . . . There were a few tor- 
mented months of wrangling and deep 
misery. Then, by mutual consent, they 
parted and Bo got her divorce. . . 

Tom Moore is not the kind of man who 
can live alone. Still bristling with pride 
and, perhaps, a sense of outrage, he be- 
gan to see more and more of Willie Lou, 
the girl from Georgia whom he had known 
and liked for some time. I don't think it's 
any discredit to Lou that Tom says, now, 
"She reminded me of Bo. She looked a lit- 
tle like her, and she was always laughing, 
just as Bo was — " 

It seems evident enough now that all 
Tom wanted was to go home, even then, 
but he was too proud and stubborn to ad- 
mit it. Instead, he married Lou, and for 
almost three years it seemed as if he had 
exchanged one degree of happiness for 
another, just as good. Lou did everything 
within her power to give him happiness. 
She learned to water-ski when she 
couldn't even swim, because Tom was fas- 
cinated with the sport. She went on camp- 
ing trips, accompanied Tom and Tom, Jr. 
on wild pig and turkey shoots. 

It may seem strange that it took them 
both more than three years to find out that 
it wasn't working for them. And it took 
additional months of misery and endless 
talk and tears before they knew that di- 
vorce was their only answer. 

It was then, only then, that Tom went 
to Bo in Northfield and said, "We made a 
mistake. How about it, darling?" 

When she didn't answer at once he said, 
"It's been over three years. What've you 
been doing all this time, Bo?" 

She smiled. "Waiting here," she said. 
"Waiting for you to come home. . . ." 

So, this summer, when Tom, Jr. finishes 
at Shattuck Military Academy in Minne- 
apolis, he will stand with his father and 
mother in a little Illinois church while the 
minister who married his mother and 
father twenty-three years ago again re- 
unites them in a marriage that was meant 
from the beginning to last forever. 

Then Tom and Bo will have to decide 
about their future. Tom's contract with 
Mutual will still be in effect; he will still 
be talking to millions of women through 
more than 500 station outlets across the 
country. And, besides, he's bought a radio 
station in Winter Haven, and is beginning 
to build houses on a contracting deal. 

That means they may not be able to 
spend as much time as they used to in the 
old Northfield house, but no matter. Bo 
has had time to do some thinking on her 
own, and she isn't so set against move- 
ment and change any more. 

Of course, Lou received Tom's Florida 
house and other material property — there 
is no reason to print the terms of Tom's 
settlement with her. But Tom has the an- 
swer to that little problem, too. "I'm build- 
ing Bo a new house here in Florida," he 
said. "Northfield or Florida, wherever Bo 
is, that's home to me. And, in a few 
months, that's where I'll be . . . home." 



Never a Dull Moment 



(Continued from page 57) 
days," he says, "and then, ten days later, 
I got out of bed and did the back yard." 

Their ranch-style home is painted in 
Pennsylvania Dutch red with white trim- 
mings. Their furnishings — like Judith 
herself — are noted for an air of serenity. 
Put it all in a picture -postcard and you've 
set the scene for the family of a success- 
ful, happy young businessman, rather 
than an actor. But . . . 

It's a complex hut. Larry is a serious 
but never somber, imaginative but not 
whacky, lively but never frivolous kind of 
guy. "He's volatile," says Judy. "There's 
never a dull moment with him. He makes 
decisions on the spur of the moment. He 
walks at a run and he does nothing half- 
way. If he's tired, he takes a ten-minute 
nap then snaps back like a rubber band." 

"The bxit has to do with the actor's ego,'" 
Larry says, "which keeps you living in a 
couple or more worlds. Now, I remember 
when I was overseas in an anti-aircraft 
outfit and, the first night we were in com- 
bat, I climbed out of the control dugout 
where I was supposed to stay. Like an 
officer in the movies, I figured my place 
was with my men. And then one of the 
men came up to me and said, 'Lieutenant, 
we can't fire. You're standing right in 
front of the gun.' So I went back to my 
dugout, but my actor's ego was sure try- 
ing hard to be a hero." 

In his part of Chris Kendall, on CBS- 
TV's Valiant Lady, there is a bit of the 
swashbuckler, a worldly, sophisticated 
quality, a trace of glamour. 'This is not 
accidental, either. It is all part of the 
complex make-up of Lawrence Weber. 

Larry is Uterally a child of the theater. 
An uncle was one-half of the famous 
Weber and Field comedy duo. Larry's 
mother was Edith Hallor, a Ziegfeld star 
and one of the most beautiful singing 
actresses of her day. She sang in Victor 
Herbert productions and opposite such 
greats as John Charles Thomas. Larry's 
father, Lawrence Weber, Sr., was a thea- 
trical producer. 

His parents were divorced when he was 
an infant, and Larry was raised by his 
father. He was soon as much at home in 
a box office and backstage as he was in a 
nursery. He traveled widely and met 
famous people in business and government 
and the arts. Among his father's friends 
and his "uncles" were such men as Arthur 
Hammerstein and the Shuberts. He lived 
in a fashionable Park Avenue apartment. 
He had a nurse and a governess and tu- 
tors. He was a lonely boy. Many of his 
best friends were the service men in his 
apartment building, elevator boys and the 
doorman, and cab drivers. 

He "prepped" at Horace Mann School, 
where one of his friends and classmates 
was Keenan Wynn. It was there that 
Larry won a silver cup in the senior box- 
ing division. "The pride over the boxing 
cup lasted only ten minutes," Larry notes. 
"Right after I got it at a school assembly, 
a guy who had neglected to sign up 
for boxing walked up to me and said, 
'You're not so tough,' and knocked me 
down." 

In his early teens, Larry already had his 
heart set on being an actor. His father 
wasn't very encouraging. "Fathers are 
funny," Larry observes. "They'll back 
you up in everything except the career 
you choose. They never trust your judg- 
ment there." 

But Lawrence, Sr. got Lawrence, Jr. his 
first job, which was in summer stock at 
Deer Lake, Pennsylvania. In the same 
company was another youngster, beauti- 
ful Celeste Holm. Larry was fifteen. 



"My first part was that of the servant, 
Mose, in 'Pursuit of Happiness,' and my 
father came down to see me." He re- 
calls: "I was anxious to impress him. It 
was one of the important auditions in my 
life." After the show, Larry drove his 
father to the station to catch a train. His 
father said simply, "Son, you've got it." 

He asked only that Larry finish his edu- 
cation, and Larry tried. He got as far as 
college at New York University, and stuck 
through his first year, before he quit to 
go into stock again. A little over a year 
later, he appeared in his first Broadway 
play, "The Man Who Killed Lincoln," and 
the play opened in his father's own thea- 
ter. 

Larry has appeared in other Broadway 
productions — "My Romance," "Of Thee I 
Sing," "Courtin' Time," "Hazel Flagg." It 
is not sheerly coincidental that these are 
musicals — and therein lies a story. For 
years, Larry had been kept doing things 
about his voice. "You know, people 
would hear me sing and say, 'You've got a 
fine voice. You should do something 
about it.' " 

His voice teachers were most enthusias- 
tic. In Larry they thought they had a 
great big, strong tenor, and in the operatic 
business a great big, strong tenor is as 
rare as solvency. A man who can roast 
peanut heaven with a high C names his 
own price. "So I kept studying to be a 
tenor," Larry says, "but some friends sug- 
gested I was a baritone." 

One of the teachers insisted that Larry 
beg, borrow or steal to get to Paris and 
make his start as a tenor in French opera. 
She was so insistent that he felt he had 
to prove a point, so Larry sang for John 
Fearnley, who was auditioning singers for 
the musical "South Pacific." Mr. Fearnley 
listened, and then Mr. Fearnley said, 
"Thank you, Mr. Weber. We will con- 
sider you for the understudy of Ezio 
Pinza." And, as the world knows, Ezio 
Pinza is quite a baritone. 

At that precise moment, Larry gave up 
thoughts of opera, but he's never stopped 
studying voice, for one of his ambitions 
is to succeed as an actor-singer. He hopes 
that, one of these days, Chris Kendall may 
have a chance to sing. "Chris is one of 
my favorite parts, anyway," he says. "A 
story like Valiant Lady is concerned with 
beauty and warmth, and I enjoy doing it." 

There is a lot of excitement in playing 
the role of an airline pilot, and it isn't all 
in the make-believe. Things happen. For 
instance, there was the day that Flora 
Campbell made her debut as Helen Emer- 
son. "I remember telling her how ex- 
tremely well-coordinated and smooth the 
production was," Larry grins. 

That day, the script called for Flora to 
be at the airport anxiously awaiting Lar- 
ry's arrival. Larry was piloting his plane 
from Johannesburg and was in somewhat 
desperate circumstances. Larry and his 
co-pilot were flying blind, lost over the 
ocean. They were in one of the worst 
storms of the season. They hadn't much 
fuel — maybe enough to fiU a half-dozen 
jelly glasses. And the radio wasn't work- 
ing. And one engine was on fire. 

There was a camera on Flora at the air- 
port, and two on the cockpit of the plane 
itself. There were a total of ninety 
"camera cues" in eleven minutes of script 
— or an average of about one cue every 
seven seconds, which calls for mighty 
quick thinking and the closest kind of 
coordination. Naturally, nerves were on 
edge and the situation was very tense. 

"There was a humorous side to all this, 
for I had told Flora how easy it always 
was. But she was amused, too. After it 




Eileen 
Parker 

. . . lovely singing star of 
Don McNeill's TV Breakfast 
Club for IV2 years . . . ac- 
claimed by thousands for her 
singing of your favorite 
hymns. 

Sings your favorite HYMNS 
on New Enduring Records 



SEND NO MONEY-Hear These 
Inspiring Hymns in Your Own Home! 

Let Eileen Parker bring the light of ioy into your 
home with her world-renowned singing of these 
lovely sacred songs, just as she sang them on the 
Breakfast Club. Don't send money — just circle your 
favorite hymns on the coupon below, and mail now. 
We'll rush the records, and when they arrive, just 
pay postman $1.50 for each record ordered, plus 
small postage and C.O.D. fees, and the records are 
yours to enjoy. 

Unconditional Money-Back Guarantee 

Unless you're thrilled and delighted by Eileen's 
hymns, return the records and we'll refund every 
cent you paid, at once! Each record will endure for 
many years. Available on standard 78 RPM or 45 
RPM records. 

Select Titles Below and Circle on Coupon 



Understands 

n Evening Prayer— 

^ Living for Jesus 



M Rugged Cross — No One 



Ever Cored For Me Lil<e Jesus 

5 My Cathedral— Why I Pray 

O Heartoches — Some- f. In The Garden — Go To 
•» Hnu Ho'll Mnko It O Church Every Sunday 



day He'll Moke I 
Plain 



T Softly and Tenderly — 
' Another Door Will Open 

Mica Recording Co., 108 N. State St., Dept. 1056, Chicago 2, III. 



Send No Money— Mai/ Coupon NOW! 



Mica Recording Co., 108 N. State St., Dept. 1056, CliicaEO 2, III. 
Rush me Eileen Parker Hymn Records I have circled 
below. I'll Day postman SI. 50 for each record plus 
small postage and C.O.D. charge. If not delighted, I 
may return records for full immediate refund. (Enclose 
payment and we pay postage. Same guarantee.) 
Circle Record No's, below: Check speed: 

1234567 78 RPM D 45 RPM 

Addres9-._ . 

City , - State 



iiNisHHIGH SCHOOLniW^ 



No classes to attend. Easy spare-time train- 1 
ing covers big choice of subjects. Friendly \ 
instructors; standard texts. Full credit for^ 
previous schooling. Diploma awarded. 
Write now for FREE catalog! 

WAYNE SCHOOL Catalog HH-25 
2S27 Sheffield Ave., Chicago 14, IllinoiSy 



w ^ w w w 

Want to Get Rid of ' 
Dark or Discolored Skin, 
Freckles, Skin Spots?] 



Famous Mercolized Wax Cream 
7 NIGHT PLAN Lightens, 
Beautifies Skin While You Sleep 

Just follow the amazing Mercolized Wax 
Cream? NIGHT PLAN to a whiter, softer, 
lovelier skin. Smooth rich, luxurious Mer- 
colized Wax Cream on your face or arms 
just before retiring each night for one week. 
You'll begin to see results almost 
at once . . . lightens dark skin, 
blotches, spots, freckles as if by 
magic! This is not a cover up cos- 
metic; Mercolized Wax Cream 
works UNDER the skin surface. 
Beautiful women have used this 
time -tested plan for over 40 years — you'll 
love it's fast, sure, longer lasting results! 
Mercolized Wax Cream is sold on 100% guar- 
antee or money back. Start using it now! 




I 




Lightens dark 
skin and ugly 
spats almost 
overnight. 



IV ^'f.,*^ MERCOLIZED WAX CREAM 

At All Drug and Cosmetic Counters 



T 
V 
R 

93 



Shrinks Hemorrhoids 
New Way Without Surgery 

Science Finds Healing Substance That 
Relieves Pain—' Shrinks Hemorrhoids 

For the first time science has found a 
new healing substance with the astonishing 
ability to shrink hemorrhoids and to relieve 
pain — without surgery. 

In case after case, while gently relieving 
pain, actual reduction (shrinkage) took 
place. 

Most amazing of all — results were so 
thorough that sufferers made astonishing 
statements like "Piles have ceased to be a 
problem!" 

The secret is a new healing substance 
(Bio-Dyne*) — discovery of a world-famous 
research institute. 

This substance is now available in sup- 
pository or ointment form under the name 
Preparation H* Ask for it at all drug count- 
ers—money back guarantee. *Beg. U. S. Pat. Off. 




INGROWN NAIL 

Hurting You? 

Immediate 
Relief! 



A few drops of OUTGRO® bring blessed relief from 
tormenting pain of Ingrown nail. OUTGRO tough- 
ens the skin underneath the nail, allows the nail to 
be cut and thus prevents further pain and discom- 
fort. OUTGRO is available at aU drug counters. 



ASTHMA RELIEF 



Ask for free booklet "The Problem That Torments 
Thousands" , also Information about our 10 day Free 
Sample of Nephron Inhalant. Bronchial Asthma spasms 
relieved quickly (usually within one minute). Most 
stubborn cases respond. Write - 

NEPHRON, 305A Wostena Terrace, Ridgewood, N. J. 



MATERNITY 
STYLE CATALOG 



SAVE MONEY-Shop by Mail! FREE cata- 
log pictures hundreds of exclusive ma- 
ternity fashions. World'3 Largest. Complete 
Selection, Dresses, Suits, Mix & Match Sep- 
arates, Sportswear, Girdles, Lingerie; $2.98 
to %22.9S, Catalog mailed in plain envelope. 

C RAWFORD'S 

Dept 35, 8015WornallKansasCityl4,Mo. 



'''How to Make Money with 
^.^^^ Simple Cartoons'' 





obligation. Simply address 



ARTOONISTS' EXCHANGE 
Dept. 597 Pleasant Hill, Ohio 

THIS AD IS 
WORTH MONEY! 

Let us show you how to make big money in your 
spare time by helping us take orders for maga- 
zine subscriptions. Write today for FREE money- 
making information: 

MACFADDEN PUBLICATIONS 
205 E, 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 




^ENLARGEMENT 

* o/youf Fai/of/fe Photo 



T 
V 
R 

94 



FROM FAMOUS HOUYWOOD FILM STUDIOS 

, Just to get acquainted, we will 
make you a beautiful studio qual- 
ity 5 x 7 enlargement of any snap- 
shot, photo or negative. Be sure 
to include color of hair, eyes and 
clothing, and get our Bargain 
Offer for having your enlarge- 
ment beautifully hand-colored in 
oil and mounted in a handsome frame. Limit 2 
to a customer. Please enclose 10<f to cover cost of 
handling and mailing each enlargement. Original 
returned. We will pay $100.00 for children's or 
adults pictures used in our advertising. Act NOW! 

HOLLYWOOD FILM STUDIOS, Dept. F-81 
7021 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood 38, Calif. 



was over, she asked, 'Now what do we do 
for an encore?' " (Incidentally, during the 
whole, taut performance, there wasn't a 
cue missed or a line of dialogue lost.) 

Larry's previous television experience, to 
mention a few shows, includes Kraft Thea- 
ter, Love Of Life, Studio One, and Rob- 
ert Montgomery Presents. But, to trace 
the first meeting of Larry and his wife 
Judy, you must go back to the very early 
days of his career — back in 1939, when 
both were acting in stock companies. The 
circumstances were not unusual — but the 
people were. 

"We were rehearsing for a summer thea- 
ter at Wilkes-Barre," Larry recalls. "Most 
of us were together for the first time." He 
and Judith Cargill were complete stran- 
gers, but she didn't want to keep it that 
way. At rehearsal she introduced herself. 
"I remember my reaction," Larry says. "I 
remember turning to a friend, after Judy 
went back to her corner, and saying, 'I 
wonder who that old girl is?'" 

The "old girl" was barely twenty-one 
and fresh out of the American Academy 
of Dramatic Arts. She had been raised in 
Milwaukee by a non-show-business fam- 
ily. She was a brilliant student who broke 
scholastic records and won scholarships 
everywhere. But, when Judy graduated 
from the Academy, she had a notion she 
was destined to do character parts — and 
she dressed like one. "At rehearsals," 
Larry recalls, "she was usually over in a 
corner half-hidden behind owlish glasses 
and a book." 

Luckily, they were to play summer 
stock. Summer meant hot days, and hot 
days meant that, when they arrived at 
Wilkes-Barre, one of the first things the 
company did was to head for a lake and 
a swim. "And when I saw Judy in a swim 
suit," says Larry, "I knew positively that 
she wasn't an 'old girl.' " 

rJy fall they were unofficially engaged. 
The following summer, Larry had a 
diamond stickpin of his father's converted 
into an engagement ring for Judy. In 
January of 1941, they were married, and 
moved into a small apartment until Larry 
was drafted. 

As an enlisted man, Larry was stationed 
most of his first two years in Panama. As 
an officer, he spent the next couple of 
years in Europe. His outfit was on the 
beach at Normandy and then, for a few 
weeks, he fought the "Battle of Cham- 
pagne" in Paris, finally 'moving to the 
much-bombed port at Antwerp. 

Judy was working in a noisy medium, 
too — though in quite a different sense — for 
that was when she did radio work in a 
big way. Today, she is among the top ten 
or so "most employed" television and radio 
actresses. In the past few months, she has 
been seen on Justice and the Philco and 
Ford dramatic programs, to name a few. 
Since stock days at Wilkes-Barre, she has 
appeared in two Broadway shows, "Years 
Ago," with Fredric March, and "How I 
Wonder," with Raymond Massey. 

Judy Cargill Weber is a stunning young 
woman who could be a hving testimonial 
for either of Larry's sponsors on Valiant 
Lady. She has lustrous reddish brown 
hair, which should be a smiling matter for 
Toni, and she bakes delicious chocolate 
cakes — which certainly shouldn't makel 
General Mills mad. 

"And she's got it up here," Larry says, 
tapping his forehead. "When we tuned in 
to the old Information Please program, she 
not only answered questions before the ex- 
perts, but most of the time she answered 
questions they couldn't!" 

There are three other members of the 
Weber household: Jay, seven, David, four 
— and Penny, a kind of miniature Dober- 
man who barks every time Larry comes on 
TV. Jay was legally named Judith, after 



her mother and so, for a while, they called 
her Judith, Jr., then J. J. and now, simply. 
Jay. Larry still carries in his wallet the 
first note Jay wrote him. Whenever Jay is 
reprimanded by her mother, she turns to 
Judith, Sr., and says, "You're upsetting 
me." And, whenever Jay thinks Larry is 
singing too loudly, she reprimands him. 

As for living in the suburbs, Larry says, 
"My wife and I prefer the city, but we 
moved out for the children's sake." David 
has made great strides in the country. He 
has discovered that all you do to kiss a 
girl is ask her to say, "Prunes" — and he is 
improving the diction of most little girls 
in the neighborhood. 

For economical reasons, the Webers en- 
joy do-it-yourself projects. They painted 
their house, dug vegetable and flower gar- 
dens, converted a dining table into a cof- 
fee table, put up shelves, and decorated 
the kids' rooms. Perhaps their most in- 
genious do-it-yourself project was making 
do without a television receiver. That was 
during their first summer in the country, 
when they sat on the lawn and focused 
binoculars on a neighbor's set. 

"We found his taste in shows agreeable," 
Larry recalls, "but he hadn't made any 
provision for keeping us warm when sum- 
mer passed, so we had to move inside and 
buy our own set." 

Their home is furnished in a pleasant 
potr-ourri of modern and Victorian and 
needlepoint. The reason for this is that 
mucl: of their furniture has been in- 
herited. 

As you come through the front door into 
the foyer, you walk into a pair of Dickens 
silhouettes and Judy's family crest from 
Rolleston-On-Downs. About this time, if 
you are partial to olives or grass, you feel 
at home — for Judy is partial to green. All 
of the carpeting downstairs and parts of 
the walls in the living and dining rooms 
are green. There are two antique mir- 
rors on the parlor wall and — symbolic of 
Judy's desire to visit England — a decora- 
tive map of London. 

The bedroom walls are papered in cheer- 
ful blues and yellows. David has plaid 
and Jay has pussy willows. The master 
bedroom boasts a couple of massive, state- 
ly English bureaus, with marble tops, 
which Larry inherited from his father. The 
bedroom also serves as the music room: 
"We have no piano, and so I just go into 
the bedroom, close the door and sound off." 

Larry enjoys music and will sing when 
he's showering or when he's weeding the 
garden. It hasn't damaged the plumbing, 
and his vegetables and flowers did well, 
except for the aforementioned apple tree. 

"This is a different kind of life," Larry 
observes, "at odds with the kind of show 
business my parents knew." It's not just 
the fooling around with cucumbers and 
rutabaga. There's the continual putter- 
ing and repairing of the house, as well as 
the teaching of Sunday school. There's 
the business of getting up between six and 
seven-thirty, a time when self-respecting 
actors of other days were just going to 
bed. Larry and Judy take turns getting 
the beef tea and toast for their kids, so 
that every other day one parent gets to 
sleep until eight — except on days when 
Larry is in Valiant Lady. Those days, he 
must be up before six, in order to make 
the eight-thirty rehearsal in Manhattan. 

But Larry's not complaining about the 
hours or the uncooperative apple tree or 
the lack of seats on his commuter train. 
He just smiles and says, "You know, they 
say artists are supposed to suffer." Then, 
more seriously, he adds: "I've got a lot 
to be grateful and happy about . . ." 

As Judy has phrased it, "There's never 
a dull moment with Larry." But it makes 
for peace and contentment in the Weber 
family, and that's just the way they love it. 



The Magic of Erin 



(Continued from page 54) 
programs — her Columbia album of twelve 
recordings would carry her voice all over 
America and even back to her native 
Ireland. That she would sing in American 
night clubs where sons and daughters of 
Elrin, long years away from home — but not 
ordinarily frequenting American night 
clubs — would come hesitantly but hun- 
grily to hear the old melodies, feeling 
almost as if they were back across the 
sea once more, moved by the memories 
Carmel's songs stirred up in them. 

There had been dancing, too, in those 
days of Carmel's growing up. Some of her 
relatives disapproved of her wanting to 
dance, but this was also in her heart, and 
she could no more keep her feet from 
following the music than she could her 
voice. She used to slip off to dancing 
classes, worrying her sister Betty — a year 
and a half her senior — who, while she 
sympathized with Carmel's ambitions, felt 
an older sister's responsibility toward her. 

Carmel would love every minute of the 
classes — until there came the inevitable 
day when the teacher would begin to 
prepare the pupils for some little charity 
performance or a hospital benefit. "Public 
performances meant costumes, and that 
meant exit, for me. Because of them. I left 
more dance classes than I can remember. 
Without confessing to the family, there 
was no way of my getting a costume. But, 
up to that point, I always had a mar- 
velous time." 

Singing, of course, was something 
different — as long as it wasn't professional. 
So Carmel went on singing, all the years 
she was becoming a pretty and slim young 
woman of five-foot-six, with masses of 
waving auburn-red hair, gentle blue eyes, 
and a speaking voice so soft and melodious 
it would charm a bird off a branch. (Even 
now, when she comes out on the stage of 
the television theater, audiences gasp a 
little at how much prettier she is in 
person than she actually photographs. "It's 
better that way, than that they should be 
disappointed," she says.) 

Then Carmel's sister Betty married 
Christy Keough, who knew people in the 
theater, especially in Dublin's famous 
Theater Royal. Christy heard that the 
Royal was looking for a girl singer, and 
he told Carmel about it, made an appoint- 
ment for an audition, and off they went. 

Her voice still carries some of the excite- 
ment of that first audition, as she talks 



about it. "Up to this time, I was just fool- 
ing around with my singing, but this was 
a real job and I got more scared every 
minute, as we waited my turn. There were 
a lot of girls ahead of me — and, about 
three quarters through, I suddenly ran out 
of the theater, with Christy at my heels, 
urging me to come back. It was dreadful 
of me, after him getting the appointment. 
He made another one for the next day, and 
I promised to see it through. 

"There was another long line-up of girls, 
all sopranos, all singing bits of operatic 
songs, the same as the day before. This 
man who was listening, an Englishman 
who is a fine musician and showman, kept 
stopping them short in the middle of a 
song and saying, 'Leave your name and 
address, please.' He seemed to be getting 
more and more bored. I could see it was 
the same old story to him. I wondered 
what would happen when my turn came." 

Memories of that afternoon surging 
through her mind, Carmel says: "The less 
you know, the simpler life is. Now I am 
learning that it isn't as simple as I thought 
then. I was so very young, so green, so 
inexperienced. I had walked in, without 
music — the other girls all carried music 
cases. My hands were thrust into my coat 
pockets. The other girls were dressed up. 
I wore my simple everyday clothes. No one 
at home even suspected I was auditioning 
for a job. 

"I was the last of the girls that day, and 
I could see how tired this man was get- 
ting. He asked what I was going to sing 
for him, and I answered, 'Anything.' Can 
you imagine anyone saying such a thing 
at an audition? When he wanted to know 
what music I had with me, I had to tell 
him I had brought nothing. 

" 'You must be wonderful,' he said, and 
I heard the sarcasm in his voice. 'You 
can sing anything, and you need no music! 
Do you know Brahms' Lullaby?' I had 
learned it at school but, because I had 
never taken singing lessons, I had never 
been coached in any songs. I said I could 
sing it, and he asked what key. 'Any key,' 
I told him. Now he was really annoyed. 
'You must be marvelous!' He looked 
toward the organist who was going to ac- 
company me. 'Play it,' he said. 

"To this day, I don't know what in- 
spired me to sing an octave lower than 
the accompaniment, which was keyed to 
a soprano. Perhaps it was because my 
voice is naturally lower than that, but 




Carmel and her husband Bill first met in Dublin when she sang in 
one of his ballrooms, were married in 1953, and have a "wee baby." 



Gehtle 

Ex-Lax Helps 

YOUR CHILD TOWARD 

His Normal 
Regularily 



AT BEDTIME give your 
child America's best- 
tasting laxative— choco- 
lated Ex-Lax. There 
will be no fuss because 
it's so pleasant to take. 

IN THE MORNING 

he'll get gentle relief — 
the closest thing to 
natural action. No up- 
set, no griping, no em- 
barrassing urgency. 




NEXT DAY— Ex-Lax will continue to help your 
child toward his normal regularify. He'll hardly 
ever have to take Ex-Lax again the next night! 

Buy The New 65^ Size — Save As Much As 37< 

Also available in 304 and 124 sizes 

EX-LAX 

THE CHOCOLATED LAXATIVE 



MORE PEOPLE USE EX-LAX THAN ANY OTHER LAXATIVE 



HOW TO MAKE MONEY! 

I am going to show you a simple plan by 
which you can pick up enough extra money 
every week to help you pay for extra nylons, 
blouses, and all the other accessories that 
make a girl's life happier. Just send me your 
name and address for FREE information on 
how to make money taking magazine sub- 
scription orders. No obligation. Macfadden 
Publications, 205 East 42 St., New York 17, N. Y. 




SWINGING 

"Hot Canary" 

EARRINGS 

ONLY $1.00 

We Pay Tax 

The adorable lifelike ca- 
naries ACTUALLY SWING 
back and forth, perched 
inside each of these ex- . 

citing, attractive earrings. The hoops are generous sized, 
in a brilliant gold color finish. The colorful canaries are 
made of feather-like material in bright red, yellow and blue. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed or Money Back 
Thev add that finishing touch to any ensemble, and their 
eye-catching "swing-and-sway" motion stirs up excite- 
ment and gay conversation whenever you wear them. Screw- 
back style. You'll be delighted. Add 15c to each pair 
ordered for postage and handling:. No C.O.D.'s please. 

Dobbs Products Co. ,900 W.Lake St., Dept. 365, Chicago? J II. 



DOUBLE YOUR EARNINGS WITH 

ChristmasCard Bargain Specials 



SELL 
50 CARD ^ 

ASSORTMENT 



SUPPLY 
LIMITED! 
ORDER 
EARLY! 



Get $1.25 e A«f 
Boxes for 3 Vr 



Get FREE List of Factory Surplus Greeting Card \ 

Bargains and make the biggest profits ever, while 
supply lasts. Christmas. Everyday, Religious, 
Wraps included. All first quality. Also Free Color 
Catalog, over 200 newest Card Assortments and 
Imprints, Gifts and Gadgets. Amazing Catalog 
Shopping Plan. No experience needed. We'll send 
Bargain List, 4 new 1955 boxes on approval and 
Personalized Samples FREE, if you write atonce. 

MIDWEST CARD COMPANY 

1 1 13 Washington Ave. Dept, 419-B,St. Louis 1, Mo. 



T 

V 
R 

95 



more probably it was because I, too, was 
tired by then of listening to all those high 
notes. He listened attentively, and some 
of his boredom seemed to fall away and he 
let me finish. And he gave me the job." 

It was the beginning of facing audiences 
and of forgetting herself in her music, of 
learning to remain completely natural on 
any stage. After the Royal engagement, 
she sang in other theaters and ballrooms 
in Dublin and in London. In Dublin, a 
yoimg man named Bill Fuller gave her a 
job in his Crystal Ballroom, and later 
Carmel sang in his London ballrooms. To- 
day, Bill says he fell in love with Carmel 
the first time he saw her, but she was too 
career-minded then to think of romance. 
Two years later, however, Carmel said yes 
to Bill's proposal and they were quietly 
married in London on April 20, 1953. 

Of course, Carmel was still devoted to 
her singing. She had long engagements 
with Johnny Devlin's orchestra and the 
famous Ambrose orchestra, and she made 
her radio debut on the BBC. 

All the while, however, the leprechauns 
went on whispering, telling her to save 
her money and go to America. Bill's own 
business interests kept him going back and 
forth across the Atlantic and he felt sure 
that, if Carmel could get over her fright 
about American audiences, she would do 
very well. There were close friends of 
the Quinns with whom they could live in 
New York and — while Bill was over here 
to help her get started — she decided to 
chance it and fly over — for a visit, at least. 
That was in March of last year. Her family 
was almost too excited to realize she was 
really going, and she wasn't feeling any 
too calm about it herself — especially since 
she was expecting her first child in three 
months. 

Not having sung professionally for a few 
months before leaving Ireland, she decided 
she might need coaching before she faced 
new audiences. Freddie Romano, a voice 
coach, listened to her one day and liked 
her voice. "But now we must teach you a 
nice, popular American number," he said. 

She went to him several times. "He 
was a very good coach and very kind and 
helpful to me, and one day he telephoned 
to say my name was down for a Talent 
Scouts audition, on the following Wednes- 
day. He said that he felt I was ready for it. 

"I had been listening to radio and watch- 
ing television and wondering if I would 
ever have a chance to be on them. I was 
thrilled — and scared, too. We rehearsed 



and rehearsed the number I was going to 
sing — a popular melody, '^Vhat Is This 
Thing Called Love?' It was the first song 
Mr. Romano had taught me. But, when it 
came time for the audition, Esther StoU 
of the Godfrey staff — a wonderfully expert 
and understanding person — suggested that 
a girl from Dublin ought to do an Irish 
song. 

Carmel looked at the pianist, Graham 
Forbes. He had never heard the melody 
she named, but he followed her flawlessly 
and everyone seemed pleased. They asked 
her to return the next day to sing for 
some of the others. 

Jack Carney (Art Carney's brother) was 
one of them, and he suggested a little song 
he knew. She said she knew it, too, but 
she sang it in Gaelic, the only way she 
had ever sung it at home. They didn't 
seem to mind that, at all, and she was 
asked to return that night for a third 
audition. So, once more, she sang some of 
her Irish songs, and then they told her 
she would be on the Talent Scouts pro- 
gram the following Monday, October 18. 

"I was a wreck by this time," Carmel 
smiles, "after three auditions in two days! 
The excitement was getting me down. I 
had never dreamed they would put me on 
so fast. Others had waited months before 
the right spot for them opened on a show. 
Here I was, going on before I scarcely 
knew what was happening to me!" 

Mary Corrigan, Carmel's cousin, who 
had come to America a year before she 
did, acted as her Scout — and made such 
a personal, hit on the show that Carmel 
thought she herself would never get a 
chance to perform. "I thought Mary 
would be shy, but she felt at home with 
Mr. Godfrey right away and he liked 
her and they got along famously. She is 
one of fourteen children, and they talked 
about life in a big family of kids in Ireland. 
I was the last to appear — and there I was, 
waiting, wondering if they would ever get 
finished before the time was up." 

Carmel finally came out, and sang "How 
Can You Buy KiUarney?" The audience 
loved it and, when it came to the "curtain 
calls" of all the talent — and of course 
Carmel was last again — she never even 
got to open her mouth because of the 
applause. She couldn't believe it was hap- 
pening, and she just stood there crying 
with excitement and happiness. 

"Mr. Godfrey saw how it was with me, 
and he came over and patted me and put 
his arm around my shoulders. I can't find 



96 



I learned about 
MY OWN DAUGHTER! 

Countless lisfeners have been amazed to learn 
vital things about their own families on radio's "My 
True Story." The reason is that this thrilling 
program presents moving stories that are 
as real as life itself — taken right from the 
files of "True Story Magazine." So be 
sure to hear these emotion-packed dramas 
that may help you to a better understanding 
of the ones you love! 

TUNE IN 

"MY TRUE STORY" 

American Broadcasting Stations 

Her demands for luxuries pushed him into a life of crime. Read "THEY SENT 
HIM TO PRISON" in July TRUE STORY MAGAZINE at newsstands now. 




words to say how good he was then, and 
how good he has been ever since." 

Even with all the help and kindness 
Carmel has had from everyone — from 
Godfrey and all the others responsible for 
the programs, from husband Bill, who hay 
been managing her career— all this is still 
just a bit overwhelming for a girl in her 
twenties who has been in this country only 
a little more than a year and has shot right 
up to one of the top entertainment spots 
and become a personality known to mil- 
lions. When the St. Patrick's Day program 
of Arthur Godfrey And His Friends was 
built around her last March, she wondered 
how she could possibly be good enough to 
live up to all the things that were ex- 
pected of her. 

The very next evening, March 17, she 
gave a St. Patrick's Day concert of her 
own in Carnegie Hall — a name synony- 
mous with great musical talent for several 
generations — and, once more, she was 
afraid she could not live up to it. But, 
on both evenings, the thing happened that 
always happens to Carmel Quinn — she 
faced all those people and forgot every- 
thing but the joy of making music and 
knowing that it was bringing joy to others. 

When Carmel came here, her brother- 
in-law Christy warned her that New 
York is a hard place and she must not let 
anyone ask her to do more than she 
reasonably could. She hasn't found it 
hard, but she sometimes misses the long 
walks she took at home, and the window- 
shopping, and stopping for tea with the 
girls while they talked about the new 
clothes they had bought. Now she scur- 
ries from place to place in taxis, and buys 
clothes wherever she can, on the run! 
Weekdays, her routine is getting up at 
6:30 A.M. for early rehearsals at the CBS 
studio, and going to bed at 9:00 P.M. so 
she can look and do her best the next 
morning. Every spare moment and every 
weekend, however, are devoted to her lit- 
tle daughter, Jane Ann, who is just one 
year old. With true motherly pride, Carmel 
says Jane is a darling child and very good. 
"And I'm so pleased that Jane looks exact- 
ly like Bill." Carmel is sure Jane will be 
musical, too. "Already," she says, "when 
we put Jane near the television set, she 
dances in time to the music." 

Carmel and Bill now have their own 
apartment in uptown New York, within 
easy driving distance of their work. In ad- 
dition to being Carmel's manager. Bill 
owns a restaurant called The Dublin, 
which is located in mid-Manhattan. 

Sometime this summer, Carmel hopes to 
go back to Dublin for a visit. To see the 
green of the Emerald Isle — "like no other 
green in the world." To see her daddy, 
who is so excited about her success — 
and can hardly wait to see little Jane — 
that he can talk of little else. To see Betty 
and Christy and their little girl, and her 
brother Naoish and his wife, and her 
brother Kevin and his wife and children. 

"At first, I planned to surprise them 
with a visit," she says. "I thought it would 
be dramatic to walk in unexpectedly. Now 
I know that would not be fair at all. But 
when I go back, if I can't walk in and 
sit down and visit a while and talk, and 
then do the things I alvvays did at home — 
like sweeping the floor and helping with 
the dishes and all the things like that — 
it will not seem like home. 

"I want to remember just how I felt, 
so long ago, when I stole away to sing 
and dance in that cold little pantry — and 
saw myself in America, up on a stage. And 
to think about all the wonderful things 
that have been happening to me ever 
since, and to take time to be grateful for 
them." 

Sure the leprechauns must be waiting 
there for Carmel Quinn! 





e a u 





u I c/ta t 



C 



K 



THERE ARE THREE BRECK SHAMPOOS 
FOR THREE DIFFERENT HAIR CONDITIONS 

You will enjoy using a Breck Shampoo because it cleans 



in action to be used on 
Breck Shampoos. One 

Another Breck Shampoo 
Shampoo is for normal 



thoroughly, yet is gentle enough 

little children. There are three 

Breck Shampoo is for dry hair. 

is for oily hair. A third Breck 

hair. The next time you buy a shampoo, select the Breck 

Shampoo for your individual hair condition. A Breck Shampoo 

leaves your hair clean, shining and naturally beautiful. 

The Three Breck Shampoos are available at Beauty Shops, Drug Stores, Department Stores and wherever cosmetics are sold. 



JOHN H BRECK 
NEW YORK 



MANUFACTURING CHEMIST 
CHICAGO ■ 5AN FRA 

Copyright 1955 by John H. Breck Inc 



SPRINGFIELD ; 
CISCO O T T 



MASSACHUSETTS 
W A CANADA 



That ^oi:^ Look 



Young America has it 
ydu ean have it in 7 days! 



Baby's in the pink . . . with That Ivory Look! 

Why not you? Pure, mild Ivory cherishes 

her pink and precious skin . . . yours, too! 

For the milder your beauty soap, the prettier 

your skin . . . more doctors advise Ivory 

for your complexion than any soap! 





I 
f 








«;M 



** •• 






You're in the swim . . . with That Ivory Look! 
Start cleansing your skin regularly with pure, 
mild Ivory. In 7 days see it perk up . . . 
look younger, fresher, finer. It's the 
pink of perfection — That Ivory Look! 




99.tt% pure.it floats 




More doctors advise Ivory than any other soap 



THAT IVORY LOOK 



YOUNG AMERICA HAS IT... 

YOU CAN HAVE IT I N 7 DAYS! 

Polka-dot tot . . . she has That Ivory Look ! 

And isn't it a pretty look for you to have? Remember, 

the milder your beauty soap, the prettier 

your skin. More doctors recommend pure, mild Ivory 

for Baby's skin — and yours — than any other 

soap ! Ivory takes care ... so tenderly ! 





s* 




1 


^^^g-^wl^ .'1^'^ 


^^^nSf m •» 


'^^S J0^^f**'*»m»^ 


fm 




m 


^^^iHHRI 


w- 




I 



l/,J^t1=4 



It's like getting one FREE! 4 cakes 

of Personal Size Ivory cost about 

the same as 3 cakes of other leading 

toilet soaps. It all adds up . . . 



PERSONAL SIZE IVORY IS YOUR BEST BEAUTY BUY! 



New! Doctor's deodorant discovery 
now safely stops odor 24 hours a day 





> 




J. Imi, 



I 





4 



/^Guaranteed by*^ This Seol Certifies that New Mum with M-3 

Good Housekeeping 

^^««Bi.st»:o£22>^ won't irritate normal skin or damage fabrics 



Even if you're as busy as a nurse — de- 
pendable New Mum keeps you fresh ! 
This original doctor's formula now con- 
tains M-3, an invisible ingredient that 
keeps on destroying odor bacteria 24 
hours a day. 

New Mum is so dependable— it's used 
by more women than any other deodor- 
ant or anti-perspirant ! Gentle, safe . . . 
New Mum contains no harsh astringents 



. . . will not block pores or irritate nor- 
mal skin. Delicately fragrant and 
creamier — stays moist in the jar. 

Good Housekeeping Magazine ac- 
cepts New MUM... certifies it will not rot 
fabrics of any kind. Also approved by 
the American Institute of Laundering. 

So change to dependable New MUM 
today! At any toiletry counter in the 
milk-white jar with the bright red cap. 



New Mum 



® 



cream deodorant 



with long-lasting M-3 



(hexachlorophene) 




Proved in comparison tests made 
by a doctor. A deodorant without 
M-3, tested under one arm, stopped 
perspiration odor only a few hours. 
Yet, New Mum with M-3, tested un- 
der the other arm, stopped odor for 
a full 24 hours. 



- «««««■ It 



JH::^ 




Another fine Product of Bristol-Myers 



lainpdX 
IuIIH 



in a ftw words : 



// 



// 



The purpose of Tampax is jo 
give women generally more 
comfort, convenience and 
freedom during that period 
each month when sanitary mm 
protection is needed. ** 

Tampax was perfected by a 
physician who used the prin- 
ciple of internal absorption 
long known to the medical mm 
profession. §^ 



II 



Tampax is made of pure sur- 
gical cotton contained in pat- 
ented throw-away applica- 
tors for easy insertion. Your 
hands need not touch the ti 
Tampax. •• 



AA Tampax is many, many times 
§W smaller than the external 
forms of protection. Further- 
more, it requires no belts, pins «j 
or other supporting devices. ^^ 

** No odor with Tampax. And it 
mm cannot create bulges, ridges 
or edgelines which otherwise 
might "show" through snugly «« 
fitted suits or dresses. ^^ 



II 



II 



Tampax cannot be felt by the 
woman or girl while wearing 
it. And you need not remove 
it while tubbing, showering «» 
or swimming. MM 

Buy Tampax at drug and no- 
tion counters in 3 absorben- 
cies: Regular, Super, Junior. 
A month's supply will go 
right into your purse. Econo- 
my box will last four months 
(average) .... Tampax lacot- MB 
porated. Palmer, Mass. •# 



AUGUST, 1955 



TV 



MU>IO 
MIRROR 



VOL. 44, NO. 3 



7V.F., N.]., Conn. Edition 



Ann Higginbotham, Editor 



Ann Mosher, Executive Editor 
Teresa Buxton, Managing Editor 
Ellen Taussig, Associate Editor 
Claire Safran, Assistant Editor 



Jack Zasorin, Art Director 
Frances Maly, Associate Art Director 
Joan Clarke, Art Assistant 
Bud Goode, West Coast Editor 



people on the air 

What's New from Coast to Coast by Jill Warren 6 

Always in Harmony (The McGuire Sisters) by Martin Cohen 29 

It's on the Record (Martin Block) by Ira H. Knaster 32 

Meet Linda Porter (Gloria Louis) by Alice Francis 34 

New Star in the Sky (Gary Crosby) by Maxine Arnold 36 

Happy, Happy Time (Patti O'Neill) by Lilla Anderson 38 

With a Smile in His Voice (Jack Smith) by Ed Meyerson 42 

The Heart Knows Best (Paul Dixon) by Helen Bolstad 48 

No Time for Love (Eydie Gorme) by Philip Chapman 56 

The Road Of Life (picture story from the beloved dramatic serial).... 58 
Those Whiting Girls! 

(Barbara and Margaret) by Fredda Dudley Balling 62 

Spotlight on Announcers (Ralph Paul, Jack Lescoulie, 

Julia Meade, Rex Marshall) 64 

Most Sincerely Yours (Ted Mack) by Gladys Hall 66 



features in full color 



The Doctor's Wife (short-short story from the popular daytime drama) 44 

The Colmans of Ivy (Ronald and Benita) by Bud Goode 46 

Her Life Is a Song (Betty Clooney) by Frances Kish 50 

A Very Lucky Lady (Flora Campbell) by Mary Temple 52 



your local station 



Laughs Unlimited ( WNEW) 4 

Master Cut-up (WSYR, WSYR-TV) 12 

Girl on the Go (WMOA, WCEF, WPAR) 16 

Doubly Delightful ( WABC-TV) 26 



your special services 



Information Booth 8 

Steve Allen's Turntable H 

New Patterns for You (smart wardrobe suggestions) 14 

Daytime Diary 1" 

New Designs for Living (needlecraft and transfer patterns) 20 

Inside Radio (program listings) 72 

TV Program Highlights 74 

Cover portrait of The McGuire Sisters by Jay Seymour 



»: 



buy your September copy early • on sale August 4 



PUBLISHED moNTHLY by Mactadden Publications, Inc., New 
fxecJtive, advertising and editorial offices at 

??r Fist 42nd street, New Yorlt, N. Y. Editorial Branch 
n«i.n?- -121 South Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, Calif., and 
§?lNirth La Salle Street, Chicago, 111. Irving S. Manheirner. 
D5.r=irt2nt- Lee Andrews, Vice President; Meyer Dworkin. 
Sec?etaS^'and Treasurer. Advertising offices also in Chicago 

SM^RS^SlfrmN^RATES: S3. 00 one year, U. S. and Posses- 
^■"?r ..„,i r'lnida S5 00 per year for all other countries. 

l''ii-as^t^Jf^as-y%"5r-n^■^"J^Sd?|i?"w!le^rx^^SS<^o= 
&s<?R°rPT^s"-^'A.irant'/<rrfpts^ST.ll°/'*caJI^ffy|.-nsidered^ 
E'urp"u%uXT''iafm„t be responsible ' or^^r °o( "thT'^RUE 



is advisable to Iteep a duplicate copy for your records. Only 
those manuscripts accompanied by stamped, self-addressed 
return envelopes or with sufficient return postage will be 

FOREIGN editions handled through Macfadden Publications 
International Corp., 205 East 42nd Street, New York 17, 
N. Y. Irving S. Manheimer, President; Douglas Lockhart, 
Vice President, 

RE-ENTERED as Second Class Matter, June 28, 1954, at the 
Post Office at New York. N. Y., under the Act of March 3, 
1879 Authorized as Second Class mail. P. O. Dept, Ottawa, 
Ont . Canada. Copyright 1955 by Macfadden Publications, Inc. 
All rights reserved under International Copyright Convention. 
All rights reserved under Pan-American Copyright Conven- 
tion Todos derechos reservados segun La Convencion Pan- 
Americana de Propledad Literaria y Artistica. Title ^ademai^ 
registered In U. S. Patent Office. Printed in U. S. A. by Art 
Color Printing Company. 
STORY Women's Group 






And who would blame her? After all, is 
there anything worse than to be stuck 
with a man who has halitosis (unpleas- 
ant breath)? So, this joker is already 
on the way out . . . and he had dreamed 
of this date for weeks. 

How dumb can you he? How dare any- 
one assume that his breath is always 
okay? Halitosis comes and goes . . . 
absent one day, present the next. You 
may be guilty without realizing it. And 
even your best friend won't tell you. 
Men are all-too-common offenders. 

Why risk bad breath needlessly when 
Listerine Antiseptic is such a quick, 
delightful, and efficient precaution 
against it? 

No tooth paste kills odor germs 
like this . . . instantly 

Listerine Antiseptic does for you what 
no tooth paste can possibly do. Listerine 
instantly kills germs ... by millions . . . 
and germ reduction is the answer to 
sweeter breath. 




The most widely used antiseptic in the world. 



You see, far and away the most com- 
mon cause of offensive breath is the 
fermentation, produced by germs, of 
proteins which are always present in 
the mouth. And research shows that your 
breath stays sweeter longer, the more you 
reduce germs in the mouth. 

Listerine clinically proved 
four times better than tooth paste 

No tooth paste, of course, is antiseptic. 
Chlorophyll does not kill germs — but 
Listerine kills them by millions, gives 



you lasting antiseptic protection against 
bad breath. 

Is it any wonder Listerine Antiseptic, 
in recent clinical tests, averaged at least 
four times more effective in stopping 
bad breath odors than the tooth pastes 
it was tested against? 

With proof like this, it's easy to see 
why Listerine belongs in your home. 
Every morning . . . every night . . . 
before every date, make it a habit to 
always gargle Listerine, the most widely 
used antiseptic in the world. 



LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC STOPS BAD BREATH 

4 limes belter Ihan any leelh paste 



laugh Unlinifed 




Gene Klavan and Dee Finch: For two years, these two zanies have delighted listeners with Anything Goes. 



THE WNEW airwaves crackle with hilarity as Gene Klavan and Dee Finch conduct 



KCIPE for merry mayhem: 1 radio, dial set at 1150 — 
Station WNEW — tuned in, with moderate volume, 
Monday through Saturday from 5:30 to 9 A.M. 
Stir in Gene Klavan and Dee Finch, then prepare for 
a round of music and chatter spiced with some of the 
tangiest and most explosive wit to hit any airwaves. 
Aptly called Anything Goes, this recipe-for-fun show 
has long enjoyed a top rating in the New York area. 
Perhaps the greatest reason for Klavan's and Finch's 
success — other than their talents — can be found in their 
opposing natures and backgrounds. Easygoing Dee Finch 
has always approached life with a devil-may-care atti- 
tude and, since boyhood days, has known, and gotten, 
exactly what he wanted. By the time he was ten, Dee 
was broadcasting over Station WNBF in his home town, 
Binghamton, New York. After graduation from high 
school, he became a staff member at WNBF for four 
years, followed by one year at WAGE in Syracuse. Then, 
Dee felt he was ready for the "big time." "Big-time 
deejays and New York's WNEW," he says, "meant the 
same to me, so I figured I'd get my first refusal at the 
top." True to the Finch luck, he was hired — almost on 
the spot — as a staff announcer at WNEW. Four years 
later. Dee was summoned into the Army. Upon his 
discharge, he returned to New York, wondering if he 
still had a job at WNEW. He did and, just a few months 



later, when Jack Lescoulie left the station. Dee took his 
place, co-starring with Gene Raybum, next Gene Klavan, 
. . . Dee's good fortune spills over into his personal life: 
he married Bette, whom he met in junior high school 
and decided then she'd be his wife, and has the family 
he hoped for — Greg, SVa; Virginia, 1 — and a comfortable 
home on Long Island. His main hobby is operating his 
ham radio set. His one big indulgence, he says, is a 
31-foot cabin cruiser. Bette sums up Dee's happy state 
in a nutshell by saying, "Dee goes to work like a lot of 
people go to golf." One of the nicest things about Dee's 
good fortune is that he has never taken it for granted. 
On the other side of the mike is Gene Klavan, whose 
life has been filled with the unexpected, and who — even 
though he's "arrived" — can't stop worrying if he's going 
to stay there. Born in Baltimore, Gene decided to try 
law as a career and was studying at Johns Hopkins 
when the Army requested his services. He became a 
radar engineer in the South Pacific. Once out of the 
service. Gene took a fling at being an assistant editor 
on Coronet Magazine, then resumed his law studies at 
the University of Maryland. Finally, he went to work 
at Station WCBM in Baltimore. "The reason was sim- 
ple," says the complicated Klavan. "I had to make a 
living and was able to talk someone into paying me for 
being a disc jockey." Next, Gene went to WITH, then 



I 



'^'W^^'^WiT4 



Gene's wife Phyllis ond Dee's wife Bette get a 
day off as the two fothers become baby-sitters. 




a daily circus of music, chatter and comedy 



moved to Washington and WTOP — to fill the vacancy 
made by one Arthur Godfrey — and was a tremendous 
success there. Then, one day, after Gene Rayburn had 
left WNEW and Dee Finch was looking for a partner, 
Gene was asked to audition. After that, there was no 
doubt in anyone's minds that Klavan and Finch were 
"meant for each other" — and for WNEW listeners. . . . 
At home in a Cape Cod cottage on Long Island, not far 
from the Finch residence, Gene and his wife Phyllis — 
whom he met while they both were students at Johns 
Hopkins — keep busy with their two children, Ross, 4, 
and Andrew, 1. An amateur shutterbug, Gene has taken 
"thousands" of pictures of his children. When asked to 
describe Gene "at home," Phyllis' reply is, "It depends 
on what minute you're talking about." One minute he's 
happy, the next he's worrying. 

While Finch tends to be the calmer, "straight man" of 
the two, Klavan sallies forth with a madcap approach, 
using the dozens of dialects or "character voices" he has 
mastered. The boys are backed up by a recorded "gim- 
mick" file of 750 different sounds. And, believe it or not, 
Anything Goes is completely unrehearsed. 

Close friends at work and in private Ufe, Gene Klavan 
and Dee Finch provide happy proof that, although they 
may be opposites, they are two of a delightful kind when 
it comes to pleasing WNEW listeners. 




Meal-time problem: How to keep calm while feeding 
Andrew and Ross Klavan, Greg and Virginia Finch. 




Shades of Davy Crockett! Ross "covers" Doddy Gene 
while Greg has a grand time lassoing Daddy Dee. 




Who's having more fun? Finch seems to be holding 
his own, but Klavan tries calling up for reserves. 



WHAT'S NEW FROM 



COAST TO COAST 



• By Jill Warren 




He's a whirly bird: George Gobel takes a helicopter ride 
while in Fort Worth to entertain the Texas Bankers Assn. 





Imogene Coca — with Apri the poodle and Gainser the 
cat — is scheduled to guest star on TV next season. 



Our Miss Brooks: On a visit to New York, Eve Arden gives 
her year-old son Douglas his first lesson in "penmanship." 



SOME interesting fare has been lined up by NBC -TV 
for their "summer specials" — or, as they're 
being called, "spectaculars in slipcovers." On 
July 30, "Svengali and the Blonde" will be presented as 
an hour and a half musical adaptation of George 
de Maurier's classic, Trilhy. Carol Channing will be 
Trilby, Basil Rathbone will be her Svengali, and 
Russell Arms, from Your Hit Parade, will play the 
romance. Ethel Barrymore will narrate the show, 
which will originate in Hollywood, with Alan Handley 
producing and directing. For August 27, NBC-TV 
has planned another super-duper, "One Touch of 
Venus," which will co-star Virginia Mayo and Russell 
Nype, with George Gaines. More details on this 
one next month. 

The Lawrence Welk Show is a brand-new musical 
hour program seen on ABC-TV Saturday nights. The 
show originates in Hollywood, where Lawrence Welk 
and his "Champagne Music" have been a local 
television click for some time. 

CBS Radio has signed another Godfrey — Katherine, 
by name — sister of the red-headed rebel, Arthur. 
She has just started her own radio program, called 
The Kathy Godfrey Show, heard Sunday afternoons for 
twenty-five minutes. Kathy serves as commentator, 
humorous observer and interviewer, and hopes to 
include among her weekly guests important figures in 
the world of entertainment, as well as people who 
make good news. Just for laughs she might invite 
some of the ex-Little (Continued on page 22) 



66 



Pre Waited a Long Time for a Woman Like You! 

-and I don't care if you belong to another man!" 



I 




three 

OF THESE NEW BEST-SELLERS 



BE up to 

M7.25 VALUE 

in Pub. Editions 



for only 



when you join f/ie Dollar Soofc Club and agree le 
(otie as few as 6 se/eefions ouf of fhe 24 to be 
offered within a year 



NOT AS A STRANGER 
Morton Thompson 

Nation's long-run hit ! 
Story of Lucas Marsh, 
who gave everything to 
become a doctor ; Kris- 
tina, the girl he so 
strangely married ; and 
the beautiful woman 
who shook his innermost 
soul ! 700 exciting pages. 
Pub. ed. $4.75 






LOVELY Jane Hoyt had come 
I 6000 miles in search of her 
missing husband. She had search- 
ed eveiywhere — in Hong Kong's 
hotels, bars, waterfront dives. But 
each lead only pointed to Hank 
Lee, the notorious American ad- 
f venturer, who was supposed to 
' know everybody. 

So she had gone to his mansion 
in the hills, and he had agreed 
to help her. Many times she was 
to return there . . . too many times! 
Why.' Was it because of Hank's 
promise to find her husband, or 
for a new reason — a reason filled 
with confusion . . . and torment.' 

"I love you, Jane," Hank had 
whispered as his strong arms 
held her, "aad though I'll get 
your husband back— you'll have 
to choose between him and me!" 

Soldier of Fortune is the dar- 
ing new smash-hit romance by 
the author of The High and the 
hiighty. It costs $3.50 in the pub- 
lisher's edition, but you may 
choose it in this amazing 3-books- 
for-$l offer to new members! 



OUTLINE OF HISTORY-H. G. Wells 

New enlarged 2-volume edition, 
1,312 pages. The whole dramatic 
story of mankind from the earliest 
times to our own years. 200 illus- 
trations. One of the most acclaimed 
works of the century. Originally 
published in one volume at $5.00 

This 2-voliime set counts 

as one book 






LOVE IS ETERNAL 
Irving Stone 

No. 1 hit for many 
months I The love story 
of Mary Todd, daughter 
of society, who mar- 
ried the one man con- 
sidered most unsuitable 
for her — Abe Lincoln I 
448 pages. Pub. $}.95 



THORNOIKE-BARNHART 
DICTIONARY 

1955 edition! 80,000 
entries, 700 pictures, 
10,000 explanatory 
phrases, 5,000 synonyms 
and antonyms, hundreds 
of notes on correct us- 
age, word origins, etc. 
896 pages. Pub. S2.95 









GONE WITH THE WIND 
Margaret Mitchell 

Greatest best-seller of 
the century in a new 
edition. The love story 
of Scarlett O'Hara and 
Rhett Butler against a 
spectacular historical 
background. Pub. $2.95 

HAMMOND-DOUBLEDAY 
WORLD ATLAS 

9%" by 121/4" volume. 
Covers U. S., Canada, 
all foreign countries. 
90 maps, }2 full-page, 
full-color! 154 photos 
plus 94 pages of faas 
on the world's peoples. 
Book club ed. $3.50 




BENTON'S ROW 
Frank Yerby 

From the day outlaw 
Tom Benton meets 
honey-blond Sarah 
Tyler in the doorway 
or a lonely cabin, this 
roaring new tale of 
love and violence in 
the Louisiana bayous 
sweeps along in top 
Yerby style! Pub. 
edition $3.50 



AROUND THE WORLD 
IN 1,000 PICTURES 

Visit strange ports and 
enchanting cities, Rome, 
Paris, Bali, Hong Kong, 
and many more ! See all 
the wonders of 83 fabu- 
lous lands in 1,000 pho- 
tos with exciting text. 
Pub. orig. ed. $7.50 



AN OPPORTUNITY YOU MUSTN'T MISS! | 

'—"■^'^'•■^ -,,..■,•_ gu ^j special Club prices which save 

you up to 75%! But you take only the 
books you want — and you do not have 
to take one every month. You may take 
as few as six selections a year! 



CHOOSE any 3 books on this page for 
only SI when you join the Dollar 
Book Club. This big introductory offer 
is made to demonstrate the wonderful 
values you enjoy as a member. 

Save up to 75% on New Books 

(compared wiffi prices of pub. editions) 
Imagine — the same new^ books costing 
up to S3.95 in publishers' editions come 
to Club members for only SI each! The 
biggest hits by top authors like Frank 
Yerby, Daphne du Maurier, Thomas B. 
Costain, A. J. Cronin and many others, 
have come to members at this low $1 
price. Occasionally, extra-value selec- 
tions at $1.49 are offered. All are new, 
full-size, hard-bound books. 

In addition, the Club frequently of- 
fers other very desirable books . . . use- 
ful homemaker volumes. . .beautiful de- 
luxe books, books of cultural value . . . 



Mail Coupon— Send No Money 

Receive any 3 books you choose from 
this page for only $1, plus a small ship- 
ping charge. Two books are your gift 
for joining, and one is your first selec- 
tion. Thereafter, you will receive regu- 
larly the Club's Bulletin, which de- 
scribes the forthcoming selections and 
other book bargains for members only. 
If not delighted with your introduc- 
tory Three-Book bargain package — re- 
turn all books and membership will be 
cancelled. Mail coupon now. Doubleday 
Dollar Book Club, Garden City, N. Y. 



MAIL THIS COUPON 

Doubleday Dollar Book Club, Dept. 18TSG, Garden City, New York 
Please enroll me as a Dollar Book Club member. Send me at 
once as my gift books and first selection the 3 books checked 
below— and bill me ONLY $1 FOR ALL 3, plus a small ship- 
ping charge. 
O Around the World D Hammond-DoubledayD Outline of History (set) 

in 1,000 Pictures World Atlas Q Soldier of Fortune 

D Benton's Row D Love Is Eternal □ Thorndike-Barnhart 

D Gone Witti the WindQ Not As A Stranger Dictionary 

Also send my first issue of The Bulletin, telling me about the 
new forthcoming one-dollar book selections and other bargains 
for members. I may notify you in advance if I do not wish the 
following month's selections. I do not have to accept a book 
every month — only six a year. I pay nothing except $1 for each 
selection I accept, plus a small shipping charge (unless I choose 
an extra-value selection). 

NO-RISK GUARANTEE: If not delighted return all 
books in 7 days and membership will be cancelled. 

Mr. 

Mrc Please 

m[S •■""» 

Address 

City 

& Zone State 

In Canada, selection price $1.10 plus shipping; address Doubleday 
Book Club, 105 Bond St., Toronto 2. Offer good in U. S. & Canada only. 



information booth 



Crew-Cut Comedy 

Would you give me some information on 
Gene Rayburn, the announcer on NBC- 
TV's Tonight? 

B.L.S., North Truro, Mass. 

Gene Rayburn, Tonight's six-foot-one 
announcer and buffoon, was bitten by the 
theatrical bug while still in grammar 
school in Chicago. As he recalls, "I was 
bitten so hard that when I first went on 
stage I couldn't say my lines." When Gene 
got his voice back, he was cast as George 
Washington, but in place of the scheduled 
stirring speech, he began "Lizzie Borden 
took an ax, gave her mother forty whacks." 
. . . After graduation from Knox College, 
in Galesburg, Illinois, Gene pounded the 
New York pavements, finally landed a job 
as a page boy and enrolled in announcers' 
school. He worked for Station WGNY in 
the Hudson Valley, then for stations in 
Baltimore and Philadelphia. In 1942, he 
joined Station WNEW in New York, then 
left for three years in the Air Force where 
he claims he made the world's distance 
record for holding the rank of second lieu- 
tenant. Back at WNEW, after the war, he 
did a morning radio show with Jack Les- 
coulie, then formed the hilarious team of 
Rayburn and Finch, which entertained 
New Yorkers for six years and, for a short 
while, had the whole country laughing with 
their night-time network show. When the 
team disbanded in 1952, Gene went on to 
star on several of his own shows and to 
appear also on The Name's The Same, be- 
fore taking his stand on Tonight. . . . Gene 
is married to Helen Tichnor, a model who 
has been a personality in her own right on 
a number of Gene's shows. They live in a 
Dutch colonial home in suburban Mamar- 
oneck, New York, and have a twelve-year- 




Bea Benaderet 



old daughter, Lynn. Gene still likes to fly, 
spends his vacations on Nantucket. Re- 
membering his own early hard-times, he 
has established a scholarship at Columbia 
University for career-minded page boys. 

Mystery Lady 

With the closing of Jimmy Durante' s TV 
program, he always says, "Good night, 
Mrs. Calabash, wherever you are!" Can 
you tell me who she is? 

A.B., Coopers Mills, Me. 

Sorry, but Jimmy isn't telling about who 
Mrs. Calabash is. His answer to all ques- 
tions about her is to grin and say : "Every- 
body is entitled to his secrets. This is 



maid of all work," she recalls. She tried 
Hollywood and network radio in 1936, got 
her first big breaks with Orson Welles and 
Jack Benny. 

A Good Start 

Would you tell us a little about Kort 
Falkenberg, who plays Ma Perkins' son 
Joe in the CBS Radio serial? 

H.B., Niagara Falls, N. Y. 

Now that he's established as Joe Perk- 
ins, Kort Falkenberg claims that his act- 
ing career was launched during his first 
year of school, when his classmates ap- 
plauded his debut as a song-and-dance 
man. But he was a senior in high school 
before he decided to capitalize on his dra- 
matic talent. Meanwhile, he had learned 
photography at his father's studio, won 
awards for his work in fabric design and 
been active in a local church drama club. 
A few years were filled with summer stock, 
and off-Broadway experimental produc- 
tions. To add to his meager stage earnings, 
Kort worked as a stock-exchange clerk, an 
usher, a mailman and a museum lecturer, 
and continued to study on a scholarship at 
the New School of Social Research. Then 
Uncle Sam made him an Entertainment 
Specialist, giving him a chance to do a 
national radio show every week before 
shipping him to the Pacific to organize, 
direct and perform in GI productions. 
When he was discharged, Kort enrolled in 
the American Theater Wing Professional 
Training Program. Soon his age and 
dialect characterizations began to be heard 
on such shows as Gangbusters, Crime 
Photographer and City Hospital. Kort 
is married to Gerry Lock, an actress. They 
have a two-and-a-half-year-old son and 
live in Manhattan. {Continued on page 10) 




Gene Rayburn 



Next-Door Neighbor 

Would you tell me something about the 
woman who plays Blanche Morton, 
Grade's neighbor on CBS-TV's Burns And 
Allen Show? D.F., Birmingham, Ala. 

Grade's feminine foil is played by Bea 
Benaderet, who had her first fling at tele- 
vision on the Burns And Allen Show. But 
her long-time radio career on such shows 
as My Friend Irma, Adventures Of Ozzie 
And Harriet, The Great Gildersleeve and 
Fibber McGee And Molly has made her 
voice familiar to most Americans. . . . Born 
in New York of Spanish-Irish ancestry, 
Bea studied voice and piano from the time 
she was knee-high to a piano bench. She 
participated in school dramatics, then 
studied at the Reginald Travis School of 
Acting. Next came stock companies, little- 
theater work and her first radio job at San 
Francisco's KFRC as actress, singer, 
writer, producer, announcer — "really a 




Kort Falkenberg 



cyip^" 



W 0^ V^^-^ ^^ u3ctL-f/ie/^ 





WONDERFUL NEW EASIT-TO-DO PIN-CURL PERMANENT 



NEW ! rc>^ toclcujfe /o^-tM. VodK itlfte-. . . 

NEW ! jJo- oM-iMmA. octiyt! 

NEW ! Ej^c^u>^ l^iu^ >4tL(k u^ ei^ 



^ 



In hairdos, today's look is the soft look, and Procter & Gamble's 
wonderful new pin-curl home permanent is especially designed to 
give it to you. A PIN-IT wave is soft and lovely as a pin-curl set, 
never tight and kinky. PIN-IT is so wonderfully different. You can 
tell the minute you open the bottle. It contains absolutely no 
ammonia. It's easy on your hair, too, so you can use it more often. 
And PIN-IT is far easier to use. Just put your hair up in pin curls 
and apply PIN-IT'S Waving Lotion. Later, rinse and let dry. With 
self-neutralizing PIN-IT, no resetting is needed. You get a perma- 
nent and a set in one step. For a wave that looks soft and lovely 
from the very first day and lasts weeks and weeks— try PIN-IT! 






BY PROCTER fr GAMBLE -(cVL~tkt. CuaJL Of LjOWU dAeJXWJ^ 




MiMiMMuyfHIIIMiMaMaMHI 



nuny 



Ji955 f » e 



Md -fiVL iir IM- -tke cjm.OJ^ OfM:r^^O^ ]p(xxkjxq^ 



""""^^■^^■n 




When invited to a formal tea, should you — 

n Be punctual Q Go formal Q Talk about people 



Sooner or later comes the bid to your first 
formal tea. Must you dress formally ? Stay 
the full two hours? What should you say to 
the V.I.P.s you meet? Answers: Wear your 
best daytime outfit. Arrive and leave when 
you like. As for the Very Important People: 



a word from you about their interests and 
your what-to-say worries are phf-f-ft! No 
problems ! That goes for calendar worries, as 
well — with Kotex* to keep you comfortable. 
For Kotex gives softness that holds its shape. 
Doesn't chafe ! Made to stay soft! 





Do you think the lady in the 
limelight is — 

I I Devastating Q Obnoxious Q Dramatics coach 

Her captive audience — they'' ve had it! But 
Cora the Cube "must" act out the merest 
trivia she tells. Overworked gestures mar 
your word power, your poise. Practice de- 
scribing a spiral, a dance step, a circle with- 
out demonstration. Poise on "those" days, 
too, is a matter of being self-confident. So, 
you choose Kotex — assured no revealing 
outlines show, thanks to flat pressed ends. 



Which gives your sports outfit a new 
"ladylike" look? 

I I Bermuda shorts Q Bermuda skirt Q Ruffles 

If you like shorts, but find they </e-flatter 
your figure — the Bermuda walking skirt is 
for you. It's the feminine, flattering version 
of Bermuda shorts: but newer, smarter ! 
On certain days, why not be smart about get- 
ting the right-for-you size of Kotex? Try 
all 3: Regular, Junior, Super; each gives the 
complete absorbency you need. See wliich 
suits you exactly. 



More women choose KOTEX than all other sanitary napkins 



Have yoo tried new Delsey ? It's the 2 -ply toilet 
tissue with Kleenex* softness. Only Delsey is clean-cut 
to tear evenly. It ends waste — saves money — because 
it can't shred like ordinary toilet tissues. And Delsey* 
com<!s in your favorite towel colors: pink, yellow, blue 
and fircen, as well as white. Be thrifty — buy quality — 
buy Delsey. 





information booth 

{Continued from page 8) 




Steve Gethers 



'T. M. RES. U. S. PAT, OFF. 



10 



Actor-Author 



/ would like to know something about 
Steve Gethers, who is Hal Craig in Love 
Of Life on CBS-TV. E.P., Monessen, Pa. 

Handsome Steve Gethers can work both 
sides of a script. As a player, he's night- 
club operator Hal Craig in Love Of Life. 
As a playwright, he's been represented on 
TV with "Baseball Blues" on U. S. Steel 
Hour and "Departure" on Kraft. . . . The 
versatile Mr. Gethers was born June 8, 
1922, studied at the University of Iowa 
and the American Academy of Dramatic 
Arts. He toured the country in "Joan of 
Lorraine," with Sylvia Sydney, and in 
"Open House." During the war, he served 
with the field artillery in the Pacific. Steve 
has eight years of radio work behind him 
and has been seen on such dramatic TV 
programs as Lux TV Theater, Robert 
Montgomery Presents and Suspense. He 
lives in Manhattan with his wife Julia and 
sons Eric, 8, and Peter, 2. 

Calling All Fans 

The following clubs invite new members. 
If you are interested in joining, write to 
the address given — not TV Radio Mirror. 

Peggy King Fan Club, c/o Pat Brust, 
319 Good St., Jeannette, Pa. 

John Cameron Swayze Fan Club, c/o 
Pearl Weber, P. 0. Box 85. Hurley, N.Y. 

]oan Alexander Fan Club, c/o Hal How- 
ard, 5303 Wriley Rd., Westhaven, Md. 

Marion Marlowe Fan Club, c/o Helen 
D'Avolio, P. 0. Box 107, East Boston, Mass. 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION— If there's 

something you want to know about radio 
and television, write to Information Booth, 
TV Radio Mirror, 205 East 42nd St., New 
York 17, N. Y. We'll answer, if we can, 
provided your question is of general inter- 
est. Answers will appear in this column — 
but be sure to attach this box to your 
letter, and specify whether your question 
concerns radio or TV. 




STEVE ALLEN'S 
TURNTABLE 



H 



I ERE I am in Hollywood, the land of 
sunshine and movie stars, and I must say 
it's fun to be "home" again, back where 
I started. We're just beginning production 
on "The Benny Goodman Story," but I 
brought my trusty turntable along. We've 
got everything from bounce to ballad this 
month, so let's lend an ear. 

Gary Crosby's baritone seems to get bet- 
ter with each new record he makes. He 
sings right out on his latest, "Ayuh, Ayuh," 
a jump novelty which he introduced on 
Ed Sullivan's Toast Of The Town TV 
show. Gary backs it up with the swingy 
"Mississippi Pecan Pie." Buddy Bregman's 
orchestra and The Cheer Leaders vocal 
group supply the backgrounds. (Decca) 

Leave it to Jackie Gleason to do the un- 
usual, espyeciaUy with his recordings. Now 
he has come up with an album called 
"Lonesome Echo," an instrumental set of 
sixteen great old tunes, such things as 
"There Must Be a Way," "Deep Purple," 
"Come Rain or Come Shine," "Speak 
Low," and "Dancing on the Ceiling." The 
orchestrations are the most unusual, and 
feature cellos, guitars, marimbas, and 
twenty — count 'em — twenty mandolins! It 
all adds up to a terrific sound and a ter- 
rific album. Salvador Dali, the famous sur- 
realist artist, did the colorful cover, and 
you'll have to admit that Dali and Glea- 
son are some combination! (Capitol) 

Decca has waxed the whole score of the 
new Broadway musical, "Seventh Heaven," 
with the original cast, which co-stars 
Gloria DeHaven and Ricardo Montal- 
ban, and they've also etched several single 
records of the top tunes from the show. 
Gloria has a platter of "If It's a Dream," 
and "Where Is That Someone for Me?," 
both pretty ballads. Kitty Kallen has also 
done "If It's a Dream," coupled with an- 
other ballad, not from the show, "Forgive 
Me." "Blessings" is done by Marian Ca- 
ruso, Decca's young Philadelphia discov- 
ery, and Sanrniy Davis, Jr. croons " A Man 
with a Dream." 

Eydie Gorme and Steve Lawrence, the 
vocal kids on my Tonight TV show, have 
done up a cute duet called "Knickerbocker 
Mambo," inspired by our lager sponsor, 
"Old Father Knickerbocker." It's a cute 
time, with kind of a crazy, mixed -up lyric. 
On the backing, Eydie solos on a lovely 
ballad, "Give a Fool a Chance." Dick 
Jacobs' orchestra on both. (Coral) 

Davy Crockett is still with us, and a fine 
lad he is. "Be Sure You're Right" (Davy's 
motto) has been recorded by Burl Ives, 
and the song lends itself well to Burl's fa- 
miliar folk style. On the reverse Burl sings 
all about "Old Betsy" (Davy Crockett's 
gun). The Ray Charles male chorus helps 
out with the lyrics. (Decca) 

"Old Betsy" gets the Steve Allen treat- 
ment, too. But we lost our mind on the 
other side with something called "The Goo 



Goo Song," and the idea for this one came 
from those little Goo Goo dolls you may 
have seen on my TV show. We had a lot 
of fun recording the thing, especially with 
the sound effects of the Goo Goo squeak, 
etc. Dick Jacobs conducted the orchestra 
and chorus. (Coral) 

Billy Eckstine comes forward with two 
new ballads, and does a terrific job on 
both. On the first, "Careless Lips," he gives 
out with the sultry treatment in tango 
tempo, with vocal assistance by The Pied 
Pipers. The second is "A Man Doesn't 
Know," one of the loveliest songs from the 
Broadway musical, "Damn Yankees." Lou 
Bring's orchestra. (M-G-M) 

"The Best of Fred Astaire" is the title 
of a new album by the famous song-and- 
dance man. The album has twelve sides, all 
re-issues of the tunes and numbers asso- 
ciated with Astaire during his long movie 
career. Included are such remembered 
songs as "Cheek to Cheek," "A Fine Ro- 
mance," and "Dig It," and Fred tap-dances 
on some of the sides. This album will be a 
must for Astaire fans. (Epic) 

Movie star Jeff Chandler made his debut 
on records a few months ago, and now he 
has added songwriting to his accomplish- 
ments. Jeff wrote a ballad, "Fox Fire"— 
which, incidentally, is the title of his new 
Universal- International picture — and he 
has chosen the tune, natch, for his latest 
release. "Shanermaidel" — which means 
"beautiful girl" in Yiddish — also receives 
the Chandler ballad delivery, with the help 
of The Rhythmaires vocal group. Sonny 
Burke conducts both sides. Nice goin', Jeff. 
(Coral) 

Ray Anthony has a fine new instru- 
mental record, "Mmmm Mamie" and 
"Learnin' the Blues." "Mamie" is an An- 
thony composition, in honor of Ray's 
movie starlet pal, Mamie Van Doren. There 
are tip-top Anthony trumpet solos on both, 
especially on the "Blues" side. This record 
is good for dancing — or just plain listening, 
as you wish. (Capitol) 

"Pete Kelly's Blues" — with a narrative 
by Jack Webb — is the name of a new al- 
bum put together by the Dragnet boy. It's a 
collection of standards played by a small 
jazz band, done up in the style of the 
Roaring Twenties. You'll hear such oldies 
as "Breezing Along with the Breeze," 
"Somebody Loves Me," "Bye, Bye Black- 
bird," "Sugar," and "What Can I say. Dear, 
After I Say I'm Sorry?" and others. Webb 
introduces the tunes, with some short pat- 
ter about each. "Pete Kelly's Blues," in- 
cidentally, is also the title of Jack's forth- 
coming movie for Warner Brothers, and 
many of the album tunes are also in the 
picture. (Victor) 

Julius La Rosa has recorded a new Ital- 
ian rhythm novelty, "Mama Rosa," which 
could ring the bell for him the way "Eh 
Cimipari" did. Julie sings part of the side 



in Italian, and there's also a friscalettu solo 
for good measure. That's Italian for piccolo, 
they tell me. On the backing the La Rosa 
baritone is heard on a pretty ballad, 
"Domani" — which means tomorrow — and 
it's all in English. Accompaniment is by 
Archie Bleyer's orchestra. (Cadence) 

Sister teams have really come into their 
own this past year, and now look — my wife 
and my sister-in-law have joined the pa- 
rade. Jayne and Audrey Meadows have 
cut their first record together, hooray, 
hooray. The gals sing out in gay style on 
a couple of new novelties, "Hot Potato 
Mambo" and "Japanese Rhumba," with 
Hugo Winterhalter's orchestra on the Vic- 
tor label. Now I won't be in trouble with 
the family for not mentioning their wax 
debut! (All kidding aside, it's a cute rec- 
ord.) 

The Cowboy Church Sunday School 
has recorded two semi- religious songs, 
"Go On By" and "The Little Black Sheep," 
both written by Stuart Hamblen. The chil- 
dren's chorus, well-known in California, 
uses only an organ accompaniment. Their 
first record of "Open up Your Heart" sold 
almost a million copies, and this, their sec- 
ond release, may do just as well. (Coral) 

The "X" Label has signed a new instru- 
mental group. The Back Bay Boys, and an 
amusing group they are. For their first 
two sides the lads play — and look out for 
these titles — "Rondo Chi Wutsi" and "Yogi 
Amo." The end result is sort of a cross 
between barrelhouse and razz-a-ma-tazz. 

Well, that about wraps it up for now, but 
I'll be coming at you from Hollywood 
again next month. See you then. 




The Benny Goodman Story: The master 
and myself "on a toot" for my film role. 



11 




Dynamic Jim DeLine daily leads his "Gang" 
through three merry shows which keep WSYR 
listeners and viewers asking for "More!'* 



Master 
Cut-up 




Comedian Nancy Walker, guest "fiddler," amuses some of the DeLine 
Sang: Ken Drumm, Norman Coleman, Carl Mono, Jim and Myron Levee. 



WITH a twinkle in his eye and an ear-to-ear grin, 
Jim DeLine provides Syracuse's Station WSYR 
audiences with some of the best fun and music to be 
found anywhere in the Lake Ontario region. Starting 
at 9: 15 A.M. daily, the Jim DeLine Gang breezes 
through a fun-filled hour on WSYR Radio. Next, the 
Gang hops over to WSYR-TV studios to present their 
noontime show. At 12:45, they all race back to the 
radio studio for their third merry show of the day at 
1 P.M. . . A typical DeLine show — if any can be called 
typical — finds Jim kidding with members of the band 




12 



The DeLine family (minus Jim, Jr. and Linda): Jim and 
Geri with Dickie and Charles, who is called "Chipper." 



or with vocalists Patti Hammond, Dick Workman and 
Fran Walsh. Interspersed with the songs and witty 
bantering, are interviews with guest stars. Jim's favor- 
ite guest is Pat O'Brien, "the only man the Gang hasn't 
been able to talk down!" Himself a master ad-libber, 
Jim has coached the other show members in delivering 
fast comebacks. The results have always met with 
unanimous audience approval. . . . No "Jimmy-come- 
lately" to the entertainment field, the dynamic DeLine 
gained his initial radio experience as a student at Syra- 
cuse University. After graduation, Jim says his first 
attempts to break into radio were "completely unsuc- 
cessful. I made many auditions — but never made the 
grade." Finally, however, he did get a job at WMBO in 
Auburn. Four months later, he had moved to WFBL 
in Syracuse, where the original DeLine Gang was born. 
Then, in 1951, the whole Gang moved to WSYR where 
they have been making merry ever since. ... "I love 
the show and my work," says Jim, recalling that, 
through his work, he met his wife Geri. This occurred 
when Jim was conducting an interview show at a 
Syracuse restaurant where Geri was a hostess. A very 
successful marriage resulted, and today the DeLines' 
new split-level home in Bellewood houses four vigor- 
ous offspring: Jim, Jr., 13; Linda, 8; Charles, 5; and 
Dickie, 1. An avid, in-the-90's golfer, Jim also likes 
to fish, but never does too well. His children, Jim says, 
"have mixed emotions about my work. However, I 
have overheard them brag that their dad has the best 
show on the air. I try never to correct them on this 
point!" . . . Jim receives much mail from his audience — 
which extends into Canada — praising him for his "clean, 
wholesome program, ideal for children and adults." 
And they all agree that the humor and good fellow- 
ship which typifies the Jim DeLine Gang is the per- 
fect daily dose to happily "cur© whatever ails you." 



-I 



NOW! SOFT, GLOWING 
HAIR IN 20 SECONDS! 



''Liven-up" your hair with this 
Amazing Non-oily Hairdressing! 

Now it's so easy to have soft, perfectly -groomed, glow- 
ing hair . . . instantly . . . always! Just a few drops of 
miraculous new suave daily makes hair obey, tames 
wispy ends, stubborn strands. Yet leaves it soft, natural 
looking . . . adds satiny glow, not oily shine . . . reheves 
and prevents dryness and brittleness. Get New Improved 
SUAVE, with Helena Curtis' amazing new "beauty find" 
—greaseless lanolin ! 





GIVES HAIR 

HEALTHY-LOOKING 

GLOW-NOT OILY SHINE! 

SUAVE makes hair sparkly as 
it should be— twinkling with 
new highhghts! No oily look — 
ever! And never any oily feel. 



HAIR DRY, BRITTLE, 

ABUSED? NOTHING 

WORKS LIKE SUAVE! 

SUAVE solves hair woes — 
brings back softness, luster 
to dry, parched, frizzy hair 
instantly. Protects your hair! 




MAKES ANY HAIR STYLE EASY TO ARRANGE! 
PROTECTS ITS CHARM! 

No matter which of the new summer hair styles you choose 
— artfully casual yet neat . . . formal "sculptured" hairdo 
... or the new "loose classic" styles— suave makes your 
hair eager to form into the hairdo you want . : . happy to 
shape into deep rippling waves. 




EVEN AFTER HOURS IN THE SUN- 
KEEP YOUR HAIR SILKEN, SUN-SAFE! 

You don't have to let the sun dry or parch the 
natural beauty of your hair. Just a few magic 
drops of suave daily not only protects your hair 
— it actually recaptures lost sun-damaged beauty! 
Relieves frizz and dryness. Keeps hair soft, silken 
—radiant as the sun itself! Get suave today! 




HELENE CURTIS 

uave 



HAIRDRESSING 



& CONDITIONER 



59<? <=-^l 



(plus taxi 



*trodemark 



NEW! With amazing greaseless lanolin 



T 
V 
R 

13 



m^S"^^^^ 





Only Mavis keeps 
you flower-fragrant, 
flower-fresh, alluringly 
feminine oil over. This 
velvety imported talc, 
exquisitely perfumed, 
insures your daintiness 
. . , absorbs moisture, 
helps prevent chafing. 
With Mavis you ore 
always your loveliest 
self ... In 29i-4M 
and 59* sizes at all 
toiletry counters. 



mm 



TALCUM 



14 




PERFUME • LIPSTICK at all 10^2 stores 



Neiv Patterns 
for You 




9249 SIZES ^AV2-2AV2 



9238 — Easy to sew — jiffy to iron. 
This is the dress you'll reach for most 
often. Misses' Sizes 12-20; 30-42. Size 16 
takes 4 yards 35-inch fabric. SS^- 

9066 — Half-sizers: Three ways you can 
wear this style — as apron, sport 
jerkin, or terrycloth beachcoat. Cut to 
fit the shorter, fuller figure. Half Sizes 
141/2-241/2. Size I6I/2 takes 21/b yards 
35-inch fabric. 35c 

9249 — Designed to slenderize — 
the paneled hipline makes you look 
inches slimmer. Half Sizes 14V^-24i/4. 
Size 161/2 takes 4% yards 39-inch 
fabric. 35<;- 



Send ihirly-five cents (in coins) for each pattern to: 
TV Radio Mirror, Pattern Department, P. O. Box 
137, Old Chelsea Station, New York 11, N. Y. Add 
five cents for each pattern for first-class mailing. 



NOW 



iHme^l^^/ 



ALL DAY L0N6...F0R EVERY SUMMER ACTIVITY 




NEW PLAYTEX 




BRA 



At last, a bra so beautifully designed that it gives 
heavenly comfort and a g loriousl y youthful look to all sizes ... A to D cups/ 




1953 International Latex Corp'n. . . . PLAYTEX PARK . . . Dover Del * In Canada: Playtex Ltd. . . . PLAYTEX PARK . . . Arnprior, Ont. su.s.A. and foreign patents pending 



T 
V 
R 

15 




Girl on the Go 



Each day is a challenge and 

an inspiration for Paula Carr and 

her Ohio- West Virginia friends 




Paula interviews radio veteran Sandy Suyer of WMOA 



NEW York doesn't have all the commuters," grins 
Paula Marie Carr, who conducts five programs 
on three different stations. She's thinking of the 
time the tape recordings for her Marietta, Ohio, 
programs were accidentally thrown away and she 
had to rise at dawn, race to Marietta to remake 
them, then speed back to Parkersburg, West Vir- 
ginia, in time for a nine o'clock broadcast. "My 
schedule," she says, "is every bit as hectic as the 
one I used to have in Manhattan, where the cabs 
used to wait at the studio door to get me across town 
to another one — except that I'm now my own cab 
driver!" . . . Paula's current weekday schedule in- 



T 
V 
R 

16 




Coffee with her dad, a teacher, and nnom, a dramatic read- 
er, is o welconne break. Both always backed Paula's career. 



eludes Meet Me At Millie's, on Station WCEF at 
9 A.M.; Just Between Us, on Station WMOA at 
9:30 A.M.; Over The Back Fence, Station WCEF at 
10:30 A.M.; Five Till Noon, Station WPAR at 11:55 
A.M.; and From The Scraphook, Station WCEF at 
3: 45 P.M. . . . Always poised and good-humored, 
Paula can laugh even about the time, last March, 
when the Ohio River went on the rampage, flooding 
her hotel-basement studio in Marietta. The flood 
chased the station up to the second floor, but by 
the time all the equipment had been installed in 
the temporary broadcasting quarters, there was no 
room for Paula. Her program came from out in the 
hallway. "I thought I'd have to do that one by 
boat," she recalls. . . . Born in McConnelsville, Ohio, 
Paula has lived with her family in the same little 
white house in Parkersburg since she was six years 
old. As a child, she produced plays in the family 
garage, but, at Parkersburg High School and Ma- 
rietta College, she intended acting as a hobby, teach- 
ing as a career. Then two school vacations in 
summer stock changed her mind and, after gradua- 
tion, Paula went to work for Station WPAR. . . . 
Although all her present programs — except Just 
Between Us — are done "live," Paula still finds time 
to act as president and executive director of the 
Wood County United Cerebral Palsy Fund. She 
relaxes by collecting poems and inspirational bits 
for her fourteen scrapbooks. "If there were ever a 
fire," Paula laughs, "I'd save the scrapbooks first." 
When there's time, she also enjoys riding and golf. 
. . . Every day, to PaUla, is a happy one, "just living 
and having my friends, my listeners and my family. 
I'm a very lucky person." And, she adds, "Each day 
is a challenge and an inspiration. That's not very 
dramatic, I know, but it's the way I feel." Letters 
and phone calls from her many listeners in Ohio 
and West Virginia — and four little Parkersburg girls 
named after her — clearly show how everyone feels 
about talented and personable Paula Carr. 



Wonderful New Super-Lather* Shampoo! 



OUT-SHINES OTHER SHAMPOOS, 
SHOWS HAIR'S HIDDEN BEAUTY 




Highlights Are "Love-Lights"! Poise, charm— and 
romance — belong to the woman whose hair shimmers with 
dancing highlights. And how can you have this sparkle on 
every date? By using amazing new double-rich Helene Curtis 
Lanolin Lotion Shampoo! Try it and see! 



"Lanolin-Lively" Foam . . • 

Oceans Of It Leaves Hair 

Gleaming, Obedient, Lovely! 



Only the genius of Helene Curtis covild produce such an 
amazing shampoo as Lanolin Lotion ... a shampoo that 
brings such glimmering, shimmering radiance to your hair! 
The secret lies in the lanolin-rich lather of Lanolin 
Lotion Shampoo. You've never seen such oceans of rich, 
velvety suds . . . suds which are actually twice as rich 

in lanolin! 

this does 



PROOF IT OUT-LATHERS 
OTHER BRANDS 




Helene Curtis Lanolin Lotion 

Shampoo out-lathers four other brands 

given the Cylinder-Foam test. 




Leave It To The Ladies ... At parties, club meetings, over the fence . . . the word 
gets around: "Something new and wonderful is here!" Especially when it "does things" for 
your hair, the news spreads fast. So it's no wonder thousands are switching to "out-shining" 
Helene Curtis Lanolin Lotion Shampoo! 



And what this does to 
your hair is amazing to see! 
Suddenly any hair— even 
problem hair that's had its 
beauty oils dried or bleached 
away —captures new beauty, 
new polish, and a new man- 
ageability that makes your 
waves ripple into place. 

Try Helene Curtis Lanolin 
Lotion Shampoo for a revela- 
tion in hair beauty! 




Get Helene Curtis 
Lanolin Lotion Shampoo 
Today! You'll fin.d that 
never before has your hair had 
so much softness, so much 
beauty! 29ff, 59jii or $1. 



17 



ASK YOUR 

DOCTOR or DRUGGIST 




END THAT 

"Certain Time" 
Odor Problem 



\> 



rr 



ENIVDS 

Tablets containing Darotol® 

that absorbs odors witiiin 

the body-before they start I 

lization have sought to cover it 
turipT' ^"^e^er-after many cen- 

sttc^e^Ltot^oY i°f ?- sTb- 
ess°ences'^r,%°f ^'^^ T^* P^^ent 

through theli*estivi°ys'tem'!t^ 
-wherelfr^ "" P-^-^ ofTh^body 

pS-a„rst;et°et^',,^,"Letf 

Trial size only 49?'?ir^°"»t«'-«- 
even^ore eclot'icai.'':?|;^-|.? 
are also available in Canada 

Problem of Odor OfflnL'w '"^," ^ 
in plain envelope) write ''E^MTrli^J^ 

City i, New York! °"^ ^'^^"^ 



Daytime Diary 



^Z/ programs are heard Monday through Friday; consult 
local papers for time and station. 



^•-o. 



'•■t 



BACKSTAGE WIPE Mary Noble, wife 
of actor Larry Noble, is almost happy over 
the trouble actress Elise Shephard is caus- 
ing for Larry. In an effort to make Larry 
increasingly dependent on her, Elise is 
undermining his self-confidence to the 
point where his career is in danger — and 
this means that he must turn to Mary for 
help and strength as he used to do before 
Elise came into their lives. Will this re- 
new their love? NBC Radio. 

THE BRIGHTER BAV On the surface, 
Don Harrick is a talented architect hired 
to plan the new Youth Center, and Lydia 
is his charming, devoted sister-in-law. But 
Reverend Dennis suspects the emotional 
strain underlying this relationship. Will he 
be able to help Lydia free herself from the 
bondage into which Don's selfishness has 
tied her ever since her husband's death? 
What happens when editor Max Canfield 
becomes important to her? CBS-TV and 
CBS Radio. 

CONCERNING MISS MARLOWE 

When actress Maggie Marlowe first met 
Jim Gavin, she knew he was the kind of 
man who left his mark on the lives of 
those in whom he was interested. Money, 
position, and personal force made it im- 
possible to consider him lightly, and Mag- 
gie was a little amused at herself but not 
too surprised when she fell in love. But 
the death of Jim's estranged wife — and its 
aftermath — causes Maggie to review her 
feelings. NBC-TV. 

THE OOCTOR'S WIFE Dr. Fred Con- 
rad is a fine assistant, and Dan has no 
intention of losing him. Even the difficulty 
that might have arisen from Fred's feeling 
for Dan's wife Julie seems to have been 
smoothed away. But as time goes on a 
curious situation develops — a situation 
which cannot go unnoticed in a town as 
small as Stanton. Will Julie be making a 
mistake if she tries, with her usual effi- 
ciency, to handle it herself? NBC Radio. 

FIRST LOVE Zach James is a hard 
man to live with and to work with because 
it is hard for him to live with himself. 
Only his wife Laurie knows the exacting 
standards toward which he constantly 
pushes himself, and the bitter criticism he 
turns on his own shortcomings. Even when 
the truth about Petey's death emerges, 
will Zach forgive himself for the stubborn 
bad judgment that helped to place him in 
a false position? NBC-TV. 

THE GREATEST GIFT As a doctor, 
Eve knows all too well the difficulties faced 
by an alcoholic's family — and often the 
hopelessness of attempting a cure. But 
when the problem is in her own family it 
becomes something entirely different. Will 
Eve be able to evaluate it honestly as she 
watches her sister Fran struggling and 
succumbing? If happiness is the only real 
cure, must she watch Fran give up all 
hope? NBC-TV. 



THE GVIBING LIGHT The knowl- 
edge that her former husband, Dr. Dick 
Grant, is alive and apparently well raises 
an irresistible hope in Kathy's heart — a 
hope that Dick's friend. Dr. Jim Kelly, 
tries instinctively to discourage even be- 
fore he knows about the new friendships 
and loyalties Dick formed in New York. Is 
Kathy to know heartbreak again after 
realizing the depth of her love for Dick? 
And what about the Bauers' new domestic 
problem? CBS-TV and CBS Radio. 

HAWKINS FALLS In the case of Lona 
and Floyd Corey, familiarity does not 
breed contempt, for even though every bit 
of Hawkins Falls is as familiar as the 
backs of their hands — including its less 
attractive aspects — neither of them would 
wish to live anywhere else or find life any- 
where else quite so rewarding. Is it pos- 
sible that not everyone in town feels 
quite so warmly toward them? NBC-TV. 

HILLTOP HOUSE A pathetic problem 
in loyalty occupies Julie as Alvin Butler, 
released from prison, finds he can only 
clear his name at the expense of his wife's 
health. Knowing that she cannot stand 
the shock of learning that her father was 
the real criminal, Alvin must content him- 
self with regaining the love and faith of 
his children, who have been Julie's 
charges at HiUtop. Meanwhile, will Julie's 
cousin Nina really wreck her marriage? 
CBS Radio 

THE INNER FLAME A wife facing 
the possible break-up of her marriage has 
a bitter enough problem, and Portia Man- 
ning has no illusions about the future even 
as she stands by Walter during his time 
of need. But Dorie Lawlor's problem is 
bad enough, not because she will stand 
accused as the woman who broke up the 
Manning home but because — though she 
will not admit it — her frenzied attraction 
to Walter has run its course. CBS-TV. 

JOYCE JOROAN, M.B. Joyce Jordan 
is a self-reliant career woman — even 
more, a scientist. Accustomed to clear, 
logical thinking even about her own emo- 
tional problems, she is ready to take in 
stride all the objections she knows will be 
raised to her romance with Mike Hill. But 
has she underestimated her own conniv- 
ing little sister, Kitty? With Mike's mother 
as an ally, will Kitty cause far more harm 
than Joyce ever dreamed? NBC-TV. 

JUST PLAIN BILL Bill Davidson and 
his daughter Nancy stand at opposite sides 
of an important question. Nancy believes 
everyone should mind his own business, 
and has pleaded with her father to keep 
out of trouble by letting his friends solve 
their own problems. But Bill's deepest 
belief is that all men must help one an- 
other. Despite his love for Nancy and her 
family, he refuses to turn a deaf ear to 
any friend in trouble. Will he regret it one 
day? NBC Radio {Continued on page 24) 




Yes, here is a man and probably one of the greatest in modern 
American radio -GABRIEL HEATTER. Monday through 
Friday his deep, understanding and accurate appraisal of events 
of the world in which we live and the people with whom we live, 
is brought into millions of homes throughout the United States. 

Hear Gabriel Heatter on any of hundreds of easy-to-dial 
stations of the MUTUAL Network, the world's largest radio 
network ... the ONE network that reaches ALL America. 



Tune in 



on the MUTUAL Network 

Mon. thru Fri.— at : 

7:30-7:45 PM EASTERN TIME 
6:30-6:45 PM CENTRAL TIME 
6:00-6:15 PM MOUNTAIN TIME 
6:00-6:15 PM PACIFIC TIME 



T 
V 
R 

19 



rVE W DESIGNS FOR LIVING 



20 




7025 — Combine dainty filet with regular 
crochet to make this doily or centerpiece. 
Use No. 30 mercerized cotton for 22-inch 
doily; No. 50 for smaller; bedspread cotton 
for larger. Crochet directions included. 250 

882 — Just two main pattern parts to this 
gay, cool maternity top. Trim with color- 
ful embroidery. Maternity Misses' Sizes 
12-20. Tissue pattern, transfer. State size. 250 

7360 — Rows of pineapples, baby-size at 
the waist, grow bigger toward the hem. 
Crochet blouse and skirt of straw or wool 
yarn. Skirt, Waist Sizes 20-22; 24-26; 28-30. 
Blouse 32-34; 36-38. All sizes included. 25^ 

7318 — You'll have baby's new booties, 
cap and jacket finished in a jiffy. Made 
in open and closed shell-stitches in 3-ply 
baby yarn. Use white with pastel. 
Crochet directions included. 250 

679 — Jiffy-crochet this lovely set for 
your home. Use inexpensive rug cotton to 
make both bathroom rug and seat cover. 
Make one for your bedroom, too. 250 

7037 — Embroider the Bluebirds of Happi- 
ness on kitchen towels, pillowcases, and 
other linens. So pretty — and easy. Transfer 
of six embroidery motifs, 4^/4" x 4^/4" to 
5" X 8%"; sixteen, 2" x 3". 250 

.536 — Daughter will be so proud of her new 
middy dress. Anchor motif is easy to em- 
broider — sew another version without 
embroidery. Child's Sizes 2,4,6,8,10. Tissue 
pattern; transfer. State size. 250 





Send twenty-five cents (in coins) for each pattern to: TV Radio Mirror, Needlecraft Service, P.O. Box 137, Old Chelsea Station, 
New York 11, N. Y. Add five cents for each pattern for first-class mailing. Send an additional 25^ for Needlecraft Catalog. 








Feel what's happened! More lather. .. gentler 
lather. . . kinder to your hair and scalp! 



HE.\N 



/()/ik-j^M>/ 



And New White Rain improves on 
eueryf/z/ngthis famous shampoo u;a.s' 
famous for . . . Hke leaving your hair 
sunshine bright, soft and managea- 
ble, fresh as a spring breeze 
Because this is an exciting new for- 
mula developed especially for you . . . 



BY /WkC THE PEOPLE WHO KNOW YOUR HAIR BEST! 



First thing you'll notice about new, 
improved White Rain is more lather. 
Not just some more lather, but loads 
more of the richest, gentlest lather 
that ever caressed your scalp. Makes 
you sure wonderful things will hap- 
pen to your hair . . . and they do. 



T 
V 
R 

21 



WHAT'S NEW FROM COAST TO COAST 

« {^Continued from page 6) 



Godfreys over for a coast-to-coast chat. 

Also on the CBS Radio schedule is the 
new Gary Crosby Show, starring Bing's 
boy in his own half-hour every Sunday 
night. Gary will also continue his vocal 
spot on Tennessee Ernie's Monday - 
Wednesday -Friday broadcasts, and in 
the fall is set for several TV guest spots. 
There's the possibility of his own tele- 
vision show looming in the future, too. 

ABC-TV has set a couple of hillbiUy 
hoedowns on their summer schedule, 
both telecast live from Springfield, Mis- 
souri. The Slim Wilson musical show 
will be seen every Tuesday night for 
an hour, and on Saturday nights Ozark 
Jubilee will go network, also for an hour. 

A few changes on the CBS-TV log: 
Music '55, starring Stan Kenton and his 
orchestra, replaces the Ray Milland show 
on Thursday nights. Life With Father is 
moving to Sundays, replacing Lassie, 
until September 4. On that date CBS-TV 
hopes to find a permanent time spot for 
Father for the faU season. Halls Of Ivy 
is switching from Tuesday night to 
Thursday night for the summer, with its 
fall berth still to be set. Comedian Sam 
Levenson will pinch-hit for Herb 
Shriner on Two For The Money Satur- 
day nights, while the Hoosier humorist 
takes a summer vacation. Shriner will 
return on September 10. The U. S. Steel 
Hour will be seen every other week, 
alternating with a new dramatic show, 
Front Row Center. Songstress Lois Hunt, 
of the Robert Q. Lewis show, and her 
husband, writer Morton Hunt, are await- 
ing a visit from the stork, so Lois has 
given up television temporarily. Jane 
Wilson has taken her place on the 
Robert Q. programs. You'll remember 
Jane as the beauteous brunette soprano 
on the old Fred Waring programs. 

The Arthur Murray Party is back on 
NBC-TV, on Tuesday nights, at least 
until September. As usual, the program 
will star Katherine Murray, the vigorous 
forty-eight-year-old grandmother, who 
does cartwheels for the cameras. 

Bishop Fulton J. Sheen will switch 
from the Du Mont network to ABC-TV 
this fall and he will present his Life Is 
Worth Living series on radio as well. 
The actual figures of Bishop Sheen's 
"salary" have never been officially re- 
leased, but he is said to have received 
$16,000 a week from Du Mont, with a 
promise of an increase from ABC — all of 
which, of course, goes directly to charity. 



T 
V 
R 

22 





Butter — 400 pounds of It — went Into nnaking this cow which was the highlight of 
Garry Moore's I've Got A Secret show when It featured a "country fair" thenne. 



Hit Parader Russell Arms is soon 
to be a "spectacular" performer. 



This 'n' That: 

NBC-TV has signed Maurice Evans 
to produce and direct the Hallmark 
Hall Of Fame series this fall, with the 
first hour-and-a-half production sched- 
uled to be a musical adaptation of "AUce 
in Wonderland." 

MarUn Perkins, of the popular Zoo 
Parade TV show, is taking off for Africa 
in search of rare creatures for the fall 
series of the program. When he comes 
back through customs, Marlin hopes to 
have such cozy little specimens in his 
luggage as pangolins and rare snakes. 

Congratulations to Lawrence Spivak 
and Meet The Press on the tenth an- 
niversary of their news-making panel. 

Actor Gig Young has been set as the 
host for the forthcoming Warner Broth- 
ers Presents television series, which 
debuts this fall. Young will serve as 
emcee, and will also be featured in the 
"Behind the Cameras at Warner Broth- 
ers" segment of each show. 

Looks like Imogene Coca won't have 
her own half-hour show next season, 
after her unfortunate experience this 
year. However, she still has a contract 
with NBC-TV and the network plans to 
spot her in selected guest appearances 
on some of their big shows. 

Susan Strasberg, the teen-age dra- 
matic television actress, has been signed 
by Columbia Pictures to play the role 
of the younger sister, Millie, in "Picnic," 
which will star William Holden and 
Rosalind Russell. 

Ex-Godfrey singer Marion Marlowe 
has been signed to a record contract 
by the Cadence label. Marion was for- 
merly under contract to Columbia Rec- 
ords, but asked for and received her 
release. Cadence also has Julius La Rosa 
and The Chordettes on their roster, all 
former Little Godfreys. 

Songstress Connie Haines has taken 
leave of the Frankie Laine filmed tele- 
vision show to become a mama, but 
plans to return to work later on. 

Ceorgiana Carhart, the "Grand Dame" 
of Du Mont's Life Begins At Eighty show, 
recently celebrated her ninetieth birth- 



day, and quite a celebration she had. 
Georgiana received congratulatory wires 
from Bishop Fulton J. Sheen, New York's 
Governor Averell Harriman. Even Presi- 
dent Eisenhower telegraphed her: "Please 
accept my sincere congratulations upon 
your birthday. May good health be yours 
through many more happy years." 
"Young" Miss Carhart is starting her 
seventh year on television, having joined 
Life Begins At Eighty when she was a 
"kid" of eighty-four. 

Mulling The Mail: 

Miss H.M.V., Cleveland, O.: You might 
write Bill Lawrence at Station WPIX, 
New York City. . . . Mrs. C.R., EUinwood, 
Kans.: Yes, Charlie Applewhite is mar- 
ried. And Jan Arden has been doing club 
work since she left the Robert Q. Lewis 
shows. Robert Q. departed The Name's 
The Same because of the pressure of his 
other television and radio work. . . . View 
Street Neighbors, Oakland, Calif.: Mary 
Livingstone has not retired from show 
business, but she rarely appears on Jack 
Benny's television shows, unless they're 
filmed, as live TV makes her too nervous. 
. . . Miss W.W., Parrish, Ala.: For a pic- 
ture of Julius La Rosa, I suggest you 
write him c/o CBS, 485 Madison Avenue, 
New York City. . . . Mrs. B.L., Ann 
Arbor, Mich.: Ding Dong School now 
originates in New York instead of Chicago 
because Dr. Frances Horwich, Miss 
Frances, has been given an executive 
position with NBC, as Supervisor of 
Children's Programs for the network, 
and this necessitated her presence in 
Manhattan. . . . Miss J.L., Troy, N.Y., 
and others who asked about Gene Ray- 
burn: Gene has been off the Tonight TV 
show because of a bad bout with hepati- 
tis. He is in the hospital at this writing, 
but hopes to leave the hospital soon, 
recuperate at home, and return to work 
sometime this summer. . . . Mr. M.R., 
Chicago, 111.: The catchy theme song on 
The George Gobel Show, is an original 
melody composed by conductor John 
Scott Trotter, and it is titled "Gobelues." 
. . . Mrs. L.N.McM., St. Louis, Mo.: The 




Four generations of One Man's Family: 
Nancy Lou Harrington; Borbra Fuller; 
baby Kimberly Smith;ancl Minetto Ellen. 



Chicago Theater Of The Air was broad- 
cast steadily for almost fifteen years, and 
only went off a few weeks ago, following 
the death of Col. Robert R. McCormick, 
publisher of the Chicago Tribune, who 
started the program on WGN in Chicago, 
the station owned by the Tribune. 

What Ever Happened To ... ? 

Jane Harvey, who sang on many tele- 
vision shows a few seasons back, and was 
also quite active in night-club work? Jane 
has more or less given up her career since 
she married Bob Thiele, director of 
artists and repertoire for Coral Records. 

Teddy Wilson, the jazz pianist, who 
starred on his own radio show over CBS 
on Saturdays? Teddy's program went off 
a few weeks ago and he journeyed to 
Hollywood, where he has just started 
work at Universal-International, playing 
himself in "The Benny Goodman Story." 
He is not set for any radio or television 
work until the picture is finished. 

Harry Prime, former vocalist with 
Ralph Flannagan's orchestra, who also 
sang on several network radio shows out 
of New York City? Harry has recently 
joined the staff of Station WCAU in 
Philadelphia and has been singing on 
local radio shows there. 

Bob Hawk, one of radio's most popu- 
lar emcees and quizmasters? Bob seems 
to have given up all plans for returning 
to radio or television. At the moment he 
is Uving quietly in Santa Barbara, Calif- 
ornia, where he is a partner in a build- 
ing and construction company. 



Ij you have a question about one of your 
favorite people or programs, or wonder 
what has happened to someone on radio 
or television, drop me a line. Miss Jill 
Warren, TV Radio Mirror, 205 East 42nd 
St. New York 17, N. Y., and I'll try my 
best to find out for you and put the in- 
formation in the column. Unfortunately, 
we don't have space to answer all ques- 
tions, so I try to cover those personalities 
and shows about whom I receive the 
most inquiries. Sorry, no personal an- 
swers, so kindly do not enclose stamped 
envelopes or postage, as they cannot be 
returned. 



How to make your life 
abed of roses... 









A^u^ 



7a^ {2(yi — 7fe.^^^^ii^i-^.^<^^4^>w 



'(n^y 



cashmere bouquet 



Cashmere 
BouftueT 



59^29^ 



Plus Tax 




T 
V 
R 

23 



Replies From Survey Reveal: 

NURSES 

9iwD0IICIIINGm»> 

ZONITE 

IDR FEMININE HVGIENt 




Daytime Diary 



(Continued from page 18) 



24 



What Greater Assurance Can a 
Bride-to-be or Married Woman Have 

Women who value true married happi- 
ness and physical charm know how 
essential a cleansing, antiseptic and de- 
odorizing douche is for intimate femi- 
nine cleanliness and after monthly 
periods. 

Douching has become such a part of 
the modern way of life an additional 
survey showed that of the married 
women who replied: 
83.3% douche after monthly periods. 
86.5% at other times. 
So many women are benefiting by this 
sanitary practice — why deny yourself? 
What greater "peace of mind" can a 
woman have than to know zonite is so 
highly regarded among nurses for the 
douche ? 

ZONITE's Many Advantages 

Scientific tests proved no other type 
liquid antiseptic-germicide for the 
douche of all those tested is so power- 
fully EFFECTIVE yet SAFE to body 
tissues as zonite. It's positively non- 
poisonous, non-irritating. You can use 
ZONITE as often as needed without the 
slightest risk of injury. A 
ZONITE douche immediately 
washes away odor-causing 
deposits. It completely de- 
odorizes. Leaves you with a 
sense of well-being and con- 
fidence. Inexpensive. Costs 
only a few pennies per 
douche. Use as directed. 

If any abnormal condition exists, 
see your doctor. 




LOREXZO JONES Still suffering from 
a complete lapse of memory, Lorenzo feels 
that Belle is a threat to his happiness 
rather than the wife he once loved so 
deeply and — Belle believes — would still 
love if he could regain his memory. Only 
when Belle is on the verge of giving up 
and leaving does Lorenzo show any sign of 
recalling the past, but the vague flicker 
has never lasted. Is there any hope for 
Belle? NBC Radio. 

LOVE OF LIFE Vanessa's miscarriage 
takes second place in her thoughts as the 
full truth about Paul's first marriage is 
finally revealed — the truth Paul hoped she 
would never have to know. But the 
knowledge of the miserable fate of the 
child born to Judith Raven has a strange 
and unexpected effect on Van — an effect 
which may change her whole life and keep 
her marriage .from foundering. CBS-TV. 

MA PERKINS A problem unhappily 
reminiscent of one that King Solomon 
solved faces Ma as Gladys and Joe dis- 
cover their missing baby — in the home of 
a young couple who innocently hoped to 
adopt her and have grown to love her. 
There seems no way of avoiding heart- 
break, but fate takes a hand. What about 
the future of the young family so dear to 
Ma's heart? And what about the new — 
and unexpected — ^problem? CBS Radio. 

OI7K GAL SVNBAY The death of Les- 
lie Northurst removes the most serious 
threat that has ever menaced the happi- 
ness of Sunday and Lord Henry, for now 
Lord Henry's title and estates can no 
longer be endangered by Leslie's false 
claim. But Sunday quickly realizes that 
it has given way to another danger — for 
Lord Henry had an excellent motive for 
wanting Leslie out of the way. What hap- 
pens as suspicion gathers around Henry? 
CBS Radio. 

PEPPER VOVNG'S FAMILY While 
the Youngs search desperately for Peggy's 
husband Carter, Carter himself is cltunsily 
trying to establish a new life for himseLf 
in New York, convinced that if he returns 
to Elmdale criminal charges against him 
will disgrace the family. What part will 
pretty, helpful Noel play in this life? And 
what of Peggy, who finds Biff Bradley and 
Dave Wallace taking up more and more 
of her time? NBC Radio. 

PERRY MASON Sam Merriweather is 
a very wealthy, powerful man — and this, 
Perry knows, explains the strange events 
that have suddenly begun to upset the 
smooth efficiency of his organization. Is 
Sam's secretary Lois really losing her 
grip? Or is Sam's daughter Eve respon- 
sible for the odd things Lois appears to 
have done? Whatever the plot is, will it 
succeed before Sam learns that Lois is 
his real daughter, Eve an impostor? CBS 
Radio. 

THE RIGHT TO HAPPINESS Ever 
since Miles Nelson first embarked on a 
political career, Annette Thorpe has made 
herself a powerful force in both his public 
and private life. Not even Miles himself 
can remain blind to Annette's uncon- 
cealed hatred of Carolyn, but he believes 
he can retain control of the situation and 
still avail himself of Annette's consider- 
able influence. But Carolyn knows Miles 
is deceiving himself. NBC Radio. 



THE ROAD OF LIFE Dr. Jim Brent 
continues his attentions to Sibyl Overton 
Fuller, hoping to unmask her role in Joce- 
lyn's deportation. But Sibyl has deceived 
herself into believing that Jim really loves 
her and will divorce Jocelyn. What will 
happen as Sibyl tries to force the issue 
and as she herself is subjected to pressure 
by those who know her secret? And how 
will Jim react when he learns that Joce- 
lyn, too, has a secret — the child she is to 
bear him? CBS-TV and CBS Radio. 

THE ROMANCE OF HELEN TRENT 

Buoyed up by hope that Gil Whitney's 
divorce from his wife Cynthia will at last 
clear the way for his marriage to her, 
Helen refuses to take seriously the con- 
stant pursuit of millionaire Brett Chap- 
man. But Chapman has vowed that he 
will recapture Helen's interest. Has he 
found an unwitting ally in Gil's own jeal- 
ousy — and another in Gil's pretty secre- 
tary. Fay Granville? CBS Radio. 

ROSEMARY Bill's newspaper campaign 
against the drug-pushing criminals who 
have been getting to Springdale's young- 
sters has brought him up against bigger 
opposition than he realizes. Time after 
time he and the police find themselves on 
the verge of success only to have it slip 
out of their reach. How soon will Bill 
realize that Ray Calder, considered a 
friend by Rosemary, has a lot to do with 
this? CBS Radio. 

SEARCH FOR TOMORROW Stu 

Bergman's boss unwittingly turns a hur- 
ricane force loose in Henderson when his 
Southern niece, Melissa, comes .up for a 
visit. Ruthless and determined, Melissa 
has a single-minded plan to capture a 
rich husband for herself and the charm, 
when she cares to turn it on, to make this 
possible. Will it matter to her that the 
man she selects is married — or that she 
may indirectly aid an evil plot? CBS -TV. 

SECOND HUSBAND Despite her faith 
in Wayne's love, Diane Lockwood cannot 
help wondering if her second marriage will 
turn out to be a mistake. Her two children 
are still not completely reconciled to ac- 
cepting Wayne as their father, and Wayne's 
family have never given up hoping that 
his cousin, Claire Walcott, would become 
his wife. Will Claire, with the subtle help 
of Wayne's mother, manage to cause real 
trouble in this new marriage? CBS Radio. 

THE SECOND MRS. BURTON 

Terry's mother-in-law, the dowager Mrs. 
Burton, is so determined to run the lives 
of her children that she seems willing to 
damage her own interests to keep them 
from acting independently. In the recent 
fracas over the paper she and Stan jointly 
own, she very nearly defrauded herself 
as she tried to teach Stan a lesson. If 
she got married — as the family hopes she 
will — would she really be less of a prob- 
lem? CBS Radio. 

THE SECRET STORM Some time ago, 
after the death of his wife, Peter Ames 
decided to stay in the town where he had 
built his life, despite the fact that his sis- 
ter-in-law's neurotic hatred of him prom- 
ised little peace for the future. Now that 
Peter has found a new chance for happi- 
ness, would he be wiser to pull out be- 
fore Pauline ruins not only his future but 
th=?t of his children? CBS-TV. 



ST£LI..t DALLAS Lovely Janice Ben- 
net had thrown new complications into 
the already tangled situation involving 
Stella's daughter Laurel. In an effort to 
save Laurel's marriage, Stella has en- 
couraged a pretended romance between 
Janice and Stanley Warrick, whose mother 
has tried to engineer a divorce between 
Laurel and Dick Grosvenor. Has Stella 
only hastened disaster? NBC Radio. 

THiS MS \OnA DRAKE The bitter 
aftermath of her husband Fred's death is 
slightly relieved for Nora as she and the 
police succeed in bringing to justice the 
criminals responsible for it. But punish- 
ing them is another problem — a problem 
complicated for Nora by a new and puz- 
zling friendship. What part will the at- 
tractive young reporter David play in her 
life — and what strange relationship de- 
velops with his sister? CBS Radio. 

VALiAXT LADY Bill Eraser's accident 
has left him in a peculiar psychological 
condition — a fear of the outside world that 
Margot intends to turn to her own advan- 
tage by feaggerating. Helen's affectionate 
effort to help Bill is hampered not only by 
Margot's wiUness but by her own inability 
to offer the kind of love Bill really wants 
from her. Meanwhile, in New York, Diane 
falls deeper into a web she cannot even 
understand. CBS-TV. 

WEXDY WAnnE\ A\D THE iVEW S 

Busy days as editor of a small-town paper 
give Wendy the illusion that her life is 
fully occupied. But she knows all too well 
that it is an illusion, for the happiness 
of her marriage to Mark — even though it 
ended in tragedy — has left her with the 
knowledge that a career is not enough to 
fill her life completely. CBS Radio. 

WUEy A GiRL MARRiES The 

trumped-up accusation of bribery against 
which Harry Davis must defend himself 
has caused Joan to undertake some dan- 
gerous activities. Probing for the secrets 
of the gambling underworld which threat- 
ens them, she has made more enemies and 
some odd friends — and loyalty to these 
new friends leads Joan to a crisis. Will 
she have to call on Phil Stanley for help? 
ABC Radio. 

W03tAN IX MY HOl'SE Now that 
the Carters are more or less grown-up, 
there aren't so many of them around the 
Carter house much of the time. And yet, 
no matter how far they roam, they keep 
coming back to the center of the family 
when there are problems to be solved. 
Jessie Carter knows that it is now her 
function to know when to help, how much 
to help — and when not to help at all. 
NBC Radio. 

YOl'XG DR. MALONE Marcia Sut- 
ton Mason finds herself caught in her own 
trap as the friendship she invented for 
Tracey Malone turns out to be the real 
thing. Will she continue with the plan she 
and her ambitious husband conceived — the 
plan that, if successful, will destroy Jerry 
Malone's position as head of the Dineen 
Clinic and put Ted in his place? Or will 
loyalty to Tracey make a startling change 
in her whole life? CBS Radio. 

YOLXG WIDDER DROWN Though 
he knows that he was tricked into mar- 
riage with Millicent, Dr. Anthony Loring 
is at last forced to realize that at the 
moment there is no legal way of ending 
that marriage. Faced with the knowledge 
that he must renounce all hope of a future 
with Ellen Brown, Anthony becomes 
strangely ill, and his illness causes an im- 
portant change in Ellen's life. NBC Radio. 



The one-the only-the original 
Ckttkks '$iteti -^^0 put Lanolin 
in the language-makes this 
special offer for beautiful hair! 





LiQUiO 

formula 9 l formula 9 




Super Lanolin Formula 9 puts 
new life in dead-looking hair 

Before Charles Antell came on the scene, you hardly heard of the 
word LANOLIN. Now there are hundreds of products for hair care, 
all trying to inoitate the original. 

But now they're all outdated! Old fashioned! Now there's Charles 
Antell Formula 9 with SUPER-LanoHn, that gives you a clean, healthy 
scalp and beautiful, lustrous hair. SUPER-Lanolin is actually three 
times more beneficial to hair and scalp because it retains three times 
the vital moisture and natural oUs healthy hair needs. 

To get you to try this new, improved Charles Antell Formula 9 , 
with SUPER-Lanolin, we make the very special offer above. Try it! 
If you don't hke it — your money will be cheerfuUy refunded! 

Remember! There's only one Charles Antell! There's only one 
SUPER-Lanolin! Beware of imitations! 

CHARLES ANTELL, INC., BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



25 



As Tinker the Toymaker 
and Corny the Cloivn over 
W ABC-TV, genial 
Boh Keeshan proves he's 




Tinker's Work Shop: "Tinker" and his young viewers chat and breakfast together. 



DOUBLY DELIGHTFUL 




Time For Fun: Bob is back at noon, as Corny the Clown, 
with his sponiel, Pudgie, to have lunch with youngsters. 



26 



NEVER underestimate the wisdom of a child" is a motto 
quiet-spoken, gentle -mannered Bob Keeshan has lived 
by with tremendous success. As Tinker the Toymaker 
on Tinker's Work Shop, seen daily over New York's Station 
WABC-TV from 8 to 9 A.M., and as Corny the Clovm on 
Tiw,e For Fun, at noon on the same station, Bob is the 
rage of the junior T Viewing set. Entertainment and 
instruction keynote both Bob's shows as he deals with 
everything from good safety and living habits to advice on 
how to dress, what the weather's like, and why youngsters 
should not "hide yourself in the refrigerator." And, of 
course, Bob tells stories, plays records, and features little 
comedy sketches. Scores of letters of approval and 
gratitude from children and adults testify constantly that 
Bob possesses an unusual and invaluable understanding of 
children. This is backed by nine years of continuous 
experience with little ones. . . . Bob had his first introduc- 
tion to show business as an NBC page boy. After time 
out during the war when he served in the Marines, he 
returned to NBC, still as a page, and much of his work 
centered about Bob Smith's office. At the time. Smith had a 
TV show called Triple B Ranch. Later, when Howdy 
Doody was created. Smith asked Bob to join him as a special 
assistant. As a general "utility man," Bob would occa- 
sionally appear on-camera. Eventually, this led to his 
being dressed as a clown, and making regular appearances. 
For five years. Bob delighted children as Clarabell the 
Clown. Then he decided to branch out on his own. 
Eight months later, he joined WABC-TV as Corny the 
Clown and, a year later, he doubled his delightful efforts 
and became Tinker the Toymaker as well. ... In addition 
to his understanding of children. Bob has always shown 
a great love for them. A model family man, he is the father 
of three: Michael, 4; Laurie, 2; and Maeve, 6 months. 
Bob met his wife five years ago when she was a receptionist 
at ABC. At the time, Jeanne was bent on a career in 
radio, but Bob soon changed her mind. The Keeshans now 
live in West Islip, Long Island, where Bob is active in 
community affairs, serving on the Board of Education and 
taking part in many civic activities. Bob's fondest 
leisure-time activity is gardening, which, he says, "I enjoy 
very much, though I'm not very good at it." . . . Nine 
years as a youngsters' delight have convinced Bob that this 
is the kind of work he wants to keep doing indefinitely. 
It has long been obvious that his thousands of little 
followers hope he will do just that. 



For the Easiest Permanent 
of Your Life . . . 





fcASUAL 

PIN- CURL A 






SET IT / 



S' 



Set your pin-curls just as you always do. 
_ No need for anyone to help 






\ 



WET IT / 



I 



4 



db 



Apply Casual lotion just once. 
15 minutes later, rinse with clear water. 



FORGET IT.' 



That's all there is to it! CASUAL is 

self-neutralizing. There's no resetting. 

Your work is finished I 



Naturally lovely, carefree curls 

that last for weeks ... 

Casual is the word for it . . . soft, carefree waves 

and curls — never tight or kinky— beautifully manageable, 

perfect for the new flattering hair styles that highlight the softer, 

natural look. Tonight — give yourself the loveliest wave 

of your life — a Casual pin-curl permanent! 

takes just 15 minutes more than setting your hair! 

$1.50 PLUS TAX 




RRfECipUS COIVII 



YOUR l»n(ECl€>US COIVIRI-EXIOIM DESERVES 




'I just love new cold cream Camay," says Mrs. Williom Albert Neff, a beautiful Camay Bride. "It's so mild 
and gentle, and it always leaves my skin feeling wonderfully soft and smooth." 



J^O itkPiy C^eOu^ 0<^ ^ClAA^bM Mmyjkhv ^Jikt UimOUU 



( 



With that skin-pampering mildness, exclusive fragrance, 
and lu.xurious lather, Camay with cold cream is the beauty secret 
of so many exquisite brides. And it can be the best friend 
your complexion ever had. Let it bring new loveliness to you. 
Change to regular care . . . Camay's Caressing Care. 
You'll be delif^hted as your skin becomes fresher, smoother, 
softer. Remember, too, there's precious cold cream in Camay, 
extra luxury at no extra cost. For your beauty and your bath, 
there's no liner soap in all the world ! 



Let It help you to a. softer, smoother, 

more radiant complexion ! 




THE SOAP 



OF BEAUTIFUL WOMEN 




To the three lovely singing McGuires, "sisters" is much more than just a word 



By MARTIN COHEN 



THE AMAZING STORY began with the arrival of Asa 
and Lily McGuire's first little girl on July 30, 1928. 
Mrs. McGuire cradled baby Chris and crooned: 
"You're so cute, you should have been twins." About 
a year and a half later, Dot came along, and Mrs. 



McGuire put Chris and Dot together, shook her head 
in wonderment, and purred: "You should have been 
triplets." A year later, Phyllis was born. Three little 
girls. No more, no less. 

If Mr. McGuire had expected a boy — after all, his 

See Next Page- 



mt 




Chris, Phyl and Dot work hard — but it's fun when they 
read the McGuIre Sisters' growing, glowing fan mall. 




Time out for a snack — but you can be sure the girls are 
discussing their songs, or at least humming a happy tune. 



a^/m^ mQ^A 



^/mm/i 



f 



{Continued) 



brothers each had sons in their families — he has long 
since forgotten any fleeting disappointment. Today, he 
ranks first among the McGuire Sisters' fans, and the 
tunefid trio has fan clubs in such farflung areas as the 
Philippines, Mexico, Cuba, Japan, Holland, Brooklyn, 
and Texas. They have definitely arrived. 

But, no matter how^ triiimphant the McGuire Sisters 
have been, no matter how chic and sophisticated they 
seem, Chris and Dot and Phyllis are essentially a home 



product, like real corn fritters or old-fashioned angel 
cake. Before they ever left home, they had poise and 
dignity, discipline and endurance, faith and sincerity. 
Even their singing is a home product, for they began 
harmonizing when Phyllis, the baby, reached three 
and was old enough to memorize. The girls — ^with 
shingle bobs and fashionable bangs — sang for f\in, as 
did their parents, who played the mandolin and guitar. 
Home was a frame house, always freshly painted in 



Biggest part of their professional life to date, of course, has been their appearances on the great Arthur Godfrey pro- 
grams. In the number below, Arthur himself "goes Dutch" with the McSuire Sisters for the all-seeing TV cameras. 



30 






Then back to their piano and their constant practic 
this time, rehearsing for a song they'll record next day. 



Under the guidance of manager-direcfor Murray Kane, 
the McGuire Sisters harmonize a disc for Coral Records. 



white with cream trimmings, in Middleton, Ohio. "Our 
hving room was Hke a hotel lobby," Chris recalls. 
"People were visiting every night. There were always 
games and singing." 

Chris, today a lithe beauty, was then the plump one 
and wore chubby sizes. Her early years were spent 
mostly in running away. "It's no trick for a young 
child to wake up first," she says, "so I quietly went 
about my own business — which was looking for 
China." 

As a toddler, they'd find Chris sitting in the middle 
of the street in her nightgown. As her legs grew, so 
did her ambitions, and then she got as far as Main 
Street. Eventually, she reached her favorite highway, 
Route 25, still in her nightgown. 

"When Chris wasn't hitchhiking, she headed for 
Mother's vanity," Dot says. "That's the picture of her 
I'll never forget. Vei-y methodically she would powder 
each of her feet, her right knee and the top of her 
head until powder fairly dripped from her long eye- 
lashes." 

These delightful and sometimes delirious damsels 
are all the same height, five-eight. They wear the 
same size dress — ten — but they buy twelve for the 
length. They favor black pumps and gray or black 
skirts and harmonizing blouses. They are all brunettes, 
with brown eyes and brown hair, though Dot is a 
touch on the exotic side, with charcoal-brown eyes that 
smoke, smoulder or bum — take your choice. 

Dot, too, is the only one who has retained the full 
flavor of their Dixie accent, which was picked up at 
home from their Kentucky-born parents. But you 
don't hear much of it, for Dot is quiet, just as she was 
as a child. "Mother used to say Dot was perfect," 
Chris remembers, "until she (Continued on page 89) 

The McGuire Sisters sing on: Arthur Godfrey Time, CBS Radio, 
M-F, 10 A.M., and CBS-TV, M-Th, 10:30 A.M.,' under multiple 
sponsorship — Arthur Godfrey And His Friends, CBS-TV, Wed., 8 
P.M., under sponsorship of The Toni Company, Pillsbury Mills, 
and Frigidaire — and Arthur Godfrey's Digest, CBS Radio, Eri., 
8 P.M., under multiple sponsorship. (All times given are EDT.) 




Above, they pack for a night-club engagement — under 
the golden disc which shows their recording of "Sincere- 
ly" topped a million sales. Below, they give their triple 
autographs — as their mother (at right) watches proudly. 





As Martin Block sp 




By 

IRA 

H. 

KNASTER 



if's on the RECORD 



MARTIN Block's "BaUroom" is bigger and better than 
ever. Once its dimensions stretched merely from 
say, upper Connecticut to southern New Jersey, and 
west, perhaps, to points in Pennsylvania. Today— thanks to 
the ABC Radio network — his "Make Believe Ballroom" 
spreads its melodic enticements clear across the conti- 
nent. A lot more listeners are pleased about this, and ABC 
Radio is right proud. Meanwhile, the United States Post 
Office— readily adaptable to sharp upswings in its work- 



load — has pi^obably taken a philosophical view of Martin 
Block's expansion from local station to network status. 

On Martin's desk, the morning batch of mail was 
stacked high. Correspondence from bandleaders and 
vocalists. Communiques from recording companies. A mis- 
cellany of press releases. But mainly, and in great num- 
bers, letters from listeners. 

Impeccably dressed in a slate-blue suit, soft-toned shirt 
and subdued tie, Martin leaned {Continued on page 81) 



The Martin Block Show is heard over the ABC Radio network, M-F, from 2:30 to 4 P.M. EDT. Martin Block's Make Believe Ballroom is 
heard over Station WABC Radio (New York), M-F, from 2:30 to 6:45 P.M., and Sat., from 9 A.M. to noon and from 6 to 7:30 P.M. 



32 



^he tunes, a third generation listens— and hears a message of service and devotion 




Above — Martin Block not only believes thot teenagers deserve a chance for wholesome recreation. He does something 
about It, with his frequent high-school get-togethers. "I've got a personal ax to grind in this matter," he grins. 
B,elow — Martin and Esther with their sons Martin, Jr., 14, Joel Christopher, 10, and Michael, six-going-on-seven. 



L 



%0^ 



W 



) 





I 



.r 




/ 



32 




Martin 



the tones, a third generation listens-and hears a message of service and devotion 





By 

IRA 

H. 

KNASTER 



If 's on ihe RECORD 



MARUN Block's "Ballroom" is bigger and better than 
ever. Once its dimensions stretched merely from 
say, upper Connecticut to southern New Jersey, and 
west, perhaps, to points in Pennsylvania. Today — thanks to 
the ABC Radio network — his "Make Believe Ballroom" 
spreads its melodic enticements clear across the conti- 
nent, A lot more listeners are pleased about this, and ABC 
Radio is right proud. Meanwhile, the United States Post 
Office — readily adaptable to sharp upswings in its work- 



load—has probably taken a philosophical view of Martin 
Block's expansion from local station to network status. 

On Martin's desk, the morning batch of mail was 
stacked high. Correspondence from bandleaders a" 
vocalists. Communiques from recording companies. A mis- 
cellany of press releases. But mainly, and in great num- 
bers, letters from listeners. , .^ 

Impeccably dressed in a slate-blue suit, soft-toned sW 
and subdued tie, Martin leaned (Continued on page o'-l 



Above — Martin Block not only believes that teenagers deserve o chance for wholesome recreation. He does something 
about it, with his frequent high-school get-togethers. "I've got a personal ax to grind in this matter," he grins. 
B,elow — Martin and Esther with their sons Martin, Jr., 14, Joel Christopher, 10, and Michael, six-golng-on-seven. 



The Martin Block Show is heard over the ABC Radio network, M-F, from 2M to 4 P.M. EDT. Martin Block's Make Believe Ballroom^ 
heard over Station WABC Radio (New York), M-F, from 2:30 to 6:45 P.M., and Sal., from 9 A.M. to noon and from 6 to 7:30 f.m- 




MEET LINDA PORTER 



Alias Mrs. Jack C. Louis — Gloria at home with her husband, sons Ashley, 9, and "J.C.," 6, and daughter Tish, \'Vi. 







..;s<S^^ J(lKi% 




fZ - — 



M 




Gloria Louis, wife and mother, 
speaks to all ivives and mothers on 
Way Of The World and Justice 

By ALICE FRANCIS 

WHEN Gloria Loiiis — who is Linda Porter on the 
dramatic TV programs, Way Of The World and 
Justice — goes home at noon to have lunch with 
her children, she slips back as easily into the role 
of wife and mother as if she had never heard of 
television. It's different with the kids, however. Nine- 
year-old Ashley, a "Davy Crockett" fan, may have 
put on his coonskin cap and thereby turned into that 
famous frontiersmian. Six-year-old J. C. (called 
by his initials to distinguish him from his daddy. Jack 
C. Louis, Sr.) may have turned into his idol, 
"Superman" Clark Kent, and insistf that his mother 
answ^er to the name of Lois Lane, Kent's girl 
friend. Only Tish (baby {Continued on page 88) 




Her sons agree that Gloria's great on TV 
as Linda Porter in Way Of The World (above, 
with director Fred Carr) — but not as great 
as either "Superman" or "Davy Crockett"! 




Gloria Louis is seen and heard as Linda Porter, 
hostess and narrator on Way Of The World, NBC- TV, 
]^I-F, 10:30 A.M. EDT, and Justice, NBC-TV, Thurs., 
8:30 P.M. EDT, under sponsorship of the Borden Co. 



35 




NEW STAR 
IN THE SKY 

Ifs hard to shine when your dad's 

a whole constellation, hut 

Gary Crosby's doing it— on his own 



By MAXINE ARNOLD 

NOT MANY MONTHS AGO, a husky blond young 
man drove away from his fraternity house 
and the tree-shaded campus of Stanford 
University and headed his red hardtop Mei'cury 
south to show business. Driving away, Gary Crosby 
had one regret: Disappointing a dad who'd fol- 
lowed that same magic beat which — like the Pipes 
of Pan — for Gai-y, too, was ever-beckoning. 

For, like another Rhythm Boy before him, Gary 
Crosby was born with a beat in his very bones. 
A beat that wouldn't be denied. Born to music 
inside him that wouldn't stop. And he, too, was 
destined eventually to get {Continued on page 94) 



Gary Crosby sings on The Tennessee Ernie Show. CBS Radio, 
M-F, 7:05 P.M. EDT, as sponsored by Philip Morris Cigarettes, 
Campana Cosmetics, and NoDoz. The Gary Crosby Show is heard 
Sundays over CBS Radio (check local papers for exact time). 



Today, he sings with Tennessee Ernie (obove) and on his own show (below, left, with musical director Buddy Bregman). 
Yesterday, he was a "hiappy Innna+e" at Bellarnnine Prep (below, center — Les Gargan in foreground. Father Costa at right). 




[>> ^\? 







At left, Patti's mother helps her dress for the prom 
in "the prettiest formal yet — all white nylon tulle!" 



Patti O^Neill, just turned 18, has 
her own role in The Secret Storm 
and a big date for the senior prom! 

By LILLA ANDERSON 



THIS IS the summer when petite Patti O'NeUl faces 
the most important question in any pretty young 
girl's life: Should she plan, next fall, to work, go 
to college, or marry? She was graduated from high 
school in Juhe and on July 5 celebrated that super- 
important eighteenth birthday. 

The O'Neill phone rings frequently. The male voice 
which asks, "Is Patti home?" may belong to a senior at 
Yale, a sophonaore at Pennsylvania, a youthful actor 
in TV, the boy across the street, or any one of a half- 
dozen nice young men-about-Manhattan. 

But because it may also belong to a big-name mag- 
azine photographer, a fashion coordinator or a televi- 
sion producer, the classic problem is intensified in 
Patti's case. Daydreams of future romance must com- 
pete with the excitement of a present career. She is 
Debbie Ness on the CBS-TV serial, The Secret Storm, 
and has had parts on big dramatic programs. In Mr. 
Peepers, she was one of the pupils, "tintil I outgrew 
it." She also has appeared in one Broadway play, 
"Anniversary Waltz," playing with Macdonald Carey. 



38 



r 



u 



X 



^ 



/ 




Above, Patti gives a fashion preview for her parents, 
John and Poula O'Neill, lust before her date arrives. 



Directors seek Patti when they need a pint-sized 
girl with a perfect figure. She is five feet, two inches 
tall, weighs one hiondred pounds, wears a size five or 
seven, junior. Her brown hair has auburn highlights, 
her dark eyes are expressive, and her warm, creamy 
skin needs little make-up. 

Loving every moment of the studio excitement, 
Patti has almost ruled out college. "It woxild be nice 
to go away to school," she confides. "Living on campus 
sounds Uke so much i^xn.. But I really don't like to 
study — and I hate to think of starting work all over 
again, four years from now. I'm just going to take a 
few general classes at Columbia." 

The boy friends add to her hking of the status quo. 
"They're all wonderful," she says. "And all equally 
important. Today, I mean. That may change tomor- 
row." 

She did go steady for a while. "But then I went 
out on the road with 'Anniversary Waltz' — and I 
really don't think it is practical to go steady when 
you're in different towns, do you?" Then candor 




And here he is — with on orchid corsage for Patti in 
that box — Eddie Benjamin, from the U. of Pennsylvania. 




Meet the folks! Patti introduces Eddie to her parents 
— then it's off to the prom, for one enchonted evening. 



See Next Page 



39 




Patti O'Neill, just turned 18, has 
her own role in The Secret Storm 
and a big date for the senior prom! 
By LILLA ANDERSON 




38 



At left, Patti's mother helps her dress for the prom 
in "the prettiest formal yet — all white nylon tulle!" 



THIS IS the summer when petite Patti O'Neill faces 
the most important question in any pretty young 
girl's life: Should she plan, next fall, to work, go 
to college, or marry? She was graduated from high 
school in June and on July 5 celebrated that super- 
important eighteenth birthday. 

The O'Neill phone rings frequently. The male voice 
which asks, "Is Patti home?" may belong to a senior at 
Yale, a sophomore at Pennsylvania, a youthful actor 
in TV, the boy across the street, or any one of a half- 
dozen nice young men-about-Manhattan. 

But because it may also belong to a big-name mag- 
azme photographer, a fashion coordinator or a televi- 
sion producer, the classic problem is intensified in 
Patti's case. Daydreams of future romance must com- 
pete with the excitement of a present career. She is 
Debbie Ness on the CBS-TV serial, The Secret Storm, 
and has had parts on big dramatic programs. In Mr. 
Peepers, she was one of the pupUs, "until I outgrew 
It. She also has appeared in one Broadway plaV' 
Anniversary Waltz," playing with Macdonald Carey. 



Above, Patti gives a fashion preview for her parents, 
John and Paula O'Neill, just before her date arrives. 



Directors seek Patti when they need a pint-sized 
girl with a perfect figure. She is five feet, two inches 
tall, weighs one hundred pounds, wears a size five or 
seven, junior. Her brown hair has auburn highlights, 
ner dark eyes are expressive, and her warm, creamy 
skin needs little make-up. 

Loving every moment of the studio excitement, 
Patti has almost ruled out college. "It would be nice 
to go away to school," she confides. "Living on campus 
sounds like so much fun. But I really don't like to 
study— and I hate to think of starting work all over 
again, four years from now. I'm just going to take a 
few general classes at Columbia." 
., '^^^_'^°y friends add to her liking of the status quo. 
They're all wonderful," she says. "And all equally 
important. Today, I mean. That may change tomor- 
row." 

She did go steady for a while. "But then I went 
out on the road with 'Anniversary Waltz'— and I 
really don't think it is practical to go steady when 
you're in different towns, do you?" Then candor 




And here he is— with an orchid corsage for Patti in 
that box— Eddie Benjamin, from the U. of Pennsylvania. 




Meet the folks! Patti introduces Eddie to her parents 
— then it's off to the prom, for one enchanted evening. 



See Next Page 



39 






(Continued) 




Patti will always treasure these moments: 
Their arrival at the Delmonico, the dances 
with Eddie and her classmates at the Pro- 
fessional Children's School senior prom. 





Back to work: Photographer Jerry Urgo and producer Dick Dunn 



overcomes her. "Besides, I was meeting so many interest- 
ing people and being invited to go so many places. I 
didn't want to miss that. I had such a happy time." 

Happiness, perhaps, is that extra and distinctive quality 
which Patti has to offer audiences. It carries through in 
the sparkle of her eyes, the lilt of her voice, the quick 
grace of her movements. 

Happiness, one also gathei-s during a visit to the O'Neill 
home, is a family habit. Their sense of humor keeps life 
in good balance. Patti's father, John O'Neill— a hearty 
Irishman, quick with a joke or a story — has worked 
twenty-six years for one of the major milk companies. 
Her mother, Paula, who has virtually been a partner in 
Patti's career, is endowed with a rare combination of 
gentleness, wit and good sense. Originally, there were 
five O'Neills, but Gloria and Vivian, the older daughters, 
have now married and left home. 

Mrs. O'Neill has a vivid and quick characterization of 
their life together: "We have a hard time getting away 
from the dinner table before nine o'clock. We like to sit 
around talking to each other." 



'9 



\/' 





-jinmv 




watch Patti (center) playing Debbie in The Secret Storm, with Warren Berllnger (left), Peter Hobbs and Haila Stoddard. 



Their home is a comfortable two-story brick house in 
Queens, one of New York's least-crowded and most 
pleasant boroughs. Patti — who describes her father as 
"the original do-it-yourselfer" — proudly shows off the 
basement playroom which he tiled and the bathroom he 
rebuilt and decorated in a most luxurious fashion. 

Together, the family has given Patti a heritage of secur- 
ity — the security which comes, not from wealth, but from 
love and peace of mind. Her earnings have never in- 
fluenced their standard of living. She has never been 
under pressure. She has been free to grow and advance 
naturally. Says Mrs. O'Neill, "We have never put her 
on a pedestal. She does her share of the household chores. 
We're all members of this family." 

None of them had any previous connection with show 
business. "It happened almost by accident," says Mrs. 
O'Neill. "Sometimes things just seem to be mapped out 
for you." (Continued on page 77) 

Patti O'Neill is Debbie in The Secret Storm, CBS-TV, M-F, 4:15 P.M. 
EDT, a.= sponsored by Whitehall Pharmacal Co. and Boyle-Midway. 



It was Jerry Urge who "discovered" Patti 
for the cameras — and is he proud of her now! 





m 






I^MM-C (Continued) 




Patti will always treasure these moments: 
Their orrival at the Delmonico, the dances 
with Eddie and her classmates at the Pro- 
tessionol Children's School senior prom. 





Back to worit: Photographer Jerry Urgo and producer Dick 



overcomes her. "Besides, I was meeting so many interest- 
ing people and being invited to go so many places. I 
didn't want to miss that. I had such a happy time." 

Happiness, perhaps, is that extra and distinctive quality 
which Patti has to offer audiences. It carries through in 
the sparkle of her eyes, the lilt of her voice, the quick 
grace of her movements. 

Happiness, one also gathers during a visit to the O'Neill 
home, is a family habit. Their sense of humor keeps life 
in good balance. Patti's father, John O'Neill— a hearty 
Irishman, quick with a joke or a story — has worked 
twenty-six years for one of the major milk companies. 
Her mother, Paula, who has virtually been a partner in 
Patti's career, is endowed with a rare combination of 
gentleness, wit and good sense. Originally, there were 
five O'NeiUs, but Gloria and Vivian, the older daughters, 
have now married and left home. 

Mrs. O'Neill has a vivid and quick characterization of 
their life together: "We have a hard time getting away 
from the dinner table before nine o'clock. We like to sit 
around talking to each other " 



watch Patti (center) playing Debbie in The Secret Storm, with Warren Berlinger (left), Peter Hobbs and Haila Stoddard. 



Their home is a comfortable two-story brick house in 
Queens, one of New York's least-crowded and most 
pleasant boroughs. Patti — who describes her father as 
' the original do-it-yourselfer" — proudly shows ofl the 
basement playroom which he tiled and the bathroom he 
rebuilt and decorated in a most luxurious fashion. 

Together, the family has given Patti a heritage of secur- 
ity — the security which comes, not from wealth, but from 
love and peace of mind. Her earnings have never in- 
fluenced their standard of living. She has never been 
under pressure. She has been free to grow and advance 
naturally. Says Mrs. O'Neill, "We have never put her 
on a pedestal. She does her share of the household chores. 
We're all members of this family." 

None of them had any previous connection with show 
business. "It happened almost by accident," says Mrs. 
O'Neill. "Sometimes things just seem to be mapperl out 
for you." (Continued on page 77) 

Patti O'Neill is Debbie in The Secret Storm, CB.S-TV, M-F, 4:15 P.M. 
EOT, as sponsored bv Whiteliall Pbarmacal Co. and Boyle-Midway. 



It was Jerry Urgo who "discovered" Patti 
for the cameras— and is he proud of her now! 





^A/ITH A 



TV's Welcome Travelers is welcome 

news, both to its singing host 

and to Jack Smith's many loyal fans 

By ED MEYERSON 

SOONER OR LATER, every American in Paris 
visits the Eiffel Tower. Here, he can 
not only see the French capital from 
the air, he can see all the other Americans 
in Paris, as well. So it was not surprising, 
when Mr. and Mrs. Jack Smith entered 
a restaurant in the Tower, that friends from 
"back home" recognized them. "Hey, 
Smitty!" someone called, and soon there was 
a happy reunion in the middle of the 
restaurant. That's how the diners happened 
to notice that there was a celebrity in 
their midst. Back (Continued on page 70) 



Jack Smith is host of Welcome Travelers, on CBS-TV, 
MF, 1:30 P.M. EDT, as sponsored by the Procter & 
Gamble Co. for Camay, Ivory Snow, Oxydol and Draft. 




Hostess Pat Meikle helps Jack "welcome 
travelers" to a fun-filled, prize-pocked show. 



SMILE IN HIS VOICE 




Jack met his "VIckii" because they'd been born on the sanne 
day — and friends later gave one party for both of thenn. 
They wed on the birthday when both became eighteen 





Vickii has been by Jack's side throughout his early cross-country tours to the triumph of that first show of his own 
and the purchase of their first real home — where "Buff" (above, left) has become very much a part of the Smith family. 



43 



An anxious vigil in the 
hospital teaches Julie Palmer 
a new lesson in courage 
as a child fights for its life 



DRIVING HOME from the hospital with 
her husband, Dr. Dan Palmer, Julie's 
thoughts focused on the nightmare 
of events just passed. It had started at 
Tw^in Oaks — the home for cardiac children 
— where the roof had collapsed, critically 
injuring little Patsy Lewis. Again, Julie 
felt the dread of the anxious hours which 
followed. Patsy was taken to the hospital, 
where Dan had assisted a noted brain 
surgeon in the fight for the child's life. . . . 
Julie could not help feeling responsible 
for Patsy and the tragedy at Twin Oaks, 
which she herself had worked so hard to 
help establish. For she realized, with 
horror, that Peter CoUette — the builder 
she had recommended — had not followed 
the specifications demanded. . . . Julie had 
felt another pang of guilt at the hospital 
when Dr. Fred Conrad, Dan's assistant, 
tried to reassure her about Patsy. Fred 
was so deeply, unhappily in love with 
Julie^ — and for this, too, Julie felt respon- 
sible. . . . Th,e hours of waiting had preyed 
upon Julie and she had felt her usual 
confidence slipping away. Russell Swayne, 
head of Twin Oaks' board of directors, had 
resigned, placing the blame for the acci- 
dent squarely on Julie and Dan. This 
meant that the Carver Foundation would 



probably withdraw its financial support, 
forcing Twin Oaks to close. Although 
many dear friends had remained loyal to 
Twin Oaks, Julie could not stifle her dis- 
appointment and apprehension about all 
the others who had withdrawn their help. 
. . . The fears of the future, however, had 
been washed away when Dan emerged 
from the operating room to tell Julie, "The 
operation was a success. Patsy's a fighter 
and she's fighting hard for her own life. 
It's a lonely battle, but I think she'll win." 
When Julie looked puzzled, Dan ex- 
plained: "Yoxing or old, small or large, 
there are times when we have to fight 
alone, Julie.". . . Now, driving home to her 
own Timmy, those words echoed in Julie's 
mind. She realized that, while brave little 
Patsy was fighting for her life, she — 
grown-up Julie Palmer — had been ready 
to give up, had almost lost the courage 
to fight for the life of Twin Oaks. A light 
came into Julie's eyes as she vowed: "To- 
morrow, I will go to the Carver Founda- 
tion and beg them to continue their sup- 
port of Twin Oaks. As surely as Patsy 
will live, I will convince them. I know I 
will." Moving closer to Dan, Julie felt more 
than ever, the wisdom of his words: There 
are times when we have to fight alone. 



The Doctor's Wife, NBC Radio, M-F, 10:30 A.M. EDT, stars Patricia Wheel and John Baragrey (see 
facing page) in the roles of Julie and Dan Palmer, with Donald Buka (standing) as Fred Conrad. 



At home with young Timmy, her husband 
Dan, and Fred Conrad, Julie Palnner knows 
that, somehow. Twin Oaks must be saved. 



44 



;f4 





■ ■■■■III iiiiiii mill 1 HIM 


IB 1 1 llllilllll 


"' "" 




wp^m 


mmm 






\ 



^ i^':ii 



The Colmaiis of IVY 




Ronald and Benita are very like 
Toddy and Vicky Hall — except that 
they have a child all their own 

By BUD GOODE 

As EVERY TV WATCHER can See, The Halls of Ivy — ^better 
known as "Toddy" and "Vicky" HaU to both 
Ivy College and their nationwide audience — ^are quite 
extraordinary people. Dr. William Todhunter Hall is the 
only coUege president currently starring in a popular 
situation-comedy series. Victoria Hall is the only college 
president's vdf e who was once a reigning beUe of the 
British theater. And, aside from these distinctions, 
the Halls are also extraordinarily wise, extraordinarily 
witty, and extremely charming people to know. 

This state of affairs is no surprise to anyone who's ever 
met the Colmans of Hollywood — ^Ronald and Benita Hume 
Colman, who play the Halls of Ivy. The Colmans are also 
wise, witty and very, very charming. And nothing 
about them is ordinary. The way Ronnie and Benita live, 
work and play — ^their every attitude — ^is marked by 
a certain "uniqueness" which is the key to their 
combined personalities. {Continued on page 69) 



The Halls Of Ivy — Toddy and Vicky — have 
only their students as "children" on TV. But 
the Colmans of Hollywood — Ronnie and Be- 
nita — have a ten-year-old daughter, Juliet! 





Toddy and Vicky at Ivy College (above, left) have nnuch in 
common with Ronnie and Benita in real life (above, right). 
At far left, Benita chooses the clothes for Vicky to wear. 



The Colmans star in The Halls Of Ivy, seen on CBS-TV, Tues., 8:30 P.M. EDT, 
sponsored alternately by the Interniational Harvester Co. and National Biscuit Co. 









ITN 



- ^ 





^mmfSeJt 





Left: That was quite » 



That's why Paul Dixon came back to Ohio, to the 

wonderful town Marge and Pam and Greg always call "home" 



48 



""""^'^ •~!mis .1 




^ iissiiyy' 




3use they had in the East, but Pom kept asking when they were "going home." So they piled into the cor — and bock they went. 



By HELEN BOLSTAD 



IN BROADCASTING, the road to fame and fortune 
inevitably runs from west to east — or to the 
far, far west. The ambitious head for New 
York or Hollywood. And, when a performer 
at the peak of popularity reverses the direction 
and leaves the show-business capitals, it is 
"man-bites-dog" kind of news. 

Yet Paul Dixon was doing it. Within six 
months of his New York welcome, and in spite 
of an impressive competitive rating, he was 
leaving the network. He announced he would 
return to Cincinnati and transfer his show to 
the three-station Crosley hookup in Ohio. 

Why? Paul had a three-word answer: "Marge, 
Pam, Greg." 

With the contented look of a man who has 
settled a major problem and is pleased with his 
decision, Paul leaned back in his chair and 
contemplated surroimdings which were 
virtually a symbol of what he was giving up. 

We were liinching in a fashionable restaurant 
in New York's swank East Sixties. The carpets 
were deep, the draperies rich, the view of an 
expensively spacious terrace was charming. 
The waiters were quietly attentive and you covild 
get a good beef stew — ^if you were sufficiently 
bilingual to order it in French. 

Yet the opulence was (Continued on page 79) 

The Paul Dixon Show is now seen over the Crosley Broad- 
casting Corp. Stations, WLW-T (Cincinnati), WLW-D 
(Dayton), WLW-C (Columbus)— M-F, 3 to 4 P.M. EDT. 




Pocking and unpacking seenned like endless chores tb Paul and 
Marge, Pam and Greg. But, this spring, it meant good news — 
for the Dixons themselves and for all their friends in the Midwest. 



49 



rw«*«^^^ 



48 





^/m^^€^^ 





I 



Left: That was quite o 



That's why Paul Dixon came back to Ohio, to the 

wonderful town Marge and Pam and Greg always call "home" 



48 



house they had in the East, but Pam kept asking when they were "going home." So they piled into the cai 



By HELEN BOLSTAD 



IN BROADCASTING, the Toad to fame and fortune 
inevitably runs from west to east — or to the 
far, far west. The ambitious head for New 
York or Hollywood. And, when a performer 
at the peak of popularity reverses the direction 
and leaves the show-business capitals, it is 
"man-bites-dog" kind of news. 

Yet Paul Dixon was doing it. Within six 
months of his New York welcome, and in spite 
of an impressive competitive rating, he was 
leaving the network. He announced he would 
return to Cincinnati and transfer his show to 
the three-station Crosley hookup in Ohio. 

Why? Paul had a three-word answer: "Marge, 
Pam, Greg." 

With the contented look of a man who has 
settled a major problem and is pleased with his 
decision, Paul leaned back in his chair and 
contemplated surroundings which were 
virtually a symbol of what he was giving up. 

We were lunching in a fashionable restaiurant 
in New York's swank East Sixties. The carpets 
were deep, the draperies rich, the view of an 
expensively spacious terrace was charming. 
The waiters were quietly attentive and you could 
get a good beef stew — if you were sufficiently 
bilingual to order it in French. 

Yet the opulence was (Continued on page 79) 

The Paul Dixon Show is now seen over the Crosley Broad- 
casting Corp. Stations, WLW-T (Cincinnati), WLW-D 
(Dayton), WLW-C (Columbus)— M-F, 3 to 4 P.M. EDT. 




Packing and unpacking seemed like endless chores tb Poul and 
Marge, Pam and Greg. But, this spring, it meant good news— 
for the Dixons themselves and tor all their friends in the Midwest. 



49 







^ ^^ 









HER LIFE IS A 





Three happy notes from Betty's present doy: Left, Robert Q. 
Lewis makes Betty on ofRcial member of the Lewis troupe — 
with o pair of "specs." Above, she looks at toys for sister 
Rosemary's son. Below, at home with her ever-helpful mother. 



Betty Clooney finds her place in 

the sun on the Rohert Q. Lewis shows 

and it's all simply "wonderful!" 




By FRANCES KISH 



There's always been a special kind of radiance 
about those singing Clooney sisters, Rosemary and 
Betty. But there's a very special kind of radiance 
about Betty Clooney these days, now that she's singing 
on Robert Q. Lewis's lively shows over CBS-TV and 
CBS Radio. It puts a light in her big dark eyes, which 
seem more a Latin heritage than a gift from her Irish 
foi^bears (but sure and 'twas the GuUfoyles on her 



mother's side and the Clooneys on her dad's, and what 
could be more Ould Sod than these?). It puts a gleam 
on the masses of thick, dark Kair, and on the five feet, 
four inches and 110 pounds packed with energy. 

"I'm happy," Betty says, as if that should explain 
everything. "Happier than I have ever been in my 
twenty-four years. Even though I am doing more than 
I ever did before. Working (Continued on page 86) 



The Robert Q. Lewis Shows — seen on CBS-TV, M-F, 2 P.M. EDT, as sponsored by Helene Curtis Industries (Spray Net, Lanolin Discovery, 
Shampoo Plus Egg), Miles Laboratories (Alka-Seltzer), General Mills (0-Cel-O Sponges, other products), Johnson's Wax, Mazola, Viceroy 
Cigarettes, and others — and heard on CBS Radio, Sat., 11 A.M. EDT, as sponsored by Pine-Sol, Perma-Starch, S-7, and other products. 



51 




Flora CampbelTs proud 
to portray such a valiant 
woman as Helen Emerson. 
That's one of man/, 
many reasons why Flora is 




Harmony is the keynote of Flora's own 
home life. Her husband is Ben Cutler, of 
society-orchestra fame, and both Tommy, 
14, and Creel, 5, love music as well as 
outdoor sports and other family projects. 



A VERY LUCKY LADY 



By MARY TEMPLE 



IF YOTJ walk down a certain elm-shaded 
street in a pleasant Connecticut town on 
a sxunmer evening, your feet may start 
to shuffle to the sound of orchestral music. 
Following the trail of melody, you might 
find yourself in the living room of a 
converted carriage house — a house painted 
bam red on the outside, cheery and homey 
inside, with the lampUght highlighting 
a family musicale. 

Standing close to the piano, where 
fourteen-year-old Tommy presides, will 
be Flora Campbell Cutler, playing her 
violin as if she had never deserted it for 
an acting career and starring role as 
Helen Emerson in television's daytime drama. 
Valiant Lady. Ben Cutler, a society- 
orchestra leader by profession, will be 
doubling on the sax and trombone, 
and their five-year-old daughter Creel 
blowing a miniature horn — or forsaking 
it suddenly to do a twirl on her toes. 

Creel will start to hvmi a Httle tune and 
Ben's rich operatic baritone will join her, 
filling the high-vaulted room, while Flo and 
Tommy join in. The neighbors will confirm 
that this is the way the Cutlers like 
to spend many an evening together. Even 
Fanny, the pet French poodle, is 
always ready to add a few well-pitched 
barks when the family music begins. 

Flo, known on TV by her maiden name 
of Flora Campbell, is a slender five-foot 
six and one-half inches. Her eyes are blue 
and kind and direct, her features well- 
drawn, her burnished brownish hair simply 
arranged, her manner gracious and 
outgoing. Ben is darker, a half-inch over 
six feet, a handsome, friendly man 
who likes his work and his life. The kids are 
blond, Tonuny favoring his mother in looks 
and Creel beginning to look more like Ben. 
Tom is wrapped up in sports and the Boy 
Scouts at the moment, and is learning to do 
a real rock 'n' roU on the drtims. 

Creel thinks she might hke to be an actress, 
on television. She has been watching 
Bonnie Sawyer, the little girl who plays 

Continued k. 




The Cutlers live in a converted carriage house, and 
are turning the back yard Into a garden and playground. 



53 




A VERY LUCKY LADY 



{Continued) 




Ben and Flora ore never too busy for fun and games 
with little Creel and not-so-little tonnmy — who, in nnid- 
teens, is getting taller than his handsome, six-foot dad! 




Kim on ValiantLady, and can't quite tinderstand why 
she can't be Kim, too — although she loves Bonnie 
dearly and knows she is only Flora's "pretend" daugh- 
ter on the program. Creel even mimics some of Kitn's 
lines, to prove to her mother, when she comes home 
after a show, that she herself is prepared to go before 
the cameras immediately! 

The Cutlers are still working on their house, which 
they moved into the Christmas before last. Their big 
project this summer is the large back yard, which 
forms a pretty panorama from the picture window in 
the living room. When they moved in, this was noth- 
ing but mud and weeds, but gradually they are turn- 
ing it into green lawn and gardens, with a corner 
dedicated to batting tennis balls around and for base- 
ball and football practice by the men of the family. 
There is a barbecue for cook- outs and a terrace for 
outdoor eating. 

The Cutlers used to live in an old farmhouse with 
a small living room, so this new, huge cathedral- 
roofed living room, once housing old family carriages, 
is their great pride. The fireplace of rough native 
stone is in an inglenook, flanked by twin modern 
sofas. There is a long, bright red couch in the main 
part of the room and there are many comfortable 
chairs and convenient lamps, and a harmony of 
color which starts with the soft yellow-green of the 
walls, is picked up in the rich fabric of the drapes, 
where it is mingled with bits of red and gold and 
other flecks of color, and set off by neutral shades in 
the carpeting. 

The bedrooms reflect the tastes of their occupants. 
Creel has a dainty, Hght blue room. Tommy's is typical 
of an athletic teen-age boy, right to the sports wall- 
paper and the solid-looking furniture and all the 
pennants and paraphernalia that a fellow needs when 
he goes out for most of the teams. 

The kitchen is large and bright and much-used in 
this home -loving family, and the den is comfortable 
and quietly inviting. There is a competent maid who 
takes over, except on the days Flo is home. Some- 
times, on a Saturday, Flo will let the dishes pile up 
after breakfast and lunch so she can take care of some 
of the outside chores which come with home-owning. 
Ben will be out working at night, with one of his 
orchestras. Tommy off with his friends, and Creel in 
bed, and suddenly- there wiU be all those dishes from 
three meals — ^waiting to be washed and put away — 
while there are a couple of TV programs she is simply 
dying to see. "It's my own fault, when that happens," 
she sighs. "Later on, I can watch. Or read. I love to 
read, and do as much of it as I can." 

The family has to do without Daddy frequently 
on weekends when his orchestras (sometimes as many 
as ten at a time with from three to twenty or twenty- 
five musicians) are much in demand. That's when Flo 
spends as much time as possible with the children and 
catches up on all the home (Continued on page 84) 



Flora Campbell is Helen Emerson in Valiant Lady, CBS-TV, 
M-F, 12 noon EDT, for General Mills and The Toni Co. 



U-IMII iQi 




It's o musical, multi-instrument family — and even Creel toots a mean horn, though her specialty is dancing. 



55 




Steve Allen presents two stellar singers on Tonight — Eydie Gorme and Steve Lawrence. 

JLoung Eydie Gorme s having a hall as Tonight's Cinderella, 

but where is tomorrow's Prince Charming? 



56 



Js3«**i3>(,*M' 




Papa Gorme relaxes happily, as 
Eydie rehearses a song at home. 



Eydie catches up on fan mail, 
while listening to a recording. 



Mama Gorme pours coffee for 
Ken Greengrass (back to camera). 




Sorry, no date — Eydie has an out- 
of-town booking this weekend. 



Quick goodbye kiss from Mama, 
then Eydie dashes for her plane. 



Ken — Eydie s manager — helps to 
carry her luggage to the airport. 



Bv PHILIP CHAPMAN 



Tonight's singing star, Eydie Goi-me, is more than a 
young, dark-haired girl with a smile and a singing 
voice that have a peculiar charm all their own. She's 
a shining example of today's TV business and its frantic 
pace — a lovely, warm, human girl who would like a hus- 
band, children, a home of her own — and who just doesn't 
have time to fall in love, now that her talents are finding 
nationwide recognition. 

It was about a year ago that Eydie did a song for Coral 
Records called 'Trenesi." Up iintil that time, she had 



been a hard-working, fairly successful singer with popular 
bands such as Tex Beneke's, and she'd been doing a lot 
of night-club dates in New York and around the country. 
What Eydie Gorme had, she'd fought for, as all aspiring 
young performers must fight. And then the great, un- 
expected break that such hopefuls pray for — and secretly 
wonder if they will ever get — came to Eydie. 

Steve Allen walked into the offices of Coral Records 
one afternoon and, after a couple of hours there, realized 
that from somewhere among the (Continued on page 91) 



Eydie Gorme sing? on Tonight, NBC-TV, M-F, 11:30 P.M. EDT, 11 P.M. CDT, under participating sponsorship, and The Steve 
Allen Show, as seen over Station WRCA-TV (New York). M-F, 11:15 P.M. EDT, sponsored by Knickerbocker Beer. 



57 



THE ROAD OF LIFE 



Jim and Jocelyn Brent pray that their love 
can bridge the forces working to separate them 



TIME and distance, as scientists have proved, are 
relative. And from Merrimac to the island of 
Jamaica is only eight hours by air. Jocelyn Brent, 
in her new job with a Caribbean airline, watches the 
planes wing in and out, knowing that in just a few 
short hours they will land in the United States. . . . 
These planes are barred to Jocelyn, who was deported 
because of an oversight in her papers when she first 
arrived in the United States — and because of a tech- 
nical conviction for kidnaping after an innocent after- 
noon's outing with Sibyl Overton Fuller's child. The 
time and distance between Jocelyn and her home in 
Merrimac, her husband, Dr. Jim Brent, and her step- 
daughter, Janie, seem like a void that grows wider 
and wider with each passing day. ... At first, when 
Sibyl had instigated the deportation proceedings 
against her, Jocelyn and Jim had thought Sibyl could 
be tricked into betraying her part in the hoax which 
had led to Jocelyn's kidnaping conviction. Sibyl's mo- 
tives were clear: She hoped to separate Jim and Joc- 
elyn and to win Jim for herself. ... In order to un- 
mask Sibyl, Jim had begun to pay her the attentions 
she had long coveted. Jocelyn in turn had encouraged 
Armand Monet's strong attraction to her, believing 
that he knew Sibyl's secret and could help prevent 
the deportation. Yet, both Jim's and Jocelyn's efforts 
had come to nothing. . . . Several incidents had 
prompted Jim and Jocelyn to suspect that Jim's con- 
tinued presence in Merrimac — and his continued at- 
tentions to Sibyl — might soon reveal her secret. There- 
fore, Jocelyn had urged Jim to stick with his promis- 
ing medical career while she took up what she hopes 
will be temporary residence in Jamaica. . . . Yet 
Jocelyn knows that Sibyl — whose desire for Jim 
amounts to an obsession — is nevertheless an attractive, 
strong-willed woman. Jocelyn cannot help but feel 
the danger to her marriage increases in the time Jim 
and Sibyl spend together. ... In their separation, 
Jocelyn has kept her first important secret from Jim. 
She is to bear him a child, but has said nothing — will 
say nothing — until it is certain that they are to be 
together again. . . . Meanwhile, Jocelyn yearns for her 
family back in Merrimac and is forced to face the 
knowledge that, in her absence, Aunt Reggie is work- 



ing to usurp her place in the lives of Janie and Jim. . . . 
Well-meaning but lonely. Aunt Reggie has nobody of 
her own whose life she can regtilate and dominate. 
Yet she has very definite ideas as to what is best for 
other people. Now she has determined that it would 
be "all for the best" for Janie to forget Jocelyn and 
accept herself as a substitute mother. . . . Jim Brent 
is brought face-to-face with this problem when he 
comes upon Aunt Reggie as she is about to remove 
Jocelyn's picture from its place in their home. Aunt 
Reggie protests that it is wrong for the child to be 
constantly reminded of the mother who is so far away. 
. . . Even as Jim pleads with her not to tamper with 
the love that Janie bears for Jocelyn, he must realize 
that Aunt Reggie's influence is subtle and insistent. 
Amid the pain of his separation from Jocelyn and the 
maddening demands made upon him by Sibyl, Jim 
must also find a way to keep Aunt Reggie from in- 
sinuating herself in the place which rightfully belongs 
to Jocelyn. . . . Jim knows Sibyl is "sick," that her 
mind may even one day become unbalanced. She has 
lied to herself for so long about the possibility of a 
marriage between herself and Jim that now Sibyl can 
only preserve her sanity by persisting in these lies. 
Each day, her demands on Jim grow, as she convinces 
herself that now Jim will divorce Jocelyn. Sibyl half- 
longs, half -fears to force the issue, to propel Jim into 
declaring that he shares her love, and into setting an 
actual date for a ' divorce. ... At the same time, in 
Jamaica, Jocelyn sees the tragic consequences of her 
friendship with Armand Monet. Restless and un- 
happy, Armand had fallen in love with Jocelyn dur- 
ing the days when she had accepted his admiration in 
the hope that he might help prevent her deportation. 
Now Armand impulsively walks out on a three- 
million-dollar musical because it seems that filming 
delays might keep him from seeing Jocelyn for many 
months. Despite the protests of Mooch, a hanger-on 
who practically lives off Armand, and despite the 
phone calls and letters in which Jocelyn insists she 
doesn't love him, Armand flies to Jamaica. Feeling 
responsible for Armand's unhappiness and for the sac- 
rifice of his career, Jocelyn cannot simply refuse to 
see him. Instead, she continues to insist that she does 



58 




I. When Jim finds Aunt Reggie about to hide Jocelyn's picture, she protests that young Janie and 
Jim are unhappily renninded of the absence of Jocelyn, who has been deported to Jamaica. 
Yet Jim cannot help but realize how far Aunt Reggie will go to replace Jocelyn In young Janle's life. 



See Next Page- 



59 



THE ROAD OF LIFE 

( Continued ) 




2. Despite Mooch's pleadings, and Jocelyn's letters say- 
ing that she does not return his love, Armand Monet 
forsakes his career to follow Jocelyn to Jamaica. 



not love him. and makes every effort to turn his love 
toward his estranged wife, Lil. . . . Meanwhile, Jim 
flies to Jamaica, too, having learned about the baby 
Jocelyn expects. But, when he asks why Jocelyn had 
kept this a secret from him, she cannot explain the 
fears which made her want to wait until they were 
once again together — in Merrimac. . . . As she and 



Pictured here, as heard on the air, are: 

Dr. Jim Brent Don MacLaughlin 

Jocelyn Brent Virginia Dwyer 

Sibyl Overton Fuller Barbara Becker 

Aunt Reggie Dorothy Sands 

Armand Monet Michael Kane 

Mooch Frank Behrens 

The Road Of Life, CBS Radio, 1 P.M. EOT, CBS-TV, 1:15 P.M., 
M-F, for Ivory Soap, Spic 'n Span, Crisco, Drene, Ivory Flakes. 




3. Sibyl has deceived herself about Jim for so long that 
now, as she tries to get him to say that he loves her and 
will divorce Jocelyn, she half-fears forcing the issue. 



Jim share a few precious hours on this exotic Carib- 
bean isFand, Jocelyn wonders when that day will come 
— whether it will ever come. Jim stifles her doubts but 
he, too, wonders how long their separation will drag 
on. He also wonders about the problems that will still 
exist when Jocelyn returns — the continued schemings 
of Sibyl; Aunt Reggie's growing influence on young 
Janie's life; and even the difficulties that come 
hand-in-hand with the rewarding joys of Jocelyn's 
pregnancy. As Jim returns to Merrimac and Jocelyn 
stays behind, both wonder how far each must travel 
before the road of life brings them together again. 



60 



X»*%v^AIk' ♦ J.SSd: 1-' 




4. When Jim learns at last that Jocelyn is to bear him a child, he flies to Jamaica, hie cannot understand why 
she has kept this a secret, but Jocelyn had wanted to wait until they were once again together — in Merrimac. 
Both wonder when this will be — and whether the forces keeping them apart will be a challenge even then. 



61 



THE ROAD OF LIFE 



i Continued 1 




2. Despite Mooch's pleadings, and Jocelyn's letters say- 
ing that she does not return his love, Armond Monet 
forsakes his career to follow Jocelyn to Jamaica. 



not love him and makes every effort to turn his love 
toward his estranged wife, Lil. . . . Meanwhile, Jim 
flies to Jamaica, too, having learned about the baby 
Jocelyn expects. But, when he asks why Jocelyn had 
kept this a secret from him, she cannot explain the 
fears which made her want to wait until they were 
once again together — in Merrimac. ... As she and 



Pictured here* as heard on the air, are: 

Dr. Jim Brent Don MacLaughlin 

Jocelyn Brent Virginia Dwyer 

Sibyl Overton Fuller Barbara Becker 

Aunt Reggie Dorothy Sands 

Armand Monet Michael Kane 

Mooch Frank Behrens 

The Road Of life, CBS Radio, 1 P.M. EDT, CBS-TV, 1 :15 P.M., 
M-F, for Ivory Soap, Spic 'n Span, Crisco, Drene, Ivory Flakes! 




3. Sibyl has deceived herself about Jim for so long that 
now, as she tries to get him to say that he loves her and 
will divorce Jocelyn, she half-fears forcing the issue. 



Jim share a few precious hours on this exotic Carib- 
bean island, Jocelyn wonders when that day will come 
—whether it will ever come. Jim stifles her doubts but 
he, too, wonders how long their separation will drag 
on. He also wonders about the problems that will still 
exist when Jocelyn returns-— the continued schemings 
of Sibyl; Aunt Reggie's growing influence on young 
Janie's life; and even the difficulties that come 
hand-in-hand with the rewarding joys of Jocelyn s 
pregnancy. As Jim returns to Merrimac and Jocelyn 
stays behind, both wonder how far each must travel 
before the road of life brings them together again. 



60 




4. When Jim learns at last that Jocelyn is to bear him a child, he flies to Jamaica. He cannot understand why 
she has kept this a secret, but Jocelyn had wanted to wait until they were once again together— in Merrimac. 
Both wonder when this will 



be and whether the forces keeping them apart will be a challenge even then. 



61 



Those Whiting Girts! 



I 






♦^ 



^ 



e 



''■•*w 



o 



» 







^■^ 



II 



vfi 




I i 





Like oil sisters, they borrow each other's clothes and kid on the phone — but they cook spaghetti for breakfast! 



Life with Margaret and Barbara is 
a ride on a merry-go-round, but the 
ring of sisterly love is pure gold 

By FREDDA DUDLEY BALLING 




Left, Barbara joins in, as Margaret "practices." 
Above, their nnother ploys, too. At right, Margaret's 
daughter Debbie is obviously queen of the household. 



BY THE TIME you read this, it will be 
possible for you to pull up your chair 
before yovir TV set on Monday night 
and laugh at the zaniest pair of sisters 
your eyes and ears have ever feasted on. 
Their surname is Whiting and their program, 
Those Whiting Girls, came about as 
naturally as a sneeze: Pepper was wafted 
upon the air. A friend, recipient of the 
"pepper," dropped in upon the Whitings on 
a routine day, listened, compressed his ribs, 
and announced from the top of the nearest 
hill that the nsters, Margaret and Barbara, 
could live a truly hilarious TV show. "More 
whimsy than Disneyland, more speed than 
Winchell," was part of his sales pitch. 

After an almost imperceptible interval, 
two writers were ensconced in the 
Whiting guest {Continued on page 75) 



Those Whiting Girls, CBS-TV, Mon., 9 P.M. EDT, is 
sponsored by General Foods and Procter & Gamble. 







63 



^•^tW*^ 



RALPH PAUL 

To THE millions of Strike It Rich listeners and 
viewers throughout America, Ralph Paul's warm 
voice is as familiar as an old friend's. Ralph himself 
is an old friend of radio, having spent half his life 
announcing, starting from the time he was sixteen. 
Born in Denver, Colorado, he worked at his home- 
town station, KVOO, and at the same time was a 
brilliant student at the University of Denver. That 
was during World War II, and Ralph had only one 
semester to go when he enlisted in the Army. Never- 
theless, he squeezed in four special courses, acquired 
the necessary amount of points to graduate — and re- 
ceived a Phi Beta Kappa key. After his discharge in 
1945, Ralph became a "rolling stone," announcing in 
cities from El Paso, Texas, to Baltimore, Maryland. 
When he reached New York, he landed a job as stafif 
announcer with local Station WOR. Before long, 
however, Ralph decided there wasn't too much future 
in being a stafT man, so he became a free-lancer, 
appearing on such programs as The Aldrich Family 
and Robert Trout And The News. He "struck it 
rich" in 1948 and has enjoyed his successful stay 
with the show ever since. Now, Ralph makes his 
home in Greenwich, Connecticut, along with many 
other TV personalities. Married to his childhood 
sweetheart, he and his wife Betty Jane have two 
lively young children, Marty and Susie. 








Spotlight oh 




JACK LESCOULIE 

HAVING worked both on and behind the scenes in show busi- 
ness since he was 7 and made his vaudeville debut. Jack 
Lescoulie now faces the TV cameras with complete confidence, 
ease and sincerity. Although today his big smile and suave 
voice are familiar to millions who have watched Today, The 
Buick-Berle Show, and The Jackie Gleason Show, Jack hasn't 
forgotten his struggles in getting to the top. Born in Sacra- 
mento, California, Jack finished high school, then became an 
announcer at Station KGFJ in Los Angeles. After spending 
three days and nights covering the Long Beach Earthquakes 
of 1931, he decided to return to school. He joined Los Angeles 
City College, then the Pasadena Playhouse, after which he 
landed a job in "Achilles Had a Heel," with Walter Hampden. 
His role? The off-stage voice of an elephant. When the show 
played in New York, it lasted but seven performances, and 
Jack found himself broke and alone in the big city. To keep 
from starving, he delivered clothes for a cleaner, was a soda 
jerk, had a few small parts in Broadway plays, then decided 
to return to Los Angeles. There he joined NBC and created 
The Grouch Cluh. World War II found him in the Air Force 
as a combat reporter in Italy. Returning to New York after 
his discharge, Jack teamed up with Gene Rayburn and was 
heard over local Station WNEW. In 1950, Jack moved to CBS 
to become a TV producer, then associate program director. 
When Today debuted in 1952, Jack was a part of the show. 
Since then, success has been his byword. Jack lives with his 
wife Birdie and their two-year-old daughter Linda Ann, on 
Long Island. For pleasure, he says, "I shoot a miserable game 
of goK, which I dearly love, and I'm a pretty good horseback 
rider — but I never do that any more." 




Who's Who in Radio and TV 



JULIA MEADE 

A NATIVE New Yorker, lovely Julia Meade was 
born while her mother — a Shakespearean act- 
ress — was in Boston. When she was ten, her family 
moved to Ridgewood, New Jersey. There, as a high 
school student, Julia showed early show-business 
promise by winning a' recitation contest two years in 
a row — once with a selection from "The Taming of 
the Shrew"; the second time with "something from 
'Cyrano' " — and appearing in the senior class play. 
Diploma in hand, Juha headed for the Yale Drama 
School. Although this famous school is for graduate 
work, Julia was accepted after passing the entrance 
exam. After completing her studies, she spent sev- 
eral years as a TV actress, then received an offer to 
join Ed SuUivan's Toast Of The Town. At first she 
turned it down, but, a while later, she reconsidered 
and. decided to try it — ^just once. She's still there, and 
happily so. "I love the show and I love Ed," Julia 
says. "He introduces me as though I were one of his 
big acts." Also familiar to viewers of Your Hit Pa- 
rade, Julia has not given up acting entirely. Last sea- 
son she appeared on Broadway in "The Tender 
Trap," and hopes to do another play soon. Married to 
Worsham Judd, a commercial artist, Julia and her 
husband share their Manhattan apartment with two 
cats. In addition to making home movies, she loves 
to cook and "adores" the Yankee baseball team. 



Announcers 



REX MARSHALL 

IIFE, for handsome Rex Marshall, has been a series of 
I gambles — some good, some not so good. Bom in James- 
town, New York, the thirty-six-year-old announcer has had 
broadcasting in his blood since he was a young lad and worked 
for small and medium-sized stations throughout the East. 
After establishing himself in Boston as a capable announcer- 
salesman-emcee. Rex decided to try his luck in New York. 
After a series of menial jobs, none of which were in broadcast- 
ing, he returned to small stations. A few more years of de- 
veloping his talent and stature on local stations, and Rex was 
again ready to gamble on New York. Uncle Sam, however, 
detoured him, and he entered the Air Force. The day he won 
his wings, he also took his home-town sweetheart, Barbara, 
as his bride. After five years of war flying, during which he 
survived fovu- crack-ups. Rex resumed his "Invasion of New 
York Broadcasting" and finally landed an announcing job 
with the ABC network. Then, eyeing television in 1948, Rex 
took a chance and joined New York's Station WPIX before it 
even opened. Soon, he was on his way to the top, highUghting 
his stay at WPIX with his brilliant coverage of the 1948 
political conventions. Offers began pouring in, and Rex was 
hired to handle the commercials, and later served as narrator 
and host, on numerous leading network shows. Suspense, 
Ellery Queen, Mr. Peepers, are only a few of the programs 
on which his friendly face and manner have appealed to mil- 
lions. Often busy seven days a week. Rex still finds time to 
play some handball, go skeet shooting and make recordings 
for the blind. His happiest moments, however, are spent with 
his wife Barbara and their children —Pamela, 12, and Peter, 8 — 
at home in Greenwich, Connecticut. 




Ted Mack and his Matinee are dedicated to turning the spotlight on others- 




The Honey Dreamers got their musical start in college — and two of thena are now husband and wife. Left to right, 
the girls are Nan Green and Marion Bye (Mrs. Davis) — the boys, Bob Mitchell, Bob Davis, Stewart Vannerson. 




Such VIPs as Mrs. Dale Carnegie visit Ted's program to 
share their secrets of success with the Matinee audiences. 



PERSONAL MEMO to Ted Mack fans: After years 
of devoting himself to America's amateur 
talent, as emcee of the Original Amateur 
Hour, your Mr. Mack is now helping "undis- 
covered" professionals on this season's new 
daytime variety show, The Ted Mack Matinee, 
over NBC-TV. That's great news, for it means 
that ... if you are a young and talented 
performer, amateur or professional ... if you 
are young and talented in any art — or just 
young, and not quite sure what talent you may 
have . . . Ted Mack is your best friend. 

Most people in show business are generous 
with their time and money, public-spirited, wai'm 
of heart . . . but, when you find a performer 
who doesn't want to talk about himself, who 
can think of practically nothing to wish for 
himself, whose ambition is more for others than 
for himself . . . this is something new under 
that make-believe paper moon! For all his years 
on stage, before the camera, behind the mike, 
your Mr. Mack is that "something new." 

Because he is, it's very hard to get a story 
about Ted Mack himself. One recent afternoon, I 
sat in the audience at the Ambassador Theater 
in New York, watching the Ted Mack Matinee, 
enjoying the singing of Dick Lee, Elise Rhodes, 
the Honey Dreamers. Enjoying maestro Mack's 
enjoyment, too . . . taking note of the pleased 
and proud expression on his face a^ the audience 



66 



irid it might be you 





By GLADYS HALL 




Ted Mack couldn't be prouder of Elise 
Rhodes and Dick Lee if he were their dad! 





See Next Page ^ 



Q4wt^mm^^ mm^ 



{CanXvauzd.') 




Off-camera, Ted Mack would rather go riding than do 
almost anything else — particularly if his saddle-pal is 
that "wonderful Arabian horse, nay good friend Khidaan." 



applauded his talented yovmgsters ... liking the 
verbal pats-on-the-back he gave them when their 
songs were done. But when, after the Matinee, 
we repaired to his dressing room so that we might 
talk about veteran showman Mack himself — 
which was, after all, my purpose in being there 
— we didn't. That is, he didn't. 

He talked about the youngsters then appearing 
on his Matinee . . . about Dick Lee, his "Young 
Man of Song" who — ^Ted said happily — ^is rapidly 
becoming the No. 1 favorite of the nation's 
bobby-soxers. He told me that the twenty -four- 
year-old Lee was bom in Philadelphia, the 
son of a Police Department detective. Boxing 
had been the boy's first love, and his sturdy build 
and lightning reflexes soon made a mark in 
amateur contests. Dick also loved to listen to 
music, all kinds of music from be-bop to 
classical, and thus discovered — and soon was 
testing — his own voice. Still planning on a boxing 
career, however, Dick njade a successful start 
in the ring, was a Golden Gloves contender. But, 
when he fractured his nose in one of his bouts 
and his worried mother begged him to hang up 
the gloves, he decided to turn to his second 
love and become a singer. 

Dick Lee's first professional engagement was 
at a small night club in New Jersey, where he was 
such a smash hit he was held over for twenty-six 
consecutive weeks. Since then, he has won first 
honors on Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts, his 
recordings under the Essex label (among them, 
"Infatuation," "Eternally," "I Thought You 
Might Be Lonely") have become favorites with 
disc jockeys and listeners, and his personal 
appearances at night clubs (Continued on page 92) 




The Ted Mack Matinee is seen over the NBC-TV network, 
M-F, 3 to 3:30 P.M. EDT, under participating sponsorship. 



The Macks live quietly, and Ted spends most of his 
rare leisure hours catching up on the newspapers and 
other reading — or playing an occasional round of golf. 



68 




IT 
it 



J— SI 



The Colmans of Ivy 

(Continued from page 46) 
Dr. and Mrs. Hall never make sensa- 
tional headlines in the newspapers. 
Neither do Mr. and Mrs. CoLman. Despite 
their long and distinguished careers in 
movies, radio and television, Ronnie and 
Benita have never been "good copy" for 
the gossip columns. Their attitude toward 
publicity about their private lives is just 
what one would expect from Toddy and 
Vicky themselves. As Benita sums it up, 
succinctly: "I'm sure the high life in the 
~ eadlines is stimulating, but I doubt if it 
is nourishing!" 

In Hollywood, this is a unique attitude 
indeed. But even the Colmans' show is 
ique. The Halls Of Ivy might best be 
escribed as "sparkling entertainment — 
ith a moral." It is one of the first tele- 
ision series, in a comic vein, to comment 
in the structure and foibles of our society. 
The TV Hails Of Ivy evolved naturally 
om their Peabody Award-winning radio 
eries, brainchild of writer Don Quinn. 
ked about the Cobnans' own contribu- 
on to the show's development, Benita 
ys: "It has been very much 'the three 
egs on one stool,' with Don Quinn, Ron- 
[nie and myself, because many of the shows 
" ave developed from incidents that have 
happened to Ronnie and me. The episode 
we call 'Traffic and Cocoanuts' is an exam- 
ple. That's the one in which Victoria gets 
into trouble over fovir traffic tickets. I was 
the one who was what might be called the 
'inspiration' for that! Need I say more?" 



IS a family, the Colmans are unique in 
fthe fact that their ten-year-old daughter, 
[Juliet, is not included in the show. In fact, 
[Vicky and Toddy Hall have no children. 
"Juliet is doing her best to get in, how- 
lever," Benita laughs. "She keeps saying, T 
[don't see why you haven't got a child!' " 

But the near future looks bleak for 
I Juliet, in that respect — even if the Ivy 
^script should miraculously produce a child 
for the Halls overnight — for the Colmans 
think school is a much better place for 
Juliet, just now, than a TV studio. "I don't 
beUeve Juliet would think much of it," 
says her mother, "if she had to stay on the 
set some eight hours out of each day." 

Ronnie and Benita have found that TV 
demands five times as much time as their 
one-day-a-week radio show. "It takes a 
lot more of getting up early," Benita ex- 
plains, "and learning and all that sort of 
thing. It is absolutely a 24-hour project. 
We get up at half-past six, arrive home at 
seven that night, and are in bed by nine. 
That is the story of our lives at the mo- 
ment." 

However, though the hours are hard, 
Benita says the work itself is not. "It's 
very gay on the set. We have a lot of fun." 
As for working together, the Colmans en- 
joy it very much. "Nobody," she adds, 
"blacks anybody's eyes here!" 

There is a very definite Colman touch to 
their lunch hour, too. Harry, a sort of 
handyman around the Colman household 
for nearly sixteen years now, prepares a 
substantial box lunch which has been or- 
dered by Benita. This she lays out in her 
dressing room, and then the meal is shared 
by their producer. Bill Frye, and their di- 
rector — either Norman McLeod or Wil- 
Ham Cameron Menzies. According to 
Benita, such a lunch, without all the time- 
consxmiing elements of a restaurant, is 
very functional. "We can," she says, "spend 
the time running lines or discussing the 
action. It makes it easier when you are 
so terribly short of time." 

The Colmans' home is in San Ysidro, 
near Santa Barbara, California. While 
working in Hollywood, they live in an 
apartment. Juliet, who goes to school in 





Is there an air of freshness 
about you . . . always? 



All summer, every day, you're 
confident, certain of your freshness— 
when you use Fresh Cream Deodorant. 

Your Underarms are dry .. .stay dry! 
There's not a trace of odor. No worry 
about staining lovely clothes. Why? 

Fresh contains the most effective 
perspiration-checking ingredient known. 

Fresh has a wonderful freshness 
all its own. A delicate clear fragrance. 
A pure whiteness. A whipped cream 
smoothness. It's never sticky . . . never 
greasy — always gentle to skin. 

For an air of freshness use Fresh every 
day. You can't help but be lovely to love. 





fA^ contains the most effective 
perspiration-checking ingredient known. 



a fJlJlAh gi^l is alwa ys lovely to love 

f/^lCAO is a registered trademark of Pharma-Craft Corporation. Also manufactured and distributed in Canada. 



69 



Santa Barbara, spends every other week- 
end with them in Hollywood. And, every 
ten days, they go to Santa Barbara for 
four days of relaxation. 

Asked how she feels about the separa- 
tion from Juliet, Benita says: "We miss 
her like mad, of course. We talk on the 
phone a lot — and we do go up every ten 
days." She definitely does not think that 
their absence hurts their relationship with 
their child. "When we are together," she 
says, "we are together all the time. I think 
that makes up for a few days' separation." 

The most unique thing about the Col- 
mans is the manner in which they spend 
their four-day vacations on their San 
Ysidro ranch. As Benita describes it: "We 
lie prone — or is it supine? — I never know. 
Anyway, we lie about in little heaps like 
uncounted laundry, waiting for time to put 
the starch in us again. 

"Actually, we have piles of books in the 
back of the car, and everything at the 
ranch is set to receive us. The fireplace is 



burning, the record machine is waiting — 
and Juliet is playing the piano. At the mo- 
ment, she is long on enthusiasm and short 
on repertoire. I play the piano myself, and 
we sometimes have very hot duets going. 

"We are extremely 'occupied' people," 
Benita continues. "We have no trouble in 
taking care of our time. Ronnie likes to 
paint. He paints rather well, though he's 
apt to complain a bit. 'The light's not right,' 
he'll say, or 'The color's bad,' or 'The per- 
spective is a problem.' Yet his landscapes 
and flowers are truly charming. I don't 
know his 'sale value,' because nobody has 
really made a purchase yet. However," she 
adds, smiling, "I understand Juliet has 
opened negotiations for a still-life. The 
last I heard was a good deal of haggling in 
the neighborhood of seventy-five cents." 

As for Benita's own artistic endeavors, 
she reports: "Painting is a nice absorbing 
occupation. That is why I took up sculp- 
ture. Everybody was painting, so I thought 
I'd go off on a branch of my own. It turned 



out to be exceedingly unwieldy, because— 
once you've made something — you can't 
take it anywhere. It is awful. And then," 
she adds wickedly, "all those naked mod- 
els are so impractical for the average 
household and are apt to give the casual 
caller quite a turn! I finally had a piece of 
mine carted up from Hollywood to Santa 
Barbara. It arrived cracked all over. But I 
think it is improved. The rough treatment 
lent it a slightly Pompeian air!" 

Yes, this life of the Colmans is the most 
unique thing about them. In fact, it's this 
very thing that they are so reluctant to 
talk about. But Benita has explained their 
feelings, their reasons for wanting to keep 
their private lives private, and logic agrees 
with her. It's only when she tells you just 
a little bit about this life together, that one 
gets more curious than ever. 

All in all, it's a simple yet completely 
charming existence. Perhaps it isn't too 
surprising that the Colmans want to keep 
it so much to themselves! 



With a Smile in His Voice 



(Continued from page 42) 
went their chairs, out came their auto- 
graph books, and the rush was on! 

Now, the friends who had gathered about 
the Smiths were Ralph and Barbara Ed- 
wards, and Bert and Annette Parks. The 
autograph-hunters, however, were only in- 
terested in Bert Parks — for the year was 
1950, and he was the only one who had 
yet appeared on TV. It didn't matter that 
Ralph Edwards and Jack Smith were two 
of America's top radio personalities. None 
of their countrymen recognized them. 
Ralph and Jack didn't say anything. There 
was no need. Each knew exactly what the 
other had seen. He had seen the hand- 
writing on the wall. . . . 

If this same meeting were to take place 
today, the autograph-hunters would have 
a field day, for Ralph Edwards is now host 
and emcee of NBC-TV's This Is Your Life, 
and Jack Smith is host and emcee of 
CBS-TV's new Welcome Travelers series. 
And, while it all started in Paris, success 
didn't come overnight — nor did it come 
easily. Ralph tried the first TV version of 
Truth Or Consequences, his long-popular 
radio show, before really coming into his 
ov.r"n with This Is Your Life. As for Jack — 
well, the story of his success would give 
Ralph a happy, heart-warming program, 
but you'll never see it dramatized on This 
Is Your Life. Ralph figures too import- 
antly in that story himself. . . . 

The most unusual thing, of course, about 
"The Jack Smith Story" is the name of the 
hero. "What's in a name?" Shakespeare 
asked, but he was thinking of roses — not 
entertainers. 

When it came to giving his children 
names, however. Major Walter Smith was 
scarcely concerned how they might sound 
on radio or television. "My father was a 
New Englander," Jack recalls, "descended 
from a long line of Smiths. And none 
of them had ever been actors." The Ma- 
jor himself was a former Annapolis man 
who had transferred to the Army. 

Jack was born at Fort Ward on Bain- 
bridge Island, Seattle, Washington — which 
explains why his middle name is Ward. 
"Dad didn't try too hard," Jack says with 
a fond smile. (He named his younger son 
Walter Reed Smith — and he, too, was to 
become a performer, dropping the Smith 
when he went to Hollywood.) 
^ When Jack was five, the Major moved 
y his family to Honolulu, where he was sta- 
f^ tioned for the next four years. Then, re- 
tiring from the Army and entering private 
business, he moved the family to Los 
Angeles. It was there, at Hollywood High 



School, when he was only fifteen-and-a- 
half, that Jack formed a trio which was to 
become "The Ambassadors," and a duo 
which was to become Mr. and Mrs. Jack 
Smith. But the first was easier to achieve 
than the second! 

"I always liked to sing," Jack recalls. 
"I was in the school glee club, and then I 
got together with two of my classmates 
to make up a trio. Well, in those days — 
if you were girls, you copied the Boswell 
Sisters. If you were boys, you copied 'The 
Rhythm Boys' — Harry Barris, Al Rinker, 
and Bing Crosby." 

The newly formed trio was lucky. The 
Rhythm Boys were appearing at Holly- 
wood's famous Cocoanut Grove. "We used 
to go nightly," Jack admits, "and copy 
their style. And, when they finished their 
engagement, we auditioned as their re- 
placement. We were young enough to have 
the nerve and, somehow, we got the job." 

They called themselves "The Ambassa- 
dors" because the Cocoanut Grove is in 
the Ambassador Hotel. (Jack's father, ap- 
parently, wasn't the only one who "didn't 
try too hard" when it came to names.) 
After six months at the Grove, singing 
with Gus Arnheim's band, the trio ac- 
cepted an engagement in San Francisco. 
Then Phil Harris asked them back to the 
Grove. When he took his band on tour, the 
next two years. The Ambassadors went 
along. 

That two years away from California 
turned out to be a blessing in disguise, for 
while he was away. Jack found that he 
was missing someone more than he an- 
ticipated — the soon-to-be Mrs. Jack Smith. 

Her name was Victoria Stuart, and she 
was fifty-five minutes younger than Jack. 
In fact, that coincidence of birth accounted 
for their meeting! Vickii's cousin was 
giving her a birthday party, and then de- 
cided it might as well be for Jack, too, 
since he was born on the same day — No- 
vember sixteenth. 

"We started going together," Jack re- 
calls, "but Vickii was also dating another 
fellow at the time. I remember that, when 
I couldn't get my wife-to-be to go out 
with me, I used to take out her mother, 
who is a wonderful person — and, thanks 
to her I won out. She helped do a good 
selling job on me." 

After going together for two and a half 
years. Jack and Vickii were married on 
their eighteenth birthday. "From the very 
start, we were inseparable. Life's too 
short," he says. "We don't go for being 
apart." So everywhere The Ambassadors 
went — and they covered most of the coun- 



try — Vickii went along. But the thing she 
and Jack really wanted was to settle 
down, in a home of their own — and, thanks 
to another singer named Smith, they got 
their wish. The Ambassadors were engaged 
for the Kate Smith radio show. 

"We set up housekeeping in a New York 
apartment," Jack says, then sighs in happy 
reminiscence. "Our first home!" But The 
Kate Smith Show was important to them 
for another reason, as well. From the very 
start, the trio had been singing on radio 
along with the bands which engaged them. 
Now, however, they were on their own — 
"strictly radio, and away from the band 
business," as Jack puts it. After four years 
with Kate, The Ambassadors were engaged 
for the Eddie Cantor radio show. And 
then it happened. . . . 

"I'm a grateful guy," Jack says. "I've 
been led into every fortunate thing that's 
happened to me." Apparently, however, 
there's such a thing as being too lucky. 
One radio show led to another, and some- 
how Jack found himself singing on eleven 
major shows (including those with Rudy 
Vallee, Frank Fay, Lucky Strike, tlu-ee 
Philip Morris shows, Texaco, Prudential 
Family Hour). In addition to being one 
third of The Ambassadors he was one four- 
teenth of "The Swing Fourteen," as well as 
a Hit Parader and one of Beverly's Boy 
Friends. 

"While one show went off," he recalls, 
"the other went on." It proved too much 
for Jack. Normally a completely relaxed 
person who sings because he enjoys it — 
in 1941, he broke out in shingles. "I had 
reached the end of my rope as far as nerves 
were concerned." Luckily, he had be- 
come a soloist on The Prudential Family 
Hour. The time had come, he felt, to strike 
out completely on his own. Giving up his 
ten other shows, he made the break. From 
now on, he was "strictly solo." 

That was when his name became im- 
portant. To distinguish him from "Whis- 
pering" Jack Smith, he was called 
"Smiling" Jack Smith — thanks to Deems 
Taylor, The Family Hour's host who 
used to introduce him as "the fellow with 
the smile in his voice." And, when Jack 
would sing his Spanish numbers, Deems 
would call him "Juanillo Foriador" — which 
means "Little John, the Smithy," but how 
else can you say Jack Smith in Spanish? 

But if Jack had been overworked be- 
fore, that was nothing compared with what 
he got into next. With World War II im- 
minent, he enrolled in a course in aircraft 
instrument maintenance — "so when we did 
go in, I'd be prepared to do something." 



The course was to last a year — six days a 
week — but, after six months, Jack was 
made an instructor. That meant six nights 
a week, as well. 

"Now I really started to work," he re- 
calls. He taught from 1941 until the be- 
ginning of 1946, doing The Family Hour — 
on his "day off" — Sunday — so he could 
keep his own family going. By 1945, how- 
ever, when the war looked as though it 
might be coming to an end, his manager 
thought it was time Jack took on a few 
more shows. With the result that Jack was 
back where he was before the war— on 
radio seven days a week. Only now he 
was teaching six days a week, as well! 

But, on August 19, 1945, all this hard 
work was more than repaid — for that was 
the night The Jack Smith Show first went 
on the air. A quarter-hour musical show, on 
five nights a week, it was to continue 
on radio for the next eight years. In 1948, 
the show moved from New York to the 
West Coast — so, at long last, the Smiths 
were home. And, at long last, they had 
the security to buy the house they had al- 
ways dreamed of. 

"Three years ago this summer," Jack 
says, "we found just the place — high in the 
Hollywood Hills, with a view of the Pacific 
and all of Los Angeles. It had to be a big 
home to accommodate all the furniture we 
had been accumulating. Every weekend 
while we lived in New York, we'd go to 
Connecticut, New Hampshire, and even 
Maine, in our search for Early American 
antiques. We'd do our refinishing on the 
roof of our apartment house." 

With his own show, Jack not only had 
the security to do what he wanted, but the 
time. "I think simplicity is the answer to 
everything," he says. "You can't be rush- 
ing. You've got to have time to take a 
look at other people — and to take a look 
at yourself." 

And that was why, in 1950, when Ralph 
Edwards and Jack saw that TV was the 
coming thing. Jack had reason to reflect. 
It wasn't just his security which was 
threatened, but his serenity, as well. His 
yardstick was no longer the number of 
shows he could appear on, but the num- 
ber of days he and Vickii could spend 
together. 

Curiously enough, it was Jack's quality 
as a human being — even more than his 
ability as a performer — that got him his 
first break in television. And it was Ralph 
Edwards who sold the sponsors of Place 
The Face on using Jack. They knew he 
could sing, but how did they know he 
could emcee? 

"Because he's sincere," Ralph said. "He 
genuinely likes people and they like him. 
What's more, he's honest, he's real — there's 
nothing manufactured about him." 

The sponsors were convinced. For, in 
Jvly, 1953, Jack appeared as emcee of Place 
The Face — his first regular TV show. It 
was a start, but Jack wasn't sure he 
wanted a night-time spot "where you've 
got to keep socking all the time, and you,'re 
only as good as your last show." The place 
for him, he felt, was in daytime TV. 

"It's the friendlier part of the twenty- 
four hours," he explains. "That's when 
the type of person I want to appeal to is 
watching. They want you to just be your- 
self, and — if they like you — they're loyal." 

Last May ninth, when Jack became 
emcee of Welcovie Travelers, he not only 
"found the show I'd been holding out for, 
but fulfilled a tremendous hope." Now, at 
long last, he is free to be himself — not 
"Smiling" Jack Smith or "Juanillo For- 
jador," but just plain Jack Smith. And he 
can thank his father for giving him the 
name. It's friendly and real down-to- 
earth. And, somehow, it's just right for the 
man who bears it — and perfect for the 
daytime TV he loves, so well. 



TEST YOUR MONEY I.Q..' 



WIN A VALUABLE PRIZE! 



CATCH-TBE-CASH puzzle 



NOTHING TO BUY! NO OBLIGATION! 

Win a valuable prize! Solve this easy Catch- 
the-Cash puzzle! The folks in the puzzle are 
catching $236. cash. You can see a $100 
bill ... $50 bill ... $20 bill ... and $1 
bill. Now fill in the 3 missing amounts on 
the puzzle below to make a total of $236. 
Here's a hint. One of the missing bills is 
$10. Now do you know the other 2 missing 
amounts? Enter the missing dollars on the 
small puzzle below. Fill out the coupon, clip 
around dotted line & mail NOW for your 
FREE GIFT! 

IT'S EASY TO CATCH CASH 
$50 . . . $100 . . . $500 & more 
IN SPARE TIME 

We're looking for folks with bright minds to 
make easy, extra money! Just show fast- 
selling Merit 21 for $1 Christmas Cards & 
other best sellers to friends, co-workers, etc. 
They're such bargains they practically sell 
themselves! YOU make up to 50< profit per 
box! Easiest way to get QUICK CASH — & 
plenty of it in spare time! Also, special fund- 
raising plan for groups. Check coupon below. 





GET YOUR 

FREE PRIZE NOW! 

HURRY 

OFFER LIMITED! i 



THIS EXQUISITE BOX OF 

21 BEAUTIFUL 
MERIT 
Christmas Cards! 

All YOURS! A gorgeous box of 21 
brand new Merit Christmas Cards 
with matching envelopes! Easily 
worth 1S( to 25 ( EACH. All 
21 are yours FREE if you solve 
the puzzle. Mail the right -^ 
answer — NOW! 



PASTE ON POST CARD-MAIL NOW 



Yours to keep — absolutely 
Free — Merit's full 21 Christ 
mas Card assortment when 
you send the answer to our 
easy puzzle! We'll also send 
you FREE personalized sta 
tionery & other samples on 
approval. Costs nothing to 
try! Only 1 entry per family. 
We reserve right to reject 
entries mailed 60 days after 
the month printed on cover of 
this publication. So hurry! 
Rush your answer to: 

Cofch-fhe-Casft 

MERIT 

Greeting Card Co 

370 Plane St.. Dept. 207, 
Newark 2. N. J. 

Puzzle & coupon^ when cut along 
dotted line, can be pasted to fit 
back of post card. Or mail in 
envelope if you wish. Act NOW! 

©Merit 1955 




Catch-the-Cash MERIT Greeting Card Co. | 

370 Pfane St., Dept. 207. Newark 2, N. J. j 

Here's my answer. Please rush my FREE box > 

of 21 Christmas Cards and envelopes, FREE J 

Personalized Stationery and other samples » 

on approval. I 

I 

f 

I 

I 
I 

City Zone State | 

□ Check here for Special Fund-Raising Plan for Groups ■ 



Name 



(Please PrintI 



Address 



71 



T 
V 
R 

72 



I 



nside Radio 

All Times Listed Are Eastern Daylight Time. 



Monday through Friday 



NBC 
Morning Programs 



MBS 



ABC 



CBS 



8:30 




Local Program 






8:45 






John MacVane 




9:00 




Robert Hurleigh 


Breakfast Club 




9:15 




Easy Ooes It 






9:30 




News, Cecil Brown 






9:45 




9:35 Easy Does It 
(con.) 






10:00 


Mary Margaret 

McBride 
10:05 Norman 


Cecil Brown 


My True Story 


Arthur Godfrey Time 












Vincent Peale 








10:15 


Joyce Jordan, M.D. 


Guest Time* 


10:25 Whispering 




10:30 


Doctor's Wife 


News 
10:35 Johnny 


Streets 




10:45 


Break The BanK 


Olsen Show 


When A Girl Marries 




11:00 


Strike rt Rich 


Florida Calling With 


Companion— 


Arthur Godfrey 






Tom Moore 


Dr. Mace 


(con.) 


11:15 




11:25 Holland Engle 


Paging The New 




11:30 


Phrase That Pays 


Oueen For A Day 


Albert Warner, News 


Make Up Your Mind 


11:45 


Second Chance 


*Wed., Faith In 
Our Time 


Your Neighbor's 
Voice 


Second Husband 



Afte 

12:00 

12:15 
12:30 
12:45 


rnoon Progr 


ams 

Noon News 
12:05 Down At 
Holmesy's 


Valentino 
Frank Farrell 


Wendy Warren & 

The News 
Rosemary 
Helen Trent 
Our Gal Sunday 


1:00 
1:15 
1:30 
1:45 




News, Cedric Foster 
Luncheon At Sardi's 
Ted Steele Show 


Paul Harvey, News 
Ted Malone 


Road Of Life 
Ma Perkins 
Young Dr. Malone 
The Guiding Light 


2:00 
2:15 

2:30 
2:45 




Luncheon With 

Lopez 
2:25 News, Sam 

Hayes 
Wonderful City 


Martin Block 


Second Mrs. Burton 
Perry Mason 

This Is Nora Drake 
The Brighter Day 


3:00 
3:15 
3:30 
3:45 


News 

3:05 Woman In Love 
Pepper Young 
Right To Happiness 


Ruby Mercer Show 


Martin Block (con.) 


Hilltop House 
Art Linkletter's 
House Party 


4:00 
4:15 

4:30 
4:45 


Backstage Wife 
Stella Dallas 

Young Widder Brown 
Woman In My House 


Bruce & Dan 

Tex Fletcher's 
Wagon Show 


Latin Quarter 
Matinee 

Treasury Bandstand 


Treasury Bandstand 
4:55 News 


5:00 
5:15 
5:30 
5:45 


Just Plain Bill 
Lorenzo Jones 
tone Ranger 

5:55 Davy Crockett 


Sgt. Preston 

Bobby Benson 
America's Business 
5:50 Wismer, Sports 
5:55 Cecil Brown 


Musical Express 
Bobby Hammack 
Gloria Parker 
Vincent Lopez 

fM-W-F 


News 

5:05 John Faulk 

5:55 This 1 Believe 



6:00 
8:15 
6:30 
6:45 

7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 



8:00 

8:15 
8:30 
8:45 



9:00 



9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



Monday 



Three Star Extra 



Evening Programs 



Alex Dreier, Man 

On The Go 
News Of The World 
One Man's Family 



Henry J. Taylor 
Berkshire Festival 



Telephone Hour 



Band Of America 



Fibber McGee & 

Molly 
Great Gildersleeve 
Wings For Tomorrow 



Local Program 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 
Gabriel Heatter 
In The Mood 



Top Secret Files 



Broadway Cop 



News, Lyie Van 
9:05 Footnotes to 

History 
Spotlight Story 
Reporters' Roundup 



Virgil Pinkley 

Orchestra 
Distinguished Artists 



ABC Reporter 

Bill Stern, Sports 
George Hicks, News 



Vandercook, News 

Quincy Howe 

Strange 

Saga 

7:55 News 



Red Benson 



Voice Of Firestone 



Music Tent 
9:25 News 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
How To Fix It 
Martha Lou Harp 



Jackson & The News 
East Of Athens 



Lowell Thomas 



Scoreboard 
7:05 Tennessee 

Ernie 
Edward R. Murrow 



Mr. Keen, Tracer 
Of Lost Persons 
8:25 Doug Edwards 
Arthur Godfrey's 
Talent Scouts 



Disk Derby 



Bing Crosby 
Amos 'n' Andy Music 
Hall 

9:55 News 



Scoreboard 



Tuesday 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 



8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 



9:00 



9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



NBC 



Three Star Extra 



Alex Oreier, 

Man On The Go 
News Of The World 
One Man's Family 



People Are Funny 
Dragnet 



Biographies In 
Sound 



Fibber McGee & 

Molly 
Great Gildersleeve 
New England 



Evening Programs 

MBS ABC 

Local Program ABC Reporter 



Bill Stern, Sports 
George Hicks, News 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 
Gabriel Heatter 
Eddie Fisher 



Treasury Agent 

John Steele, 
Adventurer 



News, LyIe Vali 
9:05 Footnotes To 

History 
Spotlight Story 
Army Hour 



Virgil Pinkley 

Men's Corner 
Dance Music 



Vandercook, News 
Quincy Howe 
Strange 
Saga 



Scoreboard 
7:05 Tennessee 

Ernie 
Edward R. Murrow 



Red Benson 
8:25 News 
Alan Dale Show 
8:55 News 



Music Show 
9:25 E. D. Canham, 
News 



9:55 News 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
How To Fix It 
Take Thirty 



CBS 
Jackson & The New; 

Lowell Thomas 



Suspense 

8:25 Doug Edwards 
Disk Derby, 
Fred Robbins 



Rosemary Clooney 
Bing Crosby 



Amos 'n' Andy Music 
Hall 



Scoreboard 
10:05 Dance 
Orchestra 



Wednesday 



Evening Programs 



7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 



8:00 
8:15 



8:30 
8:45 



9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 
10:15 
10:30 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



Three Star Extra 



Alex Dreier, 

Man On The Go 
News Of The World 
One Man's Family 



News 

8:35 College Quiz 
Bowl 



Best Of Groucho 

Truth Or 
Consequences 



7:00 
7:15 



7:30 
7:45 



8:00 
8:15 
8:30 



9:00 



9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



Fibber McGee & 

Molly 
Great Gildersleeve 

Keys To The Capital 



Thursday 



Three Star Extra 



Local Program 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 
Gabriel Heatter 
In The Mood 



True Detective 
Sentenced 



News, LyIe Van 
Spotlight Story 
Family Theater 



Alex Dreier, 
Man On The Go 

News Of The World 
One Man's Family 



Roy Rogers 
Dr. Six Gun 



News 

9:05 Barrie Craig 



The Loser 
9:55 News 



7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 

8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 



9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



Fibber McGee & 

Molly 
Great Gildersleeve 
Jane Pickens Show 



Friday 



Three Star Extra 



Virgil Pinkley 

Medical Press 

Conference 

Sounding Board 

Evening 

Local Program 



ABC Reporter 

Bill Stern, Sports 
George Hicks, News 



Vandercook, News 
Quincy Howe 
Strange 
Saga 



Red Benson 



8:25 News 
Alan Dale Show 



8:55 News 



Music Show 
9:25 News 

President's News 
Conference 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Behind The Iron 

Curtain 
Gabriel Heatter 
Eddie Fisher 



Official Detective 
Cry Danger 



News, LyIe Van 
9:05 Footnotes to 

History 
Spotlight Story 
State Of The Nation 



Virgil Pinkley 

Book Hunter 
Henry Jerome Orch. 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
Blue Ribbon Bouts 



Programs 

ABC Reporter 

Bill Stern, Sports 
George Hicks, News 



Jackson & The News 



Lowell Thomas 



Scoreboard 
7:05 Tennessee 

Ernie 
Edward R. Murrow 



FBI In Peace And 

War 
8:25 Doug Edwards 
Disk Derby, 

Fred Robbins 



Disk Derby (con.) 

Bing Crosby 

Amos 'n' Andy Music 

Hall 
9:55 News 



Vandercook, News 
Quincy Howe 

Strange 
Saga 



Red Benson 



Alan Dale Show 
8:55 News 



Music Show 



9:25 News 

Rhythm & Blues 
On Parade 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
How To Fix It 
Front & Center 



Scoreboard 



White House Report 



Jackson & The News 



Lowell Thomas 



Scoreboard 
7:05 Tennessee 
Ernie 

Edward R. Murrow 



The Whistler 
8:25 Doug Edwards 
Disk Derby, 
Fred Robbins 



Rosemary Clooney 
Bing Crosby 



Amos 'n' Andy Music 
Hall 



Evening Programs 



Alex Dreier, 

Man On The Go 
News Of The World 
One Man's Family 



National Radio 
Fan Club 



Radio Fan Club 
(con.) 



Ted Heath Orch. 
Stars In Action 



Local Program 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 
Gabriel Heatter 
In The Mood 



Counter-Spy 
City Editor 



News, LyIe Van 
9:05 Footnotes To 

History 
Heartbeat Of 

Industry 



Virgil Pinkley 

Forbes Report 

London Studios 

Melodies 



ABC Reporter 

Bill Stern, Sports 
George Hicks, News 



Vandercook, News 
Quincy Howe 
Strange 
Saga 



Red Benson 
8:25 News 
Alan Dale Show 
8:55 News 



Music Show 
Notes & Notations 

9:55 News 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
How To Fix It 
Indoors Unlimited 



Scoreboard 
10:05 Dance 
Orchestra 



Jackson & The News 



Lowell Thomas 



Scoreboard 
7:05 Tennessee 

Ernie 
Edward R. Murrow 



Godfrey Digest 
8:25 Doug Edwards 
Disk Derby, 
Fred Robbins 



Disk Derby (con.) 

Bing Crosby 

Amos 'n' Andy Music 

Hall 
9:55 News 



Scoreboard 
10:05 Dance 
Orchestra 



I 

I* 



nside Radio 



Saturday 



NBC 



MBS 



-.Morning Programs 

•:30, Monitor Local Program 

S:4S 



9:00 Monitor 
9:15 
9:30 I 
9:45 



10:00 Monitor 

10:15 i 
10:30 I 
10:45 



11:00 Monitor 

11:15 

11:30; 

11:45 



American Travel 
Guide 



Lucky Pierre 



Johnny Desmond 

Show 
11:55 Young Living 



ABC 



Doug Browning 
Show 



GBS 



No School 
Today 



No School 
Today (con.) 

Breakfast Club 
Review 



11:05 Half-Pint 
Panel 

All League Club- 
house 



News 



News Of America 
Farm News 



Garden Gate 



News 

10:05 Galen Drake 
Show 

10:55 News 



Robert Q. Lewis 
Show 



"Afternoon Programs 

I Asked You 



12:00 National Farm 8> 
' 12:15 Home Hour 

12:30 Monitor 
12:45 



Tex Fletcher 
Wagon Show 



News Noon News 

12:05 How To Fix It 12:05 Romance 
101 Ranch Boys 

American Farmer Gunsmoke 



1:00 Monitor 

1:15 

1:30 

1:45 



2:00 Monitor 
2:15 
2:30 
2:45 



Fifth Army Band 
Ruby Mercer 



Ruby Mercer (con.) 
2:25 News 
Sports Parade 



3:00 Monitor 
a:i3 
3:30 
3:45 



Country Jamboree 



4:00 

4:15 
4:30 
4:45 



Monitor 



' 5:00 

5:15 
I 5:30 

> 5:45 



Monitor 



Bandstand, U.S.A. 



Teenagers, U.S.A. 



5:55 News 



News 

1:05 Navy Hour 

Vincent Lopez 

1 :55 News 



News 

2:05 Festival, with 
Milton Cross 



News 

3:05 Festival (con.) 



News 

4:05 Pop Concert 

Horse Racing 

World Tourists 



News 
5:05 Dinner At The 
Green Room 



City Hospital 
1:25 News, Jackson 
Stan Daugherty 
Presents 



Dance Orchestra 
Teddy Wilson Orch. 



String Serenade 
Skinnay Ennis Orch. 



Treasury Show 



Adventures In 

Science 
Richard Hayes 
News, Jackson 
5:35 Saturday At 

The Chase 



Evening Programs 



1 6:00 


Monitor 


John T. Flynn 


News 

6:05 Pan-American 
Union 


News 


, 6:15 




World Traveler 


Sports, Bob Finnegan 


Sports Review 


6:30 




Report From 
Washington 


Bob Edge, Sports 
Afield 


Capitol Cloakroom 


6:45 




Basil Heatter 




6:55 Joe Foss, 
Sports 


7:00 


Monitor 


Pop The auestion 


News 

7:05 At Ease 


News, Jackson 
7:05 Make Way For 


7:15 








Youth 


7:30 




Wonderful City 


Labor-Manage- 


Gangbusters 


7:45 






ment Series 




1 8:00 
' 8:15 


Monitor 


True Or False 


News 


Gunsmoke 






8:05 Dance Party 




8:30 




Quaker City Capers 




Disk Derby, 


8:45 








Fred Robbins 


9:00 


Monitor 


Hawaii Calls 


News 


Two For The Money 


9:15 






9:05 Dance Party 




9:30 


Grand Ole Opry 


Lombardo Land 


(con.) 


Country Style 


9:45 








9:55 News, Jackson 


10:00 


Monitor 


CBC Symphony 


News 
10:05 Ozark 


Country Style (con.) 


10:15 






Jubilee 




10:30 






Ambassador Hotel 


Dance Orchestra 



Sunday 



NBC 



Morning Programs 



MBS 



ABC 



CBS 



8:30 
8:45 


Monitor 




Light And Life Hour 


Renfro Valley 
8:55 Galen Drakb 


9:00 
9:15 

9:30 

9:45 


Monitor 


Wings Of Healing 
Back To God 


News 

9:05 Milton Cross 

Album 
Voice Of Prophecy 


World News Roundup 
Sidney Walton Show 

Organ Music, 

E. Power Biggs 
9:55 News, Trout 


10:00 
10:15 

10:30 
10:45 


Monitor 


Radio Bible Class 
Voice Of Prophecy 


News 

10:05 Message Of 

Israel 
News 
10:35 College Choir 


Church Of The Air 

Church Of The Air 
(con.) 


11:00 
11:15 
11:30 
11:45 


Monitor 


Frank And Ernest 

Christian Science 

Monitor 
Northwestern 

Reviewing Stand 


Sunday Melodies 
11:05 Marines On 
Review 

News 

11:35 Christian In 
Action 


Salt Lake Tabernacle 
Choir 

Invitation To 
Learning 



Afternoon Programs 



12:00 

12:15 
12:30 

12:45 


Monitor 


Marine Band 

News, Bill Cunning- 
ham 
Merry Mailman 


The World Tomorrow 


News, LeSueur 
12:05 The Leading 

Question 
Foreign Affairs 
Washington Week 


1:00 
1:15 
1:30 

1:45 


Monitor 


Global Frontiers 
Christian Science 
Lutheran Hour 


Herald Of Truth 

News 

1:35 Pilgrimage 


Woolworth Hour- 
Percy Faith, 
Donald Woods 


2:00 
2:15 
2:30 
2:45 


Monitor 


Music From Britain 


Dr. Oral Roberts 
Wings Of Healing 


Kathy Godfrey 

World Music 
Festival 


3:00 

3:15 
3:30 
3:45 


Monitor 


Music From Britain 

(con.) 
Bandstand, U.S.A 

Basil Heatter 


News 

3:05 Air Force Show 

Hour Of Decision 


World Music 
Festival (con.) 


4:00 
4:15 
4:30 
4:45 


Monitor 


Salute To The Nation 

Nick Carter 

4:55 Lome Greene 


Old-Fashioned 
Revival Hour 


News, Trout 
4:05 On A Sunday 
Afternoon 


5:00 
5:15 
5:30 
5:45 


Monitor 


Adventures Of Rin 

Tin Tin 
The Masqueraders 
5:55 Cecil Brown 


News 

5:05 Disaster 

Church In The Home 


News, Trout 
5:05 On A Sunday 
Afternoon (con.) 
5:55 News, Trout 



Monitor 



Evening Programs 

6:00 

6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



7:00 



7:15 
7:30 
7:45 

8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 



9.00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



Monitor 



Monitor 



Monitor 



Fibber McGee & 

Molly 
Great Gildersleeve 
Monitor 



Public Prosecutor- 
Jay Jostyn 

On The Line, Bob 
Considine 

AM Star Sport Time 



Richard Hayes Show 



Studio Concert 



West Point Band 
Enchanted Hour 



Fulton Lewis, Jr 
Success Story 
Manion Forum 
Keep Healthy 



Billy Graham 
Little Symphonies 



Monday Morning 

Headlines 
Paul Harvey, News 
Evening Comes 



Gene Autry 



Summer In St. Louis 



News 

7:05 Showtime 

Revue 
George Sokolsky 
Valentino 
Travel Talk 



American Town 
Meeting 



Walter Winchell 
News, Quincy Howe 
Sammy Kaye 
9:55 News 



Paul Harvey, News 

Elmer Davis 
Revival Time 



Juke Box Jury 



Our Miss Brooks 
Gary Crosby 



Rudy Vallee Show 



News, Schorr . 

10:05 Face The Na- ' 

tion V 

John Derr, Sports n 



See Next Page- 



73 



TV program highlights 

NEW YORK CITY AND SUBURBS AND NEW HAVEN, CHANNEL 8, JULY 8— AUGUST 7 



Baseball on TV 



D — Doubleheader R — Road game 



DATE 


TIME 


CH. 


JULY 






8,F. 


8:00 


11 


9, Sat. 


2:00 


2,11 


10, Sun. 


2:00 


11 


14, Th. 


8:00 


9 




8:00 


11 


15, F. 


1:30 


9 




1:30 


11 


16, Sat. 


2:00 


2,8, 




2:00 


11 


17, Sun. 


2:00 


8,9 




2:00 


11 


18, M. 


8:00 


9 




8:00 


11 


19, Tu. 


1:30 


11 


20, W. 


1:30 


11 




.8:00 


9 


21, Th. 


1:30 


9 




1:30 


11 


22, F. 


8:00 


9 




8:00 


11 


23, Sat. 


2:00 


2,11 




2:00 


8,9 


24, Sun. 


2:00 


8,9 



TIME CH. 



Dodgers vs. Giants 
Dodgers vs. Giants 
Dodgers vs. Giants 
St. L. vs. Dodgers 
Chi. vs. Giants 
St. L. vs. Dodgers 
Chi. vs. Giants 
8, 9 Cine. vs. Dodgers 
Mil. vs. Giants 
Cine. vs. Dodgers 
Mil. vs. Giants 
Cine. vs. Dodgers 
Mil. vs. Giants 
St. L. vs. Giants 
St. L. vs. Giants 
Chi. vs. Dodgers 
Chi. vs. Dodgers 
St. L. vs. Giants 
Mil. vs. Dodgers 
Cine. vs. Giants 
Cine. vs. Giants 
Mil. vs. Dodgers 
Mil. vs. Dodgers- 



D 



24, Sun. 

26, Tu. 

27, W. 

28, Th. 

29, F. 

30, Sat. 

31, Sun. 

AUGUST 
1,M. 

2,Tu. 

3,W. 
4,Th. 
5,F. 

6, Sat. 

7, Sun. 



2:00 
8:15 
9:00 
2:00 
9:00 
2:00 
9:00 
8:15 
2:00 
2:00 
9:00 
2:00 

10:00 
8:15 

10:00 
2:00 
2:00 
2:30 
8:15 
2:00 
3:00 
2:00 



Cine. vs. Giants — ^D 
Chi. vs. Yanks 
Dodgers vs. Cine. — R 
Chi. vs. Yanks 
Dodgers vs. Cine. — R 
Chi. vs. Yanks 
Dodgers vs. Cine. — R 
Kan. C. vs. Yanks 
Det. vs. Boston 



11 
11 

9 
11 

9 
11 

9 
11 

2 

8, 11 Kan. C. vs. Yanks 

9 Dodgers vs. St. L.— R 

8, 11 Kan. C. vs. Yanks— D 

9 Dodgers vs. Mil.— R 

11 Clave, vs. Yanks 

9 Dodgers vs. Mil.— R 

11 Cleve. vs. Yanks 

11 Cleve. vs. Yanks 

9 Dodgers vs. Chi.- 

11 Det. vs. Yanks 

8, 11 Det. vs. Yanks 

2 



-R 



Giants vs. Cine. — R 
3, 11 Det. vs. Yanks— D 



8; 

9i 

10 

10; 

11: 

111 

12: 

12: 
12: 

12: 
1 



74 



Monday through Friday 



00 O Morning Show— News & Collingwood 

O & |T] Today— Garroway wakes the sun 
55 O Herb Sheldon-With Jo McCarthy 
00 Q George Skinner— Songs & chatter 
:00 O Garry Moore Show— Songs& laughter 

O & [U Ding Dong School— TV nursery 
:30 Q Arthur Godfrey Time— The gang 

O & H] Way Of The World-Drama 
:00 O Home — Arlene Francis, homemaker 

O Romper Room— TV baby-sitting 
:30 O & [s] Strike It Rich-Here's Hull 

© Wendy Barrie— Slightly delirious 
:00 Valiant Lady— Heart-tugging drama 

O & [i] Tennessee Ernie— Noodling 
:15 G &[l]Love Of Life-Serial 
:30 O & [H Search For Tomorrow— Serial 

O Feather Your Nest— Bud Collyer 

O Summer Entertainment— Variety 
;45 O (& [U at 2:30)— Guiding Light 

(D Dr. Norman Vincent Peale 
:00 Q Inner Flame— Portia faces life 

O Norman Brokenshire Show— Fun! 

Q Claire Mann— Glamorize yourself 
:15 O Road Of Life— Daytime drama 
:30 &[l]WelcomeTravelers— From NYC 

O First-Run Feature Films 
:00 & m Robert Q. Lewis Show— Lively 

O Here's Looking At You— Beauty hints 
:30 Art Linkletter's House Party— Gay 
:00 & [§] Big Payoff— Mink-lined quiz 

O Ted Mack Show— Variety 

O Ted Steele Show— Variety 
:30 Bob Crosby— Cats and all 

O & [U Greatest Gift— Serial 
:45 O & [U Concerning Miss Marlowe 
:00 Brighter Day— Daytime drama 

O & [fl Hawkins Falls— Serial 
:15 & [i] Secret Storm— Serial 

Q First Love— Drama of newlyweds 
:30 & [i] On Your Account— $$ quiz 

Q World Of Mr. Sweeney— Laughs 
EARLY EVENING 
:30 O Liberace— 88 keys & 32 teeth 
:30 O Million Dollar Movie— July 8-11, 
"Lucky Nick Cain," George Raft, Coleen 
Gray; July 12-18, "Devil On Horseback," 
Googie Withers, John McCallum; July 19-25, 
"Forbidden," Doug Montgomery; July 26- 
Aug. 1, "Tom Brown's Schooldays." 
:45 Julius La Rosa— Songs 



LATE NIGHT 
10:00 O Million Dollar Movie— Same sched- 
ule as shown at 7:30 P.M. 
11:00 (D Liberace— Candelabras and music 
11:10 Featurama— Short films 
11:15 O Steve Allen Show-A ball 



Monday P.M. 



7:30 Life With Elizabeth-Betty V/hite 

Name's The Same— Bob & Ray emcee 
8:00 Burns & Alien— Coupled comedy 

O & H] Caesar Presents— Phil Foster 
stars in show produced by Sid 

Digest Drama— Shrunken stories 
8:30 Godfrey's Talent Scouts 

Voice Of Firestone— Summer recitals 
9:00 & [H Those Whiting Girls— Comedy 

Pee Wee King Show— Corn-fed fun 
9:30 & [U Ethel & Albert— Comedy 

O Robert Montgomery Presents 
10:00 &[8]WestinghouseSummerTheater 

Eddie Cantor— Cool comedy 
10:30 O Big Town— Mark Stevens as Sieve 



Tuesday 



7:30 Talent Hour, Country Style 
8:00 Life With Father— Leon Ames stars 
O Place The Face— Bill Cullen emcees 
8:30 Halls Of Ivy— Colmans in re-runs 
O Arthur Murray Dancing Party 
9:00 &[8]MeetMillie— Elena Verdugostars 
O Kleenex Theater — Absorbing 
Make Room For Daddy— Re-runs 
9:30 & [§] Red Skelton Show— Re-runs 

Center Stage— Hour films of fine 
dramas performed during past winter season. 
Special: Aug. 2, Musical from Detroit 
10:00 $64,000 Question— $$$$ quiz 
O & [1] Truth Or Consequences 
10:30 Music '55— Sounds by Kenton 
O '*'s A Great Life— Re-runs 



Wednesday 



7:30 Disneyland— Repeat shows 

8:00 © What's The Story— News-panel quiz 

O Request Performance— Drama 
8:30 O (& m at 9:30) My Little Margie 

Mr. Citizen— Stories of heroism 
9:00 Kraft Theater— Fine plays as usual 

Masquerade Party— Costume quiz 



9:30 I've Got A Secret-Panel quiz 

Penny To A Million— Higher finance 
10:00 &[1] U.S. Steel Theater-July 13, 27; 
Front Row Center, July 20 & Aug. 3 
O This Is Your Life— Re-runs 
Blue Ribbon Boxing 
10:30 O Doug Fairbanks Presents— Stories 
10:45 Henry & Rocky Show— Variety 



Thursday 



7:30 Lone Ranger— Hi yo. Silver! 
8:00 Meet Mr. McNulty— Re-runs 

O & [U Best Of Groucho— Re-runs 

Soldier Parade— Gl entertainers 
8:30 O Make A Connection— Quiz-panel 
9:00 O & tu Dragnet— Webb in re-runs 

O Star Tonight— Filmed teleplays 
9:30 O & [U Ford Theater— Re-runs 

O Dotty Mack Show— Musicmimies 
10:00 Public Defender— Reed Hadley 

O & H] lujc Theater— From Hollywood 
10:30 Willy-June Havoc in July 

Racket Squad— Hadley stars 



Friday 



7:30 O Adventures Of Rin Tin Tin— Arf! 

8:00 & d] Pantomime Quiz— Stokey's bit 
O Midwestern Hayride— Hillbilly music 

8:30 Topper— Comedy re-runs 

O & H] Life Of Riley— Comedy re-runs 
T-Men In Action— Crime cotchin' 

9:00 Playhouse Of Stars— Filmed dramas 
© Mr. & Mrs. North— Whodunits 

9:30 Our Miss Brooks— Re-runs 

O & H] Dear Phoebe— Comedy re-runs 
The Vise — Suspense from England 
10:00 The Line-Up— City police in action 

© Chance Of A Lifetime— Variety 
10:30 O So This Is Hollywood— Comedy 
© Alec Templeton— Music-maker 
Mr. District Attorney— David Brian 



Saturday 



7:30 Beat The Clock— Stunts for prizes 
O Show Wagon— Heidt's talent salute 
Ozark Jubilee— 90-minute hoedown 
8:00 America's Greatest Bands— Paul 
Whitemon emcees this summer replacement 
O The Soldiers— Comedy, starring Hal 
March and Tom D'Andrea 
9:00 Two For The Money— Sam Levenson 
O & [1] Musical Chairs— July 30 only: 
Spectacular 

Lawrence Welk— Champagne music 
9:30 O Durante-O'Connor Show— Re-runs 
10:00 O & [U George Gobel Summer Show 

O Compass— Filmed dramas 
10:30 Damon Runyon Theater— Stories 
O & HI Your Playtime 



Sunday 



6:00 I Love Lucy— Repeat of early shows 
7:00 O & [§] People Are Funny— Linkletter 

You Asked For It— Art Baker, emcee 
7:30 Private Secretary— Comedy re-runs 

O Spectacular— July 17 
8:00 & [s] Toast Of The Town— Variety 

O Sunday Hour— GeorgeMurphy,emcee 
9:00 G-E Theater— Ronald Regan, host 

O & H] TV Playhouse— Hour teleplays 
9:30 Stage 7— Stories filmed In Hollywood 

© Life Begins At Eighty— Lots of fun 
10:00 Julius La Rosa— Musicale 

O & m Cameo Theater 

Break The Bank— Bert Parks, quiz 
10:30 & [s] What's My Line?— Job game 

Q Bob Cummings Show— Farce re-runs 

Paris Precinct— Louis Jourdon stars 



w 



(Continued from page 63) 
accommodations and were freely taking 
notes on tape recorders, electric type- 
writers and celluloid cuffs. Madelyn Pugh 
and Bob Carroll, Jr. couldn't believe 
what they heard, but they preserved dia- 
logue and continuity with the incredulous 
delight of a museum curator acquiring the 
funny bone of a dinosaur. 

"People aren't like that," said Miss Pugh. 

"No, but the Whitings are," beamed Mr. 

larrcll. 

"Next question — are the Whitings 
people?" asked his collaborator. 

Mr. Carroll slid this query into the 
mixer and awaited a result, which proved 
to be a fine, smooth epigram: "The Whit- 
ings are a moment of laughter in the grim 
business of living." 

As ideas for Those Whiting Girls began 
to congeal in the minds of the bemused 
writers, it seemed logical for the mother 
of the subjects to plaj- herself in the TV 
show. Mrs. Whiting refused with a simple, 
uncompUcated "No." Pressed for valid 
reasons, she offered just one: "I have 
avoided show business all my life. Now, 
at this late date, why should I involve 
myself with a pair of theatrical come- 
backs?" 

"Comeback is a hoiTid word," said Mar- 
garet. 

"And a true one," said Mrs. Whiting, 
not budging an inch. 

Margaret sighed. "True, indeed. I was a 
girl singer for fifteen years. As for Bar- 
bara, she was a midget child star for 20th 
Century-Fox longer than anyone except 
Mr. Zanuck's grandmother can recall." 

This crack, like most Whiting bon mots, 
contains just enough fact to give the fan- 
tasy authentic flavor. The daughters of 



Those Whiting Girls! 

famed songwriter Dick Whiting grew up in 
show business. When other girls were 
giggling over their high-school dance pro- 
grams, Margaret was smiling upon her 
royalty checks from recording companies. 
Disc collectors cherish her platters of 
"My Ideal," "Bewitched, Bothered, and 
Bewildered," "Sentimental Journey," "Slip- 
pin' Around," "Moonlight in Vermont," 
and the more recent "End of a Love Af- 
fair," "The Moon Was Yellow," and "Stow- 
away." 

Meanwhile, Barbara was living through 
one of the era's longest adolescences in 
"Junior Miss," "Centennial Summer," 
"Home Sweet Homicide," "Carnival in 
Costa Rica," "City Across the River," and 
"I Can Get It for You Wholesale." Now 
in her twenties, Barbara looks fourteen, 
speaks with the wisdom of the ages. 

When it became apparent that the ac- 
tual Mother Whiting could not be per- 
suaded to play herself in the TV show, 
the search was joined for a logical pro- 
totype. Seldom has a casting director been 
faced with so complicated a task: He must 
find a motherly woman, essentially sweet, 
but with a touch of lemon for contrast. 
She must not dither, neither must she turn 
wry. She must have an air of unquestion- 
able authority, yet she must be flexible 
enough to roll with the tides set up by as 
breezy a pair of daughters as ever disen- 
gaged themselves from a whirlwind. She 
must be, in brief, Mrs. Whiting to the 
life. 

Mabel Albertson finally won the role 
and, after the pilot film was shot, Mar- 
garet cornered her synthetic mother to 
demand suspiciously, "You didn't abandon 
me in Detroit twenty-odd years ago, now 
did you?" 



Like everyone whom the Whitings enjoy, 
Mabel Albertson has become a member of 
the clan, and is expected to take her place 
in all family festivities. This can be a 
confusing assignment. In the TV show, 
there is a four-year difference in the 
ages of Margaret and Barbara, although — 
factually speaking — between them there 
are seven years and a good deal of sisterly 
hi jinks. 

Barbara's hair is now dark auburn, a 
color job useful under TV lights. When a 
friend complimented her upon her magni- 
ficent head of short, bright tresses, Mar- 
garet answered smoothly for her sister: 
"And just think: This color is forever — 
and a dye." 

Barbara is the telephone kid. She is on 
the wire from morning till night, but most 
vociferously from four until seven each 
afternoon. In regard to this alternating 
dial-click and bell-ringing, Margaret has 
said, "To some, this is the children's hour. 
To others, the cocktail hour. To us, it is the 
dreadful hour." 

Over the telephone — to whatever devoted 
buddy with whom Barbara happens to be 
carrying on one of those guarded but elo- 
quent conversations filled with be-bop, 
backstage phrases, and pure slang — she 
counters Margaret's assault by an offensive 
of her own. "In our TV show, my sister 
has to be beautiful — if you can imagine." 

Margaret says, gazing into the middle 
distance, "A lot of young people — that's 
you — have no respect for their elders. No 
appreciation of the things they might learn 
from relatives and friends. They could 
spare themselves a bad experience later 
on, but they won't." 

Barbara says to her caller, as if the com- 
ment fitted the conversation without 



j><fe/ Easier, surer protection for your most intimate marriage prob em 

Tested by doctors. . . proved in hospital clinics 



\ 




NORFORmS 

VAGINAL SUPPOSITORIES 



Tested by doctors 
Trusted by women 



1. Antiseptic (Protective, germicidal action) 

Norforms are now safer and surer than ever! A highly perfected 
new formula releases its antiseptic and germicidal ingredients 
right in the vaginal tract. The exclusive new base melts at body 
temperature, forming a powerful protective film that permits 
long-lasting action. Will not harm delicate tissues. 

2. Deodorant (Protection from odor) 

Norforms were tested in a hospital clinic and found to be more 
effective than anything it had ever used. Norforms are powerfully 
deodorant — they eliminate (rather than cover up) embarrassing 
odors, yet have no "medicine" or "disinfectant" odor themselves. 

3. Convenient (So easy to use) 

Norforms are small vaginal suppositories, so easy and convenient 
to use. Just insert — no apparatus, no mixing or measuring. They're 
greaseless and they keep in any climate. Your druggist has them 
in boxes of 12 and 24. Also available in Canada. 



Mail tt}is coupon today 



FREE informative Norforms booklet 

Just mail this coupon to: Dept. RT-58 
Norwich Pharmacal Company, Norwich, N. Y. 

Please send me the new Norforms booklet, in a 
plain envelope. 



/ 


Namp 
Stre<"t 


(please print) 




T 
V 
R 


A NORWICH PRODUCT 


City 


Zone 


State 





75 



planing off the odd edges, "We think we 
have the very first musical TV show in 
which music is kept in its place. If a song 
advances the plot, Margaret sings it. Other- 
wise, she's my straight woman. An in- 
novation — the first time a singer has 
stooged for a great dramatic actress." 

"It may be the last," observes Margaret. 

"This is all from Chile," says Barbara. 
"I'll have to go now. Call me again when 
you're near a telephone." 

Hanging up, she likes to make an an- 
nouncement of devastating import. One af- 
ternoon, she explained that she had been 
looking over the scripts for the show, 
". . . AND, in the fifth episode, an elephant 
steps on your foot, Margaret!" 

"Where are we going to get an ele- 
phant?" Margaret wanted to know. 

"At the carnival, of course. Just after I 
get the paint spilled all over me!" 

Volatile and animated, Barbara is in- 
clined to illustrate every observation with 
a gesture. Old-time dramatic coaches 
would have loved her — an attitude not en- 
tirely shared by Margaret, who is more 
inclined to use her voice for effect. 

In order to break Barbara of some of 
her more far-flung gesticulations, Mar- 
garet sometimes assumes an exaggeratedly 
empty expression and windmills through 
one of Barbara's active exercises. In turn, 
Barbara will drop her voice to a sub- 
Tallulah register and imitate her sister's 
most effective vocal mannerisms. 

To get the flavor of the home that 
Margaret likes to call Madness, Incorpor- 
ated, one should be invited to Sunday din- 
ner. First order is church attendance. "We 
are pretty religious about going to church," 
is the way Barbara states it. 

But let us report the occasion exactly 
as a guest once told it in wonder and de- 
light — and with love, as well. This chap 
was a business associate of the Whitings, 
had known them since they were worry- 
ing about whether Dior knew what he 
was doing with hemlines six inches from 
the turf. 

"I was driving along Sunset Boulevard 
around noon," he reported, "when Mar- 
garet pulled up alongside of me in her 
Cadillac convertible with the top down, 
and called out, 'Come on up to the house 
for dinner.' As traffic was heavy and fans 
are always convinced of their essential 
desirability in the opinion of a star, Mar- 
garet found herself almost immediately 
tailed by three cars in addition to mine. 

"Of this she was totally unaware. She 
pulled into the parking lot next to 
Schwab's, and darted into the drugstore 



while her admirers cluttered up the traffic 
on Sunset considerably. Because I knew 
where I was going, I continued to Bel Air. 
Besides, I know Margaret at a drugstore 
magazine stand. She never leaves a dis- 
play without ten to twenty periodicals 
under her arm. Sometimes she reads every 
one from cover to cover — she's a quick 
study. Sometimes she can't find what she 
wants. The next day — twenty more maga- 
zines. I'll bet she could win an Oscar for 
the best performance, annually, in the 
bound-paper chase. 

"When I reached the house I found Elea- 
nor — that's Margaret's mother, but every- 
one calls her Eleanor, including her chil- 
dren and her granddaughter — and Aunt 
Mag, who is Eleanor's sister. Aunt Mag 
is famous in her own right. She was the 
famous Margaret Young in the Terrific 
Twenties, and she introduced such songs 
as 'O, By Jingo' and 'Hard-hearted Han- 
nah.' They let me in on the fact that 
Margaret was scheduled to leave by air 
that afternoon to start a series of sing- 
ing engagements in the South. 

"They said that, first, we'd have dinner. 
Margaret, still tailed by a delighted queue, 
arrived thirty minutes later and we all sat 
down. All, that is, except Barbara. She 
would be along in a moment, Willie May 
said. Willie May has been with the Whit- 
ings for years, and her word is law. 

"At the table, there were the Whitings — 
Eleanor, Aunt Mag, Margaret and her 
beautiful little daughter, Debbie Busch — a 
chap from Margaret's agency, an attorney, 
a photographer, and a beau of Mar- 
garet's. Everyone talked at once. Every- 
one seemed to be getting the full import 
— all except me. I missed a couple of cues. 

"After a few moments, Margaret left the 
table, returned with a stack of numbers, 
passed them around the table. She said 
that everyone was to take turns talking, 
and we'd have to wait until our number 
was up before we could voice an opinion. 
Order was maintained for all of five to 
seven minutes. 

"Dinner over, the photographer began 
to set up his camera. Also, Margaret's 
masseuse arrived. Margaret stretched out 
on the floor in blouse and slacks while the 
masseuse went to work. The photographer 
found one of the auxiliary lights too 
bright; he shrouded . it by placing his 
pocket handkerchief over the bulb. He got 
into position, ready to shoot. 

"About this time a delivery man arrived, 
carrying a portable radio which Margaret 
had had repaired. At first, she must have 
planned to take it on her trip. In any case. 






Radio's "My True Story" has helped 
countless listeners find real happiness. For 
this drama-packed program deals with 
real people — people like you, your neighbors, 
your own loved ones. When you hear how 
they overcome life's most difficult emotional 
problems, it may help you, too, to find the 
happiness you long for. So listen to each 
of these stirring stories — taken right from 
the files of "True Story Magazine". 




TUNE IN 



?? 



MY TRUE STORY 



American Broadcasting Stations 



this was an emergency delivery. The 
masseuse studied the delivery man as he 
stood dejectedly at the door, waiting for 
Margaret to sign his delivery ticket. The 
masseuse started to work on the muscles 
at the back of the man's neck. 'You look 
tired,' she said. 'I can fix you up in just 
a few minutes.' 

"All this time, you must remember, 
everyone is talking at once, the radio is 
playing, the telephone is ringing, Debbie 
is leading her dachshund around on a 
white leash. Margaret says, 'Don't lose 
that leash, darling. Mother had to sing 
two quick choruses in order to buy it.' 

"At this point, someone tilts a sensitive 
nose and says, 'Something's burning.' How 
true. The photographer's handkerchief is 
blazing away merrily. Someone runs for 
a glass of water. Someone else — one of the 
men — pulls off his jacket and smothers the 
flame. When the water is brought in, Mar- 
garet drinks' it. 

"By this time, the delivery man has had 
his massage. 'I've had a headache for three 
days, but it's gone now,' he tells the mas- 
seuse. Everyone is happy. Everyone tells 
the delivery man goodbye, and the photo- 
graphic sitting is about to continue when 
Barbara, in sweater, pedal pushers, and a 
doleful expression, appears iii the doorway. 
Lifting her arms to shoulder height in a 
highly dramatic bit of body pantomime, 
she announces, 'I have been walking on the 
beach.' With that she goes up the stairs — 

"Someone reminds Margaret that she is 
catching a plane, just as a song plugger 
arrives. He says he is starved, would Willie 
May fix him a sandwich, and settles at 
the piano where he pounds out a series of 
tunes. Margaret says that first one has 
something, could he play it again, change 
the key, and slow it down? 

"Margaret's mother says Margaret has 
to catch a plane and, incidentally — since 
Margaret insists upon flying — she (Mrs. 
Whiting) has insured Margaret's life for 
fifty thousand dollars. She explains that 
such insurance is lucky, because no com- 
pany wants to pay out that kind of money, 
so naturally the flight will be made with- 
out incident. 

"Margaret rushes upstairs, changes her 
clothes, and comes down airport-ready — 
she thinks. WiUie May emerges from the 
kitchen and announces that Margaret is 
not to leave the house in that dress. Mar- 
garet says she doesn't have time to change, 
she's going to miss the plane. 'Then you'll 
just have to miss the plane,' Willie May 
asserts positively, 'because, if you don't 
change that dress, I'm going to put a bul- 
let through your head — and that's a fact.' 

"Margaret shrugs, laughs, and goes back 
upstairs. There is a mighty crash from the 
courtyard, where there are now as many 
cars parked as Ciro's lot handles on a 
Saturday night. Eleanor, Margaret's 
mother, has backed into someone's auto 
and has torn off the bumper. 'Send for 
someone to fix it,' she calls. 'I want to see 
Margaret's plane take off.' 

"At this point it is extremely unlikely 
that Margaret is going anywhere. A singer 
whom she knows very well, and with 
whom she has worked for years, has ar- 
rived with his wife and their four children. 
Margaret is chatting as if she had just ar- 
rived for a leisurely weekend. 

"And so, I fade into the sunset. I am 
certain that Margaret will catch her plane, 
that someone will show up to repair the 
damaged car, that Willie May will be 
making sandwiches periodically until mid- 
night, that God's in his heaven and all's 
right with the Whitings." 

He considered his story for a moment 
of exhausted but extreme pleasure. "Yeah 
— that's the truest thing you can say about 
them," he announced. "All's right with the 
Whitings " 



Happy, Happy Time 

(Continued jrovn, page 41) 

The lucky accident was a Sunday after- 
noon drive which a neighbor invited them 
to share. (The O'Neills have no car.) Patti 
held back. "I shudder," she says, "when 
I think how close I came to refusing to 
go." But Mrs. O'Neill convinced her it 
would be nice to get out in the country. 

Their destination was the home of Mr. 
and Mrs. Jerry Urgo in Bergenfield, New 
Jersey, whom the O'Neills met that day for 
the first time. While the women visited 
in the living room, Jerry — who is chief 
of operations for the CBS photo studio — 
was stretched lazily in a hammock under 
the trees, and no more incUned than the 
next man to work on his day off. But 
seeing Patti, then ten years old, play with 
his daughter, Maria, fascinated him. "Her 
every movement was graceful," he says. 
"I finally asked if she would like me to 
take her picture." 

Jerry still holds a clear memory of her 
reply. She tossed back her braids, peered 
up through her bangs and said seriously, 
"Oh, no. I don't think I photograph well." 

Jerry then went to talk to Mrs. O'Neill. 
"I asked her if she had ever thought of 
making Patti a model. She laughed at the 
idea. That suited me, because I've seen 
enough exploitation of children in this 
business so that I wanted nothing to do 
with a mother who was out to make 
money on a kid. But we talked for a while, 
and I suggested she bring Patti to the 
studio. We'd see how she looked through 
the lens and imder the lights." 

To Patti, he gave simple instructions for 
practice: "Stand in front of a mirror and 
watch the way you move. Try to be grace- 
ful. But really find out how you look." 

His test shots turned out magnificently. 
So magnificently that those pictures, com- 
bined with the O'Neill stick-to-it spirit, 
not only launched the child as a model 
but also carried her over the kind of pit- 
fall which has brought tragedy to many 
a youngster. 

First on the list of model agencies which 
Jerry gave them, when instructing them 
how to make the rounds, was a well-known 
firm. The interviewer accepted a set of 
pictures, but said they would have to call 
back to learn whether the manager would 
put Patti on their roster. 

Says Patti, "I didn't want to come down- 
town again the next day, so we went 
on to the next one." 

That one happened to be operated by a 
man who last year was indicted for fraud. 
Although evidence at his trial proved he 
was far more intent on extracting money 
from mothers than he was in finding book- 
ings for their children, he was released 
when examination of his contracts showed 
that — regardless of what the mothers 
thought he promised — he actually had 
agreed only to include a photograph in his 
catalog. 

But his office was luxurious. Small Patti 
was impressed: "There were knee-deep 
rugs and low lights. Besides, the reception- 
ist agreed right away to accept me. I kept 
whispering to Mother that this was the 
one I wanted." 

The charge was fifty dollars. "By the 
next day," says Mrs. O'Neill, "I regretted 
it. The well-known agency phoned to say 
they would accept Patti. Being green as 
grass, I said that was fine, and that we'd 
like to work through both. They explained 
that wasn't ethical and that I was boiind 
by the other contract. 

"My friends were sure I had lost my 
money. I remember thinking that I didn't 
really care whether Patti turned into a 
model or not — but also praying that she 




OPPORTUNITIES 



FOR EVERYBODY 



Publisher's ClaMified Department (Trademark) 




forc/ossified advert'ning rales, write fo William R. Stewart, 9 South C/infon Street, Chicago 6 (Aug.- Worn.) 5 



FEMALE HELP WANTED 

bEMOIMSTRATORS— $25-$40 Daily. Our lingerie, apparel 
style showings are sensation of party plan selling. Isabel 
Sharrow made $258 — 11 days, sparetime! Free Outfit. Beeline 

Fashions, Bensenville, 327 Illinois. 

SEW FOR BIG Moneyl Women 18-60 wanted. Earn to $100 
weekly. Experience unnecessary. Free placement service. 
Factory secrets, methods. Complete information. Write Gar- 
ment Trades, 6411-B Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood 28, Cali- 
fornia; 

BEAUTY DEMONSTRATORS: UP to $5 hour demonstra- 
ting Famous Hollywood Cosmetics, your neighborhood. 
Free Samples and details supplied. Write Studio-Girl, Dept. 

P-85, Glendale, Calif. 

MAKE MONEY INTRODUCING World's cutest children's 
dresses. Big selection, adorable styles. Low prices. Com- 
plete display free. Rush name. Harford, Dept. P-2359, 

Cincinnati 25, Ohio. 

HOME WORKERS WANTEDI Self employment home 
jobs listed. $20-$50 weekly possible. No experience neces- 

sary. Maxwell, Dept. B-8, Cleveland 14, Ohio. 

$2.00 HOURLY POSSIBLE doing light assembly work at 
home. Experience unnecessary. Crown Industries, 7159-B 

Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles 36, Calif. 

EARN EXTRA MONEY— Our instructions tell how. A. B. 
Dunbar, Dept. G8, 4130 Mark Terrace, Cleveland 28, Ohio. 
WOMEN. SEW READY-Cut Wrap-A-Round spare time- 
profitable. Dept. D, Hollywood Mfg. Co., Hollywood 46, Calif. 
HOME WORKERS. MAKE hand-made moccasins. Good 
pay. Experience unnecessary. California Handicrafts, Los 

Angeles 46, Calif. 

SEW BABY SHOES I No Canvassing! $40 Weekly possible! 
Send stamped addressed envelope. Baby Sfioes, Warsaw, 

Indiana. 

ENJOY EXTRA INCOME sewing Baby Shoes. Details 3c. 

Thompson's, Loganville 2, Wisconsin. 

$30.00 WEEKLY MAKING Roses, tasy. Write, Studio 

Company, Greenville 7, Penna. ^^_ 

Fascinating piece work at Home! No selling! We 

pay you I Truart, Box 438, Pasadena, California. 

OF INTEREST TO WOMEN 

t200 FOR YOUR child's photo (all ages) if used by advertisers, 
end one small photo for approval. Print child's and parent's 
name -address on back. Photo returned. No obligation. Spot- 

lite, 5 8 80-HPW Hollywood, Hollywood 28, California. 

IN SPARE TIME at home, complete high school with 58- 
year-old school. Texts furnished. No classes. Diploma. In- 
formation booklet free. American School, Dept. ZC74, Drexel 

at 58th, Chicago 37, Illinois. 

MAKE MONEY CLIPPING Wanted Items from your News- 
paper for Publishers. Some worth up to $10.00 Each!! Write 
for information. Newscraft Publishers, 7-PW, Columbus 5, 

Ohio. 

HOME SEWERS! PRE-CUT Materials furnished. You sew 
and return. No selling. Part, full time. Ron-SonrDept. PW8, 

16351 Euclid, Cleveland 12, Ohio. 

MATERNilTY STYLES-FREE Catalog (Plain Envelope); 
fashions by famous designers; $2.98 to $22,98. Crawford's, 

Dept. 141, 8015 Wornall, Kansas City, Missouri. 

Earn EXTRA MONEY Weekly Mailing Display Folders. 
Send stamped, addressed envelope. Allen Company, Warsaw 

1, Indiana. 

SEW OUR READY cut aprons at home, spare time. Easy, 

Profitable. Hanky Aprons, Ft. Smith 3, Ark. 

EARN SPARE TIME Cash mailing advertising literature. 

Glenway, 5713 Euclid, Cleveland 3, Ohio. 

SEND OUT POSTCARDS. Cash daily. Write Box 174, 

Belmont, Mass. 

Profitable home business. Make Fast-selling che- 
nille monkey trees. Literature free. Velva. Bohemia 32, N. Y. 

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES 

COMPLETE YOUR HIGH School at home in spare time 
with 58-year-old school. Texts furnished. No classes. Di- 
ploma. Information booklet free. American School, Dept. 

XC74, Drexel at 58th, Chicago 37. Illinois. 

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA at home. Licensed teachers. 
Approved materials. Southern States Academy, Box 144-W. 

Station E, Atlanta, Georgia. 

HOME STUDY TRAINING 

PHYSICAL THERAPY PAYS Big. Learn at home. Free Cata- 
log. National Institute, Desk 6, 159 East Ontario, Chicago 11. 

ADDITIONAL INCOME 

EARN READY CASH doing mailing work. No experience 
needed. F. Wilson Business Service, 2875 Glendale Blvd., 
Los Angeles 39, Calif. 



OLD COINS & MONEY WANTED 

$40.00 CERTAIN LINCOLN Pennies. Indianheads $60.00. 
Others $5.00— $3,000.00. Three Illustrated Guarantee Buy- 
ing — Selling Catalogues, complete Allcoin Information — send 
$1.00 Worthycoin Corporation (K-460-C), Boston 8, Mass. 
WE PURCHASE INDIANHEAD pennies. Complete allcoin 
catalogue 25c. Magnacoins, Box 61-DK, Whitestone 57, 

New York. . 

MONEY-MAKING OPPORTUNITIES 



GROW MUSHROOMS, CELLAR, shed. Spare, full time, 
year round. We pay $3.50 lb. We paid Babbitt $4165.00 in 
few weeks. Free Book. Washington Mushroom Ind., Dept. 
164, 2954 Admiral Way, Seattle, Wash. 



BIG EARNING OPPORTUNITY your home neighborhood, 

town. Exquisite Fashion Party Plan guarantees territory for 

small investment. Free information. Box 282, Conshohocken, 

Pennsylvania. 

60% PROFIT COSMETICS. $25 day up. Hire others. 

Samples, details. Studio Girl-Hollywood, Glendale, Calif. 

Dept. P-85b. 

STUFFING-MAILING ENVELOPES. Our instructions tell 
how. Dept. G-8, Education Publishers, 4043 St. Clair, 

Cleveland 3, Ohio. 

Guaranteed HOMEWORKI IMMEDIATE Commis- 
sions! Everything Furnished! Hirsch's, 1301-0 Hoe, New 

York City 59. 

$25 WEEK POSSIBLE, sparetime, at home, preparing mail 

for advertisers. Te-Co, Box 946, Muncie 2, Indiana. 

SIZEABLE COMMISSION. SEND our postcards ouL In- 
quire: Pioneer, Box 13, Wakefield, Mass. 
$35 WEEKLY PREPARING envelopes. Instructions $1. 

Refundable. Adservice, Spring Valley 151, New York. 

EARN SPARE TIME cash mailing advertising literature. 

Glenway, 5713 Euclid, Cleveland 3, Ohio. 

EARN MONEY AT Home! Must Have good Handwriting. 

Write for Details. Atlas, Box 188-A, Melrose, Mass. 

SEND OUT POSTCARDS. Cash daily. Write Box 174, 

Belmont, Mass. 

PERSONAL 

BORROW BY MAIL. Loans $50 to $600 to employed men 
and women.Easy, quick. Completely confidential. No endors- 
ers. Repay in convenient monthly payments. Details free in 
plain envelope. Give occupation. State Finance Co., 323 

Securities BIdg., Dept. H-69, Omaha 2, Nebraska. 

PSORIASIS VICTIMS: HOPELESS? New discovery! Free 
Trial Offer. Write Pixacol, Box 3583-C, Cleveland, Ohio. 

MALE & FEMALE HELP WANTED 

EARN EXTRA MONEY selling Advertising Book Matches. 
Free sample kit furnished. Matchcorp, Dept. WP-16, 
Chicago 32, Illinois. 

SALESWOMEN WANTED 

BIG MONEY SELLING Sweet Georgia Brown Cosmetics. 
Colored People Buy Fast. Valmor, 2451 S. Michigan, Chicago 
16, in. 

AGENTS WANTED 

CALLING ALL WOMEN! Sell new Tall Style Christmas 
Card assortments. Extra money spare time. Profits to 100%. 
Bonus. Feature boxes on approval. 77 free samples Christmas 
Personals, Stationery. New England Art Publishers, North 
Abington 833-B, Mass. 

HELP WANTED 

FOREIGN-U.S. EMPLOYMENT. If interested in State- 
side & Foreign projects write. High Pay. Stamped self- 
addressed envelope appreciated. Job Information, Dept. 11 G, 

Waseca, Minn. 

HIGH PAYING JOBS. All Types. Foreign, USA. Chance to 
travel. Many benefits. Application Forms. Free Information. 
Write Dept. 73K. National Employment Information, 1020 
Broad, Newark, N.J. 

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 

$200 WEEKLY CLEANING Venetian Blinds. Free book. 
Burtt, 2434BR, Wichita 13, Kansas. - 

MAIL ORDER CATALOGS 

FREE FALL CATALOG— Aldens 604 page 1956 Fashion 
Guide! All family, home needs. Lowest prices, money-back 
satisfaction guaranteed! Send for Free Catalog today. 
Aldens, Dept. 451, Box 8340A, Chicago 80. 

HOME SEWERS WANTED 

SEW BABY SHOES at home. No Canvassing. $40.00 weekly 
possible. Write: Tiny-Tot, Gallipolis 19, Ohio. 



HANDS TIED? ILBLONPESI 



)^l —because you lack a 
HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA 

• You can qualify for an American School 
Diploma in spare time at home! If you have 
left school, write or mail coupon for FREE 
booklet that tells how. No obligation of any 
kind. 
^ OUR 58TH YEAR 

I AMERICAN SCHOOL, Dept. VC53 

j Drexel at 58th, Chicago 37, Illinois 

I Please send FREE High School booklet. 
I 

I Name 

I 

I Address 

I City & State 

I Canadian Residents: Complete Canadian Conrse Available. 
1 Write American School, 1610 Sherbrooke St. West. Montreal. 




You gm Your 
^1,000,000 
HAIR this 
Special 
Shampoo 

If you don't already know it, the delicate texture of blonde 
hair needs the gentle caress of a SPECIAL "creamy" shampoo! 
That's why millions of blondes insist on BLONDEX. Now, 
without tints, rinses or that ugly bleached look, you can give ' 

your hair the shining, radiant "million-dollar" color that men V 

love! Blondex removes the dingy film that makes hair dark R 

and old-looking, washes it shades lighter and brighter in 
II easy minutes at home. Safe for children's hair, too. Get 
BLONDEX today at lOc, drug or department stores. 



would have enough bookings so that we'd 
get our fifty dollars back." 

Their luck was better than that of many 
other clients of this agency. Jerry Urgo's 
superlative photographs may have made 
the difference. Says Mrs. O'Neill, "Later 
we encountered plenty of illustrators who 
refused to book through that agent. Most- 
ly, I guess, he did just collect commissions, 
but he was responsible for getting Patti 
her first assignments." 

Number-one assignment was for one of 
the big mail-order catalogs. "That was a 
weird experience. The photographers, 
really a large and reputable firm, had just 
moved to an old mansion and its adjacent 
garage. The place looked like a haunted 
house. We were scared to go in — and lost 
after we did enter. But we just kept daring 
each other to open one more door until we 
stumbled into the big room, which turned 
out to be a beautifully equipped studio." 

With the ice broken, the O'Neills took 
the initiative. They made the rounds of 
the studios themselves. The Urgo photo- 
graphs opened doors, and the O'Neills' own 
charm kept them open. 

When she was twelve, Patti transferred 

to Professional Children's School. Her 

^ report at the end of the first day was: 

"Mother, these kids are too smart for me. 

They are 'way ahead of me." 

Shortly, too, Patti found that some child 
actors save all their lovableness for the 
stage. When a little girl boasted of an 
important assignment, Patti naturally 
asked where it was. "That," said the 
moppet, elevating her nose several inches, 
"is a professional secret." 

Wisely, Mrs. O'Neill advised the snubbed 
Patti: "For a while, you'd better keep 
your mouth shut and your ears open." The 
advice worked. Soon Patti loved the school. 
"The kids are fun and the teachers are 
wonderful. I think, too, that we work 
harder and learn faster than in public 
school. We take more responsibility." 

A typical school day for Patti began 
when her mother called her at 7:45 A.M. 
Sleepy-eyed, she washed her face and 
headed for the kitchen to ask, "What's in 
the refrigerator?" 

"She's a weird one, this kid," says Mrs. 
O'Neill with a laugh. "She doesn't want 
cereal, she wants sandwiches." 

Back upstairs, Patti put on the lipstick, 
peering a little near-sightedly into a mir- 
ror which has the usual schoolgirl me- 
mentoes thrust between glass and frame. 
There are matchbooks, dance invitations 
and a cherished note from Mrs. Macdonald 



Carey thanking Patti for the gift she sent 
to the Careys' new baby. 

Patti dressed carefully. "None of us 
could risk being sloppy," she says. "A call 
might come in at school. None of us wore 
socks and flats. I think, too, our skirts 
were shorter than a lot of girls wear to 
public school. They're more becoming." 

Patti's own wardrobe is simple, but 
ample. She likes crinolines and full skirts 
— she has about a dozen. Her nineteen 
long-sleeved blouses and twenty short- 
sleeved blouses are racked in rotation, so 
that she never wears the same one two 
days in succession. She has six wool 
dresses, some summer cottons and four 
formals. She wears plain pumps with 
baby spike heels — but keeps her bedroom 
slippers on until she is ready to leave the 
house. Her mother's parting injunction is 
usually: "Put your shoes on." 

Patti used her subway riding time to 
catch up on her required reading. So that 
she could avoid toting a ton of stuff to 
an assignment, she had two sets of books, 
one kept at school, the other at home. She 
was in class from 9:45 A.M. to 1:00 P.M. 
She endeavored to return home and have 
her homework done by 5:30 P.M. "But 
some days I spent too much time in the 
coffee shop, talking to the kids." 

Patti still helps get dinner — "I like to 
eat and I like to cook" — and is responsible 
for the dishes. After watching TV, she 
spends a little telephone time talking to 
friends, then is in bed by eleven. 

No time was allotted for the usual extra- 
curricular activities. "The school cut them 
out. We all had too many work assign- 
ments, and that's what we cared about." 
Dates are still restricted to weekends. 

She usually sees at least one Broadway 
play a week. "That's both study and fun. 
I'm lucky. The boy across the street, 
Ronny Lee, is an actor, too, so we come 
home together. We buy the cheapest seats 
in the theater. We can hear just as well 
and we watch through opera glasses." 

There have been a number of extra - 
special dates, too, such as a football game 
at Yale and the inter-fraternity weekend 
at Pennsylvania. Biggest of all, of course, 
was Patti's own senior prom. For it, she 
got "the prettiest formal yet — all white 
nylon tulle, soft as chiffon. The prom was 
at the Hotel Delmonico. We had just a 
perfect time." 

Two major milestones, so far, are her 
parts in The Secret Storm ("I hope, I hope, 
I hope they keep me in the script") and 
her six-month stint on Broadway in "Anni- 



$1,000.00 REWARD 



78 



... is offered for Informatron leading 
to the arrest of dangerous "wanted" 
criminals. Hear details about the 
$1,000.00 reward on . . . 

TRUE DETECTIVE MYSTERIES 

Every Wednesday ISight on MUTUAL Stations 



"The Dentist Mixed His Own Knockout Pills" — until one 
lady patient was found strangled. Read this amazing 
Minneapolis case in August TRUE DETECTIVE MAGAZINE 
at newsstands now. 




versary Waltz" ("I grew up on that show"). 

The play's break-in tour was her first 
time away from home. "My roommate was 
Mary Lee Deering. Her father was my tap- 
dancing teacher. We were both used to 
having our mothers wash our socks and 
lingerie and get our clothes ready. It did 
us good to take care of ourselves." 

Hotel living had lost its sheen for both 
girls by the time the show reached Phila- 
delphia, so they found a little housekeeping 
apartment. Macdonald Carey, male star of 
the show, was their second dinner guest, 

"We heard him say he was tired of 
restaurants," Patti explains. "We had al- 
ready made dinner for a couple of the kids 
and the roast beef turned out pretty well, 
even if we did have to prop the oven door 
shut with a chair. We planned a meat 
loaf for our big dinner. But, when I got 
home, I discovered the refrigerator didn't 
work too well and the meat had spoiled. 
Honestly, I could have cried. I didn't know 
what to do. But we did have some liver, 
because Mary Lee had said it was good 
for us. I can't teU you how we worried 
about whether Mr. Carey would like it. 
But he assured us he just loved liver, so 
we all had a real good time." 

Wally Cox, too, holds a special place in 
Patti's heart. "Mr. Cox was just wonderful. 
While we were waiting around during Mr. 
Peepers' rehearsals, he would sit and talk 
with the kids in the show and he'd play 
games with us. We all just loved him." 

Haila Stoddard of The Secret Storm has 
won Patti's genuine respect. "I learn so 
much just watching her. She's such a fine 
actress." Patti is always most careful to 
address stars, staff and all elders by the 
proper "Mr." or "Miss." As she says, "I 
just don't think it is right for us kids to 
call someone like that by a first name." 

Her courtesy is sincere and genuine, 
and it also is well-noted. While the cam- 
eras approve her face and figure, directors 
and producers approve her manners. Again, 
Jerry Urgo admits to some early coaching. 
"Long ago," he says, "I told her, 'Now, 
don't turn into a snob like some of these 
brats around show business.' But I didn't 
really need to. Patti is just as sweet and 
modest today as she was when she told me, 
at ten, that she didn't photograph well." 

Dick Dunn, producer of The Secret 
Storm, comments on her maturity as well 
as her manners. "Her poise was the first 
thing which struck me. Warren Berlinger, 
who plays Jerry Ames, read opposite her 
at the audition. Afterwards, I learned that 
Patti and Warren were good friends, but 
do you think either of those kids let on? 
We didn't hear a giggle out of either of 
them. It just showed in the warm and un- 
derstanding way they played their scenes." 

For the future, Patti hopes "to keep on 
working, just like I'm doing now." Her 
mother defines it a little more closely. "I 
hope she gets some really big part. I don't 
necessarily mean that she becomes a star. 
You don't have to be a star to be a 
success." 

And the experts? The production people 
who know her best are too busy to indulge 
in wild predictions, but it is significant 
that they use certain phrases in describing 
her: "She's a lady." "She is competent." 
"She knows what she is doing" "She has 
charm, beauty, focus." 

A few years ago, some of those same 
people were using the same phrases to 
describe two other young actresses. Their 
names were Grace Kelly and Eva Marie 
Saint. This year both won Academy 
Awards. 

No one knows yet whether there's an 
"Oscar" in Patti's future. But she's found 
her own rewards on TV. And, at eighteen, 
it's such a happy, happy time to be alive 
and glowing— and knowing that "the best 
is yet to be." 



The Heart Knows Best 

(Continued from page 49) 
lost on Paul. In his mind's eye, he was 
already seeing Cincinnati's towering hills, 
the busy restaiu-ant where the town's tele- 
vision and newspaper people exchange 
gossip and, most of all, the sweep of a 
la'ATi leading to a house he had yet to find. 

"It's crazy," he said with a grin. "Leav- 
ing New York is the thing you just don't 
do. If you have that love of broadcasting 
which keeps you in this hectic business, it 
doesn't matter whether you're at a 250- 
watt 'coffee jwt' out in Nebraska — or at a 
substantial high-power station in a big city 
— New York is your magnet. There's some- 
thing inside you which makes you want to 
find out whether you can measure up to 
the big-time." 

Paul had found his personal answer to 
that question. The little pantomime show 
which he had started during early TV days 
in Cincinnati — "because I was a radio disc 
jockey and didn't have the talent to do 
anything else on television" — had achieved 
network status and held it, long before it 
was brought to New York. When, at the 
Du Mont network, sweeping policy changes 
began taking other live shows off the air 
in favor of film, new doors started opening 
for Paul. Another network invited nego- 
tiations. Profitable opportiinities to free- 
lance were also presented. It was apparent 
that, whatever might happen at Du Mont, 
New York had a place for a man with 
Dixon's record for entertaining. 

"I'm turning down a million dollars 
worth of billing," Paul confided. "My 
reason is simple. We do not like this kind 
of living — and, above everything else, I 
want my wife and children to be happy. 
Perhaps I was able to take this course be- 
cause I actually had made my decision 
long ago. You remember the way we left 
Chicago." 

1 hat leave-taking had also occurred at 
a crucial time in Paul's career. The ambi- 
tious young man, together with his new 
bride, Marge, had come from Iowa on the 
strength of a dream and a hope. They had 
a rickety car and money enough to buy 
gasoline to drive to Chicago. While Marge 
worked as a sales clerk in a department- 
store basement, Paul pounded the audition 
roimds. At last he landed a job at a small 
radio station where recorded music and 
straight-ofl-the-teletype newscasts were 
the chief commodities. The music proved 
to be Paul's dish. His disc-jockeying drew 
a following — and he had been asked to 
audition for one of the town's choicest 
commercial plums — when a telephone call 
changed his life. 

Mort Watters, manager of Station WCPO 
in Cincinnati, was driving into Chicago 
when, via his car radio, he first heard Paul. 
He phoned to say, "I think you're the lous- 
iest newcaster I ever heard, but I like your 
voice. How would you like to work for 
me in Cincinnati?" 

"I wiU never forget that journey," Paul 
recalled. "My old flivver rattled and shook. 
The roof leaked and I wondered whether 
it would hold together. And, all the time, 
I was in a torment of conflict. Was I do- 
ing the right thing? Would gambling on 
Chicago have meant more in the end? And 
I also remember how the answer came to 
me. By going to Cincinnati, I could imme- 
diately give Marge a good home. She 
would not have to work. We could start 
thinking about a family." 

It was this habit of putting human values 
first which won Paul his audiences and, 
in turn, the commercial success his ambi- 
tion demanded. 

"You can just about measure what Cin- 
cmnati did for me," Paul said, "by com- 



«..--.ss«issiSS««vgK«A.„ i 



STOP Pm INSTANTLY 

OOMBAT INFECTION 
Pf^OMOTE HEALING 

^ WITH STAINLESS 

oampho-Phen/oi/e 



^o cam-fo-fin-eek) % 



WHEN USED ON 



PIMPLES -ACNE 

CAMPHO-PHENIQUE HELPS PREVENT 
THEIR SPREAD AND RE-INFECTION. 

It's wonderful, too, for fever blisters, cold sores, 
gvun boils, cuts and scratches, minor bums caxised 
by book matches, hot cooking utensils, hot water 
or steam. Campho-Phenique relieves itching of 
insect bites, poison ivy, etc. Just apply Campho- 
Phenique next time and see how fast this pain- 
reheving antiseptic goes to work. And it doesn't 
stain the skin! Get a bottle today. 




money 



can be yours for help- 
ing us take orders for 
magazine subscriptions. 

Write for FREE information. No obligation. 

Macfadden Publications, 205 East 42 St., N. Y. 

17. N. t. 




INGROWN NAIL 

Hurting You? 

fmmecfiate 
ftefieff 



A few drops of OUTGEO®l)ring blessed relief from 
tormenting pain of Ingrown nail. OUTGBO tough- 
ens the skin underneath the naU, allows the nail to 
be cut and thus prevents further pain and discom- 
fort. OUTGRO is available at all drug counters. 




CHUBBV 

Club neiui 



2^ 



Chubby Club Member 
Linda Smith, 
Lebanon, Penn. 
If you ore not already getting our Chubby 
Club News, fill out the coupon below, paste 
it on a 2c government post cord and moil it 
today. You'll receive your Chubby Club News 
and our picture book of dresses, coots, suits, 
hots - EVERYTHING to 
wear for girls, sub-teens 
and teens who are too 
chubby to fit into regular 
sizes , . . but who fit per- 
fectly into our special 
Chubby Sizes 8'/2-16'/2. 



<£)ryant 



Lane Bryont, 465 Fifth Ave., N. Y. C. 17, N. Y. 
Please send me your Chubby Club Nev/s and 
Fashion Boole 7M. 

Name .Age 

Street 

City State 



12 NEW TOWELS only n. 00 

LARGE SIZE! Assorted colors. New! Not seconds. Non- 
woven COTTON and RAYON. Money-back guarantee. Sup- 
ply limited. Order Now! R. J. HOMAKERS CO., Dept. 810, 
Box 264, Farmtngdale. L.I., N.Y. 



D^£O^^S^^FbMVER 



^ Only by KILUNG THE HAIR ROOT can you bs sure J 
' UNWANTED HAIR is GONE FOREVER. Brings relief / 
>cial happiness. Do not use our method until J 
F you have read our instruction book carefully and J 
} learned to use the MAHLER METHOD safely and j 
J efficiently. Used successfully over fifty years. 



Send S'^TODAY for booklet i^ 



MAHLER'S. INC Dept 59-X PROVIDENCE 15, R. I. ' 



FRECKLES 



Don't Add Up 
To Beauty! 

Do freckles detract from 
your beauty? Start us- 
ing Stillman's Freckle 
Cream today. It's dou- 
bly effective — lightens 
the skin besides being a beauty cream. 
Thousands of girls and women use Still- 
man's Freckle Cream for a more radiant, 
softer skin. It helps men too! Try it 
today — it adds up to Beauty! 

For your copy of our new 1955 
booklet, "Be Beautiful," write 

THE STILLMAN CO. 

Box 27, AURORA, ILLINOIS 




79 



paring the move from Chicago and the 
later move to New York. When we hit the 
road last fall, we had two kids and two 
cars. Pam rode with Marge in the Pon- 
tiac. I took Greg in the Cadillac." 

The question of living in Manhattan or 
the suburbs had been settled in no time 
at all. Said Paul, "When a couple of 
healthy, lively kids have had a half-acre 
back yard where they can work off their 
energy, you can't shut them up in an 
apartment." 

Because an acquaintance had recom- 
mended White Plains — "where the com- 
muting was good" — Marge and Paul spent 
a weekend of whirlwind house-hunting. 
The one they chose was charming. There 
were large trees, a rolling yard, even a 
pond. It was the kind of place people 
dream about and work to buy. 

"That may have been one of the trou- 
bles," said Paul. "We simply bought this 
one. The house which we had dreamed 
of and worked for was in Cincinnati. That 
was the first we had ever owned, and it is 
surprising how lonesome you can get for 
a house." 

1 hey particularly missed the playroom 
Building it had been a typical Dixon proj- 
ect, where Paul started modestly and had 
been carried away by his own enthusiasm. 

It began when he decided that the 
broadcasting booth — built while he had a 
heavy schedule of radio programs — had to 
go. The cleared space would provide a 
fine racetrack for Pam's and Greg's bikes 
on rainy days. 

The color they chose — a rich deep red — 
changed the direction of the project. Said 
Paul, "1 got the notion it would make a 
fine rathskeller. Five thousand dollars la- 
ter, we had a wonderful playroom — for 
adults." 

The expenditure was justified when the 
place turned into that kind of room where 
a husband and wife can find a special 
close companionship. 

"Marge and I would build up a fire in 
the fireplace and sit there until it burned 
low. We'd watch television, have friends 
in, or just talk. So that we'd be certain 
the kids were all right upstairs, I in- 
stalled a two-way communications system. 
When that was turned on, we could even 
hear them breathe." 

It was this close companionship which 
they missed most in White Plains. "I had 
heard about commuting," Paul said, "but, 
until I tried it, I never beUeved people 
could stand such a routine. Let me tell 
you what a day was like. 

"First of all, there was the problem of 
train schedules. We kept the two cars so 
that I could drive one and leave it at the 
station when I took the 8:55. The parking 
lot, it turned out, was filled by 8:00. So 
my car sat in the garage and Marge never 
got away from the wheel of hers." 

Marge's timetable became as formidable 
and inflexible as the program schedule of a 
television station. At 8: 30 A.M., she drove 
Paul to the depot, then continued four 
miles farther to deposit Pam at her school 
by nine. Greg's nursery school, another 
five miles away, opened at 9:30. Home by 
ten, she would have just enough time to 
do the dishes and make the beds before 
picking up Greg at noon. 

Paul had turned his description of it into 
a chant. "Then it was feed Greg, put Greg 
to bed for his nap, do the dishes, wake 
and dress Greg, go get Pam, start dinner, 
get the kids into their wraps and drive to 
' the depot to get me. We'd put the car 
away She would serve dinner, help Pam 
with her homework, do the dishes, put 
the kids to bed, and then we'd both col- 
lapse. It was worse than having threshers 
in Iowa, because this went on every day. 
Marge, instead of being wife and mother, 
80 



became Badge Number 47, operator of 
Marge's Taxi Service." 

Many a suburban housewife follows a 
similar routine but, to Marge and Paul, 
all the driving and running was a sorry 
contrast to their relaxed life in Cincinnati. 

"I can't tell you how much we missed 
our friends," said Paul. "It seemed as 
though everyone we knew lived in New 
Jersey or Connecticut, two or three hours 
away. When we took on the additional 
task of getting a baby-sitter, it became a 
tougher production job than putting a new 
TV show on the air. Do you know how 
many times we managed to get in to see 
Broadway plays? Twice. Just twice. In 
Cincinnati, we automatically went to every 
play. Our friends did, too, and we'd all 
get together after the show. Or, in the 
evening, we'd drop in at a friend's home 
or they would come to ours, and the talk 
would be good and about many things. 
Everything was close and easy. We didn't 
know how much we depended on our 
friends until we were out of reach of 
them." 

A more serious phase of their isolation 
concerned the children. Despite the fact 
that the White Plains living centered 
around them, the youngsters, too, felt the 
lack of familiar companionship. 

Greg, in his bid for the kind of attention 
he had had from both playmates and par- 
ents, turned rambunctious. He came in 
from nursery school to report to Marge: 
"A boy was naughty today. He had to go 
stand in a corner." 



SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE! 

For lovers of drama: 

Pat Wheel • "The Doctor's Wife" 
Tod Andrews • "First Love" 

For music lovers: 

Julius La Rosa • • • Lois Hunt 

For Western fans: 

Fess Parker • "Davy Crockett" 
Gail Davis • "Anr«ie Oakley" 

Plus Dennis James on the cover! 

TV RADIO MIRROR 

September issue on sale August ^ 



"What," asked Marge, "did the boy do?" 

"He slugged two other boys." 

"What was his name?" 

Greg grew evasive. "I can't remember." 

"What did he look like?" 

Chucking his chin deep into the collar 
of his own flaming cowboy plaid, Greg 
said, "He had a red shirt." 

Marge poured him another glass of milk. 
"Greg, how long did you have to stand in 
the corner?" 

"Ten minutes," Greg admitted, caught in 
his own story. 

The next time the situation was poten- 
tially dangerous. "It was a Saturday morn- 
ing," Paul recalled. "I was puttering 
around in the yard when I heard a yell 
from the direction of the pond. I ran, and 
sure enough our Greg had dunked him- 
self. Well, I had no more than got him 
into dry clothes when again I heard an 
agonized, 'Daddy!' This time I found him 
ten feet up in a tree. His overall straps 
were tangled in a dead branch and he was 
dangling halfway between heaven and 
earth. I took him down, but by that time 
I was so irked my hand itched to swat him. 
That was the time Greg nearly got it." 

Six-year-old Pam's loneliness resulted in 
a constant yearning for her former play- 
mates, the Kiefer children who had lived 



only a few doors away. Her every plan 
would begin: "Now, when I see Connie 
and Vicki and Pat ..." 

Marge did not realize how stubbornly 
the little girl clung to her memories until 
a television repairman, arriving to adjust 
the antenna, asked, "Pam, how do you like 
your new home?" 

Said Pam, "This isn't my new home." 

"What is it then?" asked the man. 

"This," said Pam emphatically, "is just 
my winter home. In the spring, I'm going 
back to Cincinnati." 

Paul and Marge smiled and tried to talk 
her out of it, but the day came when they 
agreed with her. 

"It was that darned commuting, of 
course," Paul said. "I hated rushing for 
the train, dashing up and down subway 
steps, hunting for taxis. So, one morning. 
I took the car." 

The sun was shining, the peak of the. 
traffic was past and the trip into New York 
was wonderful. "I made up my mind I 
was going to drive every day," said Paul. 

By late afternoon, however, the weather 
had changed. An icy rain slashed down 
and, in rush-hour traffic, Paul inched along 
in a bumper-to-bumper chain of cars. On- 
coming cars, in an equally tight chain, 
glared blindingly and unceasingly. 

"So I took a wrong turn," said Paul. "In 
Cincinnati, you go around the block £ind 
start over. Making a wrong turn on the 
Triborough Bridge, I wound up on a three - 
hour tour of Long Island." 

By that time. Marge had gone through 
all the usual worrying about accidents and 
the children had done the usual whimper- 
ing of "Where's Daddy?" Coaxed to eat 
dinner without him, they trudged off to 
bed, still protesting they were entitled to 
wait for Paul. When at last he burst, 
through the door, announcing, "I'm beat,"? 
Marge could honestly say, "I am, too." 

He wasn't very good company while 
eating that warmed-over dinner, Paul ad- 
mits. 'All the time I was thinking: So 
this is New York . . . this separation from 
my friends and family . . . these hours of 
fighting traffic or listening to the clatter 
of railroad wheels . . . this constant run- 
ning and driving and never having time 
enough to enjoy my home. Finally, I 
said to Marge, 'Is it worth it?' " 

For a couple of hours, they talked it 
over. Summer was coming and the trains 
and highways would be even more 
crowded. They would miss the country 
club where they used to swim before din- 
ner. The children, with no school to oc- 
cupy their time, would miss their friends 
even more. 

Marge swung the balance. "Remember 
when Pam told the man, 'This is just my 
winter home?' " 

Paul stood up. "Maybe she has the right 
idea. I'll see what I can do about it." 

^ o again the furniture was crated and i 
the two-car parade of happier Dixons j 
headed down the road. ' 

In Cincinnati, WLW and the Crosley 
management welcomed Paul to their three 
Ohio stations. Friends and neighbors were 
enUsted to help find a new house. 

Pam, when told the news, exulted, "Oh, 
Mummy, when I see Vicki I'm going to 
hug her and hug her and hug her." 

Paul, summing up his own farewell to 
New York said, "I meant what I said in 
my letter of resignation. My wife and kids 
come first. I want them to be happy. I 
admit I still have a taste for New York. I 
loved working here as much as I hated , 
living here. If someone offers me a show 
which I can fly in to do once a week, it 
will suit me just fine. I'd rather commute 
from Cincinnati than from White Plains. 1 
guess I proved it. I'm still a country boy 
at heart." 



It's on the Record 

P (Continued jrom page 32) 

back in his leather-upholstered swivel 
chair, reading for a second time one letter 
which was penned in a meticulous, 
feminine hand. It read: "Mother still likes 
to tell her friends how I used to dance 
in my crib while listening to 'Make 
Believe Ballroom.' I thought you'd like 
to know, Mr. Block, that nowadays another 
18-month-old baby can be seen smiling 
and dancing in her crib when our radio 
has your program tuned in. My own 
baby." 

A lot of loyal listening has been spelled 
out in that friendly fan letter. Three whole 
generations of it. For Martin, it's the kind 
of letter that brings on a searching, re- 
flective mood. He sees himself, some 
twenty-three years ago, a lean-framed, 
dark-haired chap, pitting his agile wits 
against one of the meanest adversaries in 
modern history — the great Depression. He 
remembers his personal war against the 
specter of hunger and unemployment. He 
recalls the arena where some of his liveli- 
est battles took place — San Diego. It was 
a time of padlocked bank doors and "No 
Help Wcinted" signs. 

"I did a lot of talking, back in the early 
1930's," Martin reminisces with a wry 
smile. "I talked auto accessories, shoes, 
shirts, ties, vacuum cleaners, books, 
boats and razor blades — and sold them 
all. Sold 'em in stores — door to door — 
and yes, even on the sidewalks. The only 
commodity I had to offer, in that highly 
competitive labor market, was my gift of 
gab. Developed it early, on my school 
debating team." 

One item Martin had not hawked was 
horoscopes — about which he knew noth- 
ing. If he had any awareness of them at 
all, it was only the suspicion that selling 
the zodiac was the second largest activity 
in lower California. But Fate cared very 
little for Martin's personal opinions. She 
arranged things so that Martin met a 
man who did purvey the mystic charts. 

The horoscope tycoon had just pur- 
chased a little radio station south of the 
border, in Tijuana, Mexico. He knew 
nothing about running a radio station, 
although he had some weird idea that 
Martin did. He based this notion on the 
fact that he knew that Martin had re- 
cently auditioned for a San Diego an- 
nouncing job — and had been given the 
"don't call us, we'll call you" brush-off. 

"He offered me a proposition which I 
pounced on with the shy reticence of a 
hungry tiger," Martin relates. "In no time 
at all, I was program director, sales 
manager and chief announcer of Station 
XEFD, a 1000-watter. Only two voices 
ever went through that microphone, the 
astrologer's and mine. He sold his horo- 
scopes and I announced the less cosmic 
commercials — everything from aspirin 
tablets to used cars." 

That initial toe-hold led to a second 
radio stint, back in the U. S., at KMPC 
in Beverly Hills. Martin now had a deep 
conviction that he'd found his true me- 
dium. He was not satisfied, however, that 
he had found his proper niche in it. He 
pondered the problem, and then decided 
to reverse Horace Greeley's advice to 
young men. He came East. 

"New York in 1934 didn't roll out the 
red carpet for me," Martin says. "I had 
to really sell myself. One day, I walked 
into Station WNEW and announced my- 
self to the receptionist as 'Mr. Block of 
California.' " 

A gleam of amusement lights up Mar- 
tin's eyes as he adds, "That receptionist! 
Beautiful. Blonde. And haughty! I wasn't 
impressing her with that 'Mr. Block of 



a medication 
that really works! 




FROM THIS TO THIS 

in just 10 days! 

Exciting results of actual skin tests show the new antibiotic UTOL is the answer pimple 

sufferers have been waiting for. Wonderful Utol comes in a true skin color, just like a powder 

base, and helps to hide ugly pimples while allowing the miracle antibiotic in Utol to help clear 

up pimples faster. Amazing Utol is bringing thousands of boys and girls and adults -«--' ■. '. 

the help they've longed for — giving them new 

poise and confidence. Sold at ,.«•..■>••""*'*** 

all drug stores on a money 

back guarantee... there is no 

product like Utol for fast 

pimple relief. 




A McKesson Product 



FREE 



NATIOKAL BELLAS HESS 

MONEY-SAVING • FALL 8 WINTER 



STYLE CATALOG 




For You and Your Family. . . See hundreds of 
bright fall fashions designed in New York, the world's 
style capital, cflFered to you at the lowest prices anywhere. 

Shop by mail and join the millions who save by buying 
regularly from this colorful catalog. Select from styles ablaze with 
bright, fall colors, all tailored to your family budget. Exciting 
home items at lowest prices, too. All absolutely guaranteed — 
your money back if you are not pleased. Our 67th Year. 



SAVE MONEY, SAVE TIME— ACT NOW! 



NATIONAL BELLAS HESS 

247-88 Bellas Hess Building, Kansas City, Mo. 

Please send me,free,the new National Bellas Hess Money-Saving Catalog. 



I 



NATIONAL 
BELLAS HESS 

247-88 Bellas Hess BIdg. 
Kansas City, Mo. 



Name__ 
Address- 

City 

State 



81 




ONLY 50« 
WHILE 
THEY LAST 

This sensational 
Tearbook sells out 
practically as soon 
as it is put on 
sale. Bon't be dis- 
appointed this 
year — mail coupon 
below with 50c — -^ 

today I 

THIS GORGEOUS YEARBOOK 
CONTAINS YOUR FAVORITE 

TV-Radio Stars 

The gorgeoiis new TV-RADIO ANNUAL is 
now available to you. This exciting 1955 year 
boolt is better than ever ! Below is a brief de- 
scription of this really important Annual: 

NEWS EVENTS OF THE YEAR— The behind-the-scenes 
stories of Eve Arden and Brooks West • Anne Jeffreys and 
Robert Sterling • Florence Halop • Bob Smith • Paul 
Dixon • Steve Allen and Jayne Meadows • Wally Coi; • 
Jack Webb • Alilton Berle. 

NEW SHOWS OF THE YEAR — Stars new and old, who 
helped make recent history, Robert Q, Lewis • Sid 
Caesar • Imogene Coca • Florian ZaBach • Edgar Bergen 

• George Gobel • Jack Paar • Betty White • Michael 
O'Shea • James Dunn • William Bishop • Eddie Mayehoff 

• Gil Stratton Jr, 

WHO'S WHO ON — Breakfast Club • Father Knows Best 

• Beat The Clock • Two For The Money • The Garry 
Moore Show • Your Hit Parade • The Halls Of Ivy • Our 
Miss Brooks • Masquerade Party • My Favorite Hus- 
band • Fibber McGee and Molly • Lassie • The Big 
Payoff • The Jackie Gleason Show. 

ALL-TIME FAVORITES— Arthur Godfrey • Ozzie and 
Harriet Nelson • Ralph Edwards • Bert Parks • Ten- 
nessee Ernie Ford • Warren Hull • Bill Cullen • Boy 
Rogers • Gene Autry • Red Buttons • Jack Bailey • 
Jack Barry • Ed Sullivan • Art Llnkletter • Donald 
O'Connor • Jimmy Durante • Tom Moore, 

GORGEOUS NEW COLOR PORTRAITS OF THE STARS 

— Thrilling 4-color photographs of Liberace • Lucille 
Ball and Desi Arnaz • Eddie Fisher • Gale Storm. These 
full page, true-to- life portraits are so unusual that you 
will want to frame each one of theml 

PLUS — Pictures and biographies from the most beloved 
daytime dramas on radio anri TV. 



* TV-RADIO MIRROR Dept. RM-855* 

•205 E. 42 St., New York 17, N. Y. • 

a Send me postpaid, a copy of TV -RADIO* 
.ANNUAL 1955. I enclose 50c. , 

•u • 

a Name « 

T Please Print J 

Address 

City State 



WRITE: BREVITYPE INSTITUTE, SAN DIEGO, CALIF., DEPT. 1720 

LEARN THE WORLD'S SIMPLEST, 
SPEEDIEST SHORTHAND NOW 

FREE— please send me lypical lessons, details on Brevitype— world's 
Simplest, speediest shorthand— first machine shorthand to eliminale coding. 
Tell me how I learn Brevitype in % the time through your personally guided 
home-study course. Show me how switching to Brevitype, as hundreds have, 
prepares me for security as a stenographer, secretary, court or hearing 
reporter here, and abroad, in business or Civil Service — helps mo Increase 
my salary 50% to 100%. Include costs and budget plans 



82 




MODERN: 

' TYPEWRITER KErOOARDl 
NO COOINGI t«<;T ABCll 



THE BREVITYPE 

MACHINE, WHICH 

CARRIES THIS SEAL, 

COMES WITH 

THIS COURSE 



California' routine. I did get my inter- 
view with the station manager, though — 
and, when I passed her desk again on 
the way out, I was a member of the an- 
nouncing staff. Nowadays, the pretty re- 
ceptionist and I have a good laugh when 
we think back on that first frosty meet- 
ing. You see, I'm married to her now." 

Esther and Martin Block have much 
to be thankful for today. They have three 
fine children at home now: Martin, Jr., 14, 
Joel Christopher, 10, and Michael, age six- 
going-on-seven. The Blocks have a spa- 
cious home in Englewood, New Jersey. 
They have a host of comforts that come 
with Martin's twenty years of gradually 
spiraling success and leadership in the 
world of broadcast music. 

A fortunate meeting with an ambitious 
astrologer had marked the start of Mar- 
tin Block's radio career. It was another 
man's destiny, however, which sparked 
the beginning of Martin's actual success 
story. 

In 1935, the Hauptmann trial was a 
cause celehre that spawned black head- 
lines on every front page in the world and 
kept radio newscasters busy 'round the 
clock. Journalistically, Martin played no 
part in this drama. He was a mere radio 
announcer — low man on the totem pole 
of a small independent station. 

It was in this situation that Martin 
Block ventured to do one of the most 
inspired (and ultimately profitable) bits 
of ad-libbing in the annals of radio. The 
studio had him "standing by" — had tossed 
him the little problem of keeping listeners 
tuned in between those sporadic news 
flashes. Martin dreamed up an extra 
listening pliLS which did the trick. He as- 
sembled a stack of recorded pop tunes — 
the ones he judged most listenable — and 
played them, one after another. In place 
of the hackneyed "And next we will hear" 
type of introduction, Martin improvised 
a completely new, intimate style of patter 
which created the vivid impression that 
both he and his audience were together 
in some dreamy, elegant ballroom, re- 
plete with crystal chandeliers, endless 
mirrors, and acres of satin-smooth dance 
floor. In addition to these fabulous word- 
pictures, he ad-libbed comments to the 
performing talent — talking to the Dorseys, 
to Whiteman, Goodman and Crosby as if 
those personalities were present in his 
fantasy-ballroom "live," instead of on wax. 

Listener reaction to this new twist? 
Explosive. Calls began jamming the 
switchboard. Where was this exotic place 
of the dance? Whence came these 
rhythms? What magic brought together 
such top-ranking talent under one roof? 

That was Martin Block's cue. His pur- 
pose was not to deceive anyone, but to 
entertain everyone. His brain-child was 
named the "Make Believe Ballroom," a 
program idea which stirred not only 
listener-response but also prompt reaction 
from the sponsors. 

Twenty years have marched past the 
bandstand since Martin's ingenious im- 
agination gave such a good account of 
itself. Today, in his comfortable office at 
ABC, just a few steps west of Central 
Park, he can sit back in the leather-up- 
holstered swivel chair and review those 
two decades with a deep sense of satisfac- 
tion. The experts will verify that his 
"Make Believe Ballroom" has always been 
and still is a glittering showcase for the 
wares of every important bandleader and 
singing personality in the business. 

Among the vocalists who got their 
initial boost toward stardom on Martin's 
tuneful record show are Dinah Shore and 
Frank Sinatra. The cavalcade of band- 
leaders who built bigger followings, thanks 
to Martin, includes Benny Goodman, 
Tommy Dorsey and Harry James. Martin 



himself co-authored (with Mickey Stoner, 
music by Harold Green) his now famous 
opening theme song, "It's Make Believe 
Ballroom Time." And who recorded this 
lilting curtain-raiser? None other than 
the immortal Glenn Miller. 

Those are significant names, legendary 
names, in Martin's book. They conjure up 
a contrast between the radio audience of 
yesteryear and today. 

"There's been a marked change in listen- 
ing habits since the advent of television," 
he observes. "Today, the listener expects 
vocalists to predominate, not groups that 
are strictly instrumental. It's a direct by- 
product of the TV-viewing habit. Nowa- 
days, people sit around in comfortable 
living-room chairs and watch hit tunes 
instead of dancing to them. They've be- 
come conditioned to the visual and, there- 
fore, the vocal, because TV spotlights the 
solo performers. Whenever TV does offer 
a jump tune or a mambo it's apt to be 
a big production number with eye-inter- 
est: sets, costumes, corps de ballet, the 
works. But, most times, the vocalist is 
supreme. It's the singing personality who 
reaches the audience's heart. Listen to 
'Make Believe Ballroom' and judge for 
yourself. It's vocals, ten to one." 

Martin Block, circa 1955, is rated as the 
nation's premier platter-spinner. He has 
toiled in his tuneful vineyard and he has 
garnered great rewards. His material wealth 
is enviable. Reasons enough for review- 
ing two solid decades of success with a 
sense of deep satisfaction. The fact is, 
however, those are not the sole reasons. 
Martin's personal make-up has a definitely 
non-material side ... a side which has 
been somewhat eclipsed by the sheer 
dazzle of his commercial success. 

You are made aware of this less publi- 
cized aspect of Martin Block if you happen 
to meet him in a mood such as was 
prompted by that young mother's fan 
letter — the "three generations of listen- 
ers" letter. It's a mood which comes 
easily to Martin: reflective, self-evaluat- 
ing, critical. If only it were possible to 
wire-tap Martin's thoughts when such a 
mood descends on him, you might over- 
hear — not the question, "Have I been a 
successful disc jockey?" — but rather, 
"Have I been useful to society?" 

Ihe answer to the latter question is 
spelled out in Martin's very respectable 
record of public service activity — entirely 
voluntary activity, by the way. Not a few 
among Martin's fans will recall the times 
when they responded to his xirgent ap- 
peals for blankets, clothing, money — 
anything that would alleviate the hard- 
ship of disaster victims made homeless 
by storms or floods which struck sections 
of the country far outside the boundaries 
of his local listenership. 

There was that time, back in 1943, when 
Martin got "hopping mad." A young GI 
had written to him asking why it was 
that servicemen had to pay for their 
music at certain military camps. The 
youngster complained that, on his post 
and at the port of embarkation, he and 
his buddies could listen to a ballad or 
a bit of jive only if they dropped their 
money in the jukebox. 

"I wasted no time in relaying that 
grievance to my listeners," Martin relates. 
"Their reaction was — well, overwhelming. 
The switchboard was jammed. Letters and 
packages came pouring in — portable radios, 
phonographs, records, and cash. We sup- 
plied military installations on the eastern 
seaboard with enough equipment to fill 
the listening needs of a hundred divisions!" 

On another World War II occasion, 
soldiers suffering from combat wovmds, 
overseas and aboard hospital ships, turned 
to Martin for help. They were ambula- 
tory patients, their letters explained, and 



had a hankering to fill in some of their 
dull hours with music — self-made music. 
Did Martin have any ideas on how they 
might lay hands on a piano? 

"I passed that one along to my listeners 
and the boys got their wish but fast," 
Martin says. "They got first choice from 
the more than three hundred pianos that 
were pledged within hours after I broad- 
cast the appeal." 

Helping people's morale helped 
strengthen the country's war effort. Martin 
knew that war bonds helped, too, and into 
his studio microphone he poured a steady 
stream of his most persuasive salesman- 
ship — on behalf of Uncle Sam. The final 
score? "Make Believe Ballroom" fans 
responded for a total of more than three 
million dollars' worth of bonds. 

These are but a few highlights of Martin 
Block's contributions to pubUc service. 
They're characteristic of his inner need to 
be — not merely a money-maker or a 
maker of hit tunes — but, deep down, a 
useful member of society. 

"To some people, being on the air is 
just another way of making money," he 
says. "You can't just do a program. A disc 
jockey has a terrific responsibihty to the 
community, to the nation — more so, I 
believe, than the editor of a newspaper. 
Oh, siire, he's got a primary obligation to 
present the newest and the best in music, 
and to sell the sponsor's product. He can 
do both, with integrity and honesty, and 
still go beyond that in the service of his 
fellow citizens. Every town, every city 
has its quota of human problems. In most 
cases, there will be a wise leadership 
seeking and carrying out solutions to those 
problems. The good disc jockey, I feel, will 
get behind such leadership — lend support 
to their cause, when asked, or even take 
the initiative." 

iVlake Believe Ballroom" listeners know 
that Martin — on his own initiative — has 
been coming to grips with one much- 
publicized and highly confused problem 
in human relationships: this thing called 
juvenile deUnquency. 

"Like millions of other parents, I've got 
a personal ax to grind in this matter," 
Martin says. "My own son, Martin, Jr., 
is fourteen. Joel Christopher wUl move 
into that teen-age group, soon. Their 
pals are the children of my neighbors 
and friends. And there are fine, whole- 
some youngsters exactly hke them all 
over the country — getting more and more 
on the defensive, almost getting inferiority 
complexes. Like the lad who recently said 
to me: 'Mr. Block, it's reaching the point 
where I can't meet three or four of my 
friends in front of the local drugstore 
without a cop coming over and telling 
lis to break it up, get moving.' " 

As he airs his views on this subject, 
Martin is apt to rise from his chair and 
do a bit of tense pacing. "Sure, it's true 
that some teenagers are making the head- 
lines. But that doesn't justify the wide- 
spread attitude toward all youngsters in 
that age bracket. Too darn many grown- 
ups are getting too darn careless with that 
term 'juvenile delinquent.' It happens to 
be a fact that, out of some forty million 
boys and girls ki this country, only 1.7 
percent can be technically classified as 
juvenile delinquents. One-point-seven 
percent! How about the remaining ninety- 
eight-point-three percent? Isn't it high 
time that people began stressing juvenile 
decency instead of juvenile delinquency?" 

It's all part of the pattern Martin Block 
, started, in those exciting early days of 
disc-jockeying. And, so long as his 
"Make Believe Ballroom" continues to 
pour out music for young and old alike, 
the accent will be on decency, positive 
values, and faith in the future. 



SHEETS, TOASTERS, 
TOWELS, MIXERS, etc. 

GIVEN TO YOU 



TAKE your choice of hundreds of nationally 
advertised products: Cannon Sheets and 
Towels, Dormeyer Mixers, Proctor Toast- 
ers, Bates Bedspreads, Westinghouse Vacuum 
Cleaners — curtains, wearing apparel, silver- 
ware, furniture, watcheS, cameras — yours with- 
out cost! You don't pay a cent for anything. 

Send for FREE Color Catalog 

You can have any of the fine merchandise shown 
in our beautiful, big Catalog: S50.00-S 100.00 
worth — or more — simply by being Secretary of a 
Popular Club you help your friends form. It's 
fun! Thousands are refurnishing and redecorating 
their homes this new, easy way — without spend- 
ing any money. You can, too! 




EUREKA 
VACUUM CIEANER 



ST. MARY'S BLANKETS 



Nothing to Buy — Nothing to Sell! 

Mail the coupon or write for the Free 260-Page Full 
Color Catalog and select the merchandise you want. 
See how easily you can get it without a penny of 
cost. No obligation — write today. 




Popular Club Plan, Dept. G-935, Lynbrook, N. Y. 

Please send me FREE 260-Page Full Color CATALOG of 
nationally advertised merchandise and tell me how I may get 
the things I want without cost. 



Name 

Address 

City Zone State 

Notice to regular Club Secretaries: You will automatically 
receive this new catalog soon. 



r/PS kr EXPECTANT MOTHERS 



FREE booklet of valuable informa- 
tion, "Tips for Expectant Mothers", 
is offered with this soothing, re- 
freshing skin conditioner thai 
softens fight, dry skin, eases muscu- 
lar tingling and burning in^^^ 
back and legs. Enjoy the z^S^l*^ 
Comfort and Relief of I^i's (p^pgj^jjj 
Skin Lubricant. ^v^^^^^^]^ 

$1.25 AT ALL DRUG STORES ^^^ 

Mother's Friend 




Shrinks Hemorrhoids 
New Way Without Surgery 

Science Findfe Healing Substance That 
Relieves Pain— Shrinks Hemorrhoids 

For the first time science has found a 
new healing substance with the astonishing 
ability to shrink hemorrhoids and to relieve 
pain — without surgery. 

In case after case, while gently relieving 
pain, actual reduction (shrinkage) took 
place. 

Most amazing of all — results were so 
thorough that sufferers made astonishing 
statements like "Piles have ceased to be a 
problem!" 

The secret is a new healing substance 
(Bio-Dyne*) — discovery of a world-famous 
research institute. 

This substance is now available in sup- 
pository or ointment form, under the name 
Preparation H.* Ask for it at all drug count- 
ers—money back guarantee. *Keg. V. S. Pst. Off. 




Play Right Away! 

Now it's EASY to leam ANY INSTRUMENT— even if 
you don't know a single note now. No boring exercises. 
You play delightful pieces RIGHT AWAY— from very first 
lesson! Properly— by note. Simple as A-B-C. You maKe 
amazing progress — at home, in spare time, 
without teacher. Only few cents per lesson. --a^S** 

900.000 STUDENTS! .,. . ^gSSt'tT^ 

^^■rp D/>#^l# Shows how easy it ^^Xi^'l^A 
FRtE. BCIUIV to leam music this mod-l.;ffini«»»?'V'; 
em way. Write for it. No obligation; no I 
salesman will call upon you. U. S. Sciiool 
of Music, Studio A-208, Port Washington, 
N. Y. (S7th successful year). 




Amazing Hew, Exclusive 

PARCHMEHT 
CHRISTMAS CARDS 



254 



CASH FOR YOU! 

You've never seen cards so lovely ! 
New Parchment Cards personalized 
with Name-ln-Red, sell fast at 25 
for $1. Just show our exclusive Sam- 
ple Book to friends; take big orders! 
$6S IS YOURS for selling 65 boxes 
of luxurious "Southern Hospitality" 
Greetings. Abo Southern Beauty and other 
Assortments, Gifts, many more. All orders 
shipped in 24 hours. Profits to 100%, plus bonus. 
Get FREE Sample Book. Assortments on ap- 
proval. Slipperettes FREE if you act fast. 
MAIL COUPON NOW! 

I SOuThERN GREETINGS, Dept. B-31 
I 47SN. Hollywood, Memphis 12, Tenn. 



I ±\UTTUt 

I Address 

I City & State.. 




83 



WOMEN 



IF YOU HEED 



m^ 




HERE'S 

150' 

FOR YOU! 




Make all the ex- 
tra money you 
want in spare 
time. Take or- 
ders for beautir 
ful Fashion Frocks — low as 
$3.98 each. Over 100 dif- 
ferent styles, colors, fab- 
rics. We furnish fabric 
samples.You risk noth- 
ing. Absolutely no 
experience needed. 
\ Try it — mail cou- 
\ pon below. 




FASHION 
FROCKS 

''-) INCORPORATED 

Oept. 7-2053 

Cincinnati IS, 0. 

In Canada, North Americon 

Foshion Froclts, Ltd. 

2163 Parthenois, Dept. T-20S3 

Montreal, P. Q. 



PASTE COUPON ON POSTCARD-Mail Today! 



FASHION FROCKS, INC. 

Dept. T>2053, Cincinnati 25, Ohio 

Send me labric samples and everything I need to moke 
money in spare time. No obligalion-everything furnished. 



Name_ 



-Age- 



Address. 



-State- 



City & Zone 

If you live in Canada, mail this coupon to North Ameri. 
1 can Fashion Frocks. Ltd., 2163 Parthenais, Montreal, P.Q. 



(SCALY SKIN TROUBLE) 




^DeRmoiL 



SEE FOR YOURSELF 
no matter how long you 
have aufferefl. Write for 
, FREE book on Psoriasis 
, and DERMOIL with 
, actual "belore — alter" 
I photo record of results. 






84 



vGENEROUS 

TRIAL 

SIXE 



Don't be embarrassed 
with Psoriasis, the ugly, 
scaly skin disease. Try 
non • staining DERMOIL. 

Amazing resulta reported 

for over 22 years! Many 

grateful uaers report the " 

Bcaly red patches on body _^^^^^^ 

or pcalp gradually disappeared and they^^^^^^^^ ■-"■i.At. 

again enjoyed the thrill of a smooth clear skin. DERMOIL 

formula Ih u."ed by many doctors. Must give definite 

benefit or your money baclt. Maiie our famous "One Spot 

Test"! vSI'JND lOp for trial bottle. DERMOIL sold at 

Liggett and Walgreen and other leading Drug Stores. 

Write today LAKE LABORATORIES Dept. 1004 

"" ---- -. station, Detroit 27, Mich, 



Box 3925 Strathr 



A Very Lucky Lady 



(Continuei, from page 54) 
chores. Week nights, she usually has a 
script to learn for the next day's program, 
Ben cueing her when he has time; When- 
ever they can find a really free evening, 
they sandwich in theater or opera in New 
York, but this necessarily involves plan- 
ning ahead, in a household where every- 
body is so busy and there are commuting 
schedules to be consulted. 

In their own neighborhood, everybody 
takes Flo's job for granted, but once in 
a while someone will tell her that Ben has 
been bragging about his wife's talent — 
"although, husband-like, he never toots 
my horn much when I'm aroiind!" 

Flo was a stage actress, sharing an 
apartment with another young career girl, 
when she met Ben. Her roommate often 
mentioned an old beau, a Yale man who 
was "a marvelous musician," and one day 
she came home with Ben in tow. Flora 
recalls: "I thought. How nice! She's seeing 
him again. But she went off to Florida, 
saying I should go dancing with Ben in 
her absence. We both love to dance, so 
that wasn't difficult to take. Before we 
knew it, we were going together and en- 
joying each other's company more than 
anyone else's, although we didn't marry 
imtil about three years later. My former 
apartment mate, still one of my best 
friends, met someone she fell deeply in 
love with and is now a wife and mother. 

"It was understood, when Ben and I got 
married, that I had a career I wanted to 
continue. But I knew then that, if it ever 
interfered with my home life, I would 
drop it quickly. It never has. Fortunately, 
although I have taken time out to have 
two children, we have had no severe ill- 
nesses or other major crises, and neither 
Ben nor I have ever felt my working was 
harmful to our family life. Like other 
mothers who are away from home part- 
time, I make a special effort to be with 
the children during every free hour. I am 
back at the house by three each afternoon, 
when Creel gets up from her nap, and am 
home weekends. What's more, I am com- 
pletely contented to stay at home evenings 
— to be with the children and to study 
my script after they are in bed. I feel I 
am eating my cake and having it, too- 
trite as this may sound — by combining 
such a satisfying family life with an artis- 
tic career." 

For Flora Campbell, the dream began 
when she was a little girl, growing up in 
Oklahoma. She was born in the little 
town of Nowata, which her great-uncle 
helped to found. When she was ten, her 
family moved to Bartlesville, where she 
finished high school, later going on to 
Oklahoma City. 

At seventeen, she persuaded her father 
to let her go to Chicago for a year, to 
study the violin at the famous Chicago 
Musical College. She went home again in 
the summer and, even though her mother 
was ill and in a hospital, she insisted that 
Flora continue her musical education and 
take a regular college course, in addition. 
So, the next year, Flora began to divide 
her time between academic studies at the 
University of Chicago and her musical 
studies. Until something happened to 
change her course. 

"I had come to two conclusions, that 
first year when I was in Chicago alone," 
she says. "One was that I missed my twin 
sister, Dorothy." (There is another sister, 
Beth, three years older, and a younger 
brother, Jack.) "The other conclusion was 
that there were many student violinists 
at the College who were much more tal- 
ented and much more promising than I. 



"My twin wasn't musical, but she had 
been the one to go in for high school 
dramatics and she was keen on going 
ahead with a career. Mother sympathized 
with our ambitions and wanted us to be 
together, so the folks sent us both back 
to Chicago, that second year. We shared 
an apartment with another aspiring ac- 
tress, and gradually I began to think that 
theirs was the more interesting life. I 
listened when they studied their roles at 
home, and I suppose it was inevitable that 
I should decide to become an actress, too. 
So I enrolled in the Goodman School, of 
the Theater." 

After a couple of months, however, dis- 
content set in. Flo found that the one 
leading role she got would be the last for 
the year, each first-year student having 
a chance at just one during the season. 
When she confided her dissatisfaction to 
a friend — her hurry to get ahead and be 
a Broadway star — the friend had just the 
right solution. She herself had been in a 
Broadway show and had loved it and 
filled Flo's head with stories of New York 
and the theater, and now she produced 
a clipping from a New York newspaper 
to the effect that Eva LeGallienne was 
holding auditions for a student group 
which would form a part of her Civic 
Repertory Theater. Out of fifteen hun- 
dred. Flora became one of the fifty to be 
chosen. "Only because no experience was 
required, only some promise," she says. 

It was here she learned the fundamen- 
tals of acting, and such essential things 
as make-up and stage deportment. She 
had speech lessons and lessons in dancing. 
She played "walk-ons" and tiny parts, 
and she learned much about the traditions 
of the theater, the hard work demanded 
of any successful actress, the humility 
with which each small success must be 
accepted. Miss LeGallienne and her ex- 
cellent repertory company inspired Flora 
with a deep love of the theater: "It was 
the greatest good luck for me. Stimulat- 
ing. Wonderful. The ideal first year for 
any young actress." 

Before the LeGallienne season started, 
Flo and Dorothy determined they would 
get some work in summer theater, so they 
made the rounds together. One of the 
places they aimed for was the Cape Play- 
house, at Dennis on Cape Cod, but at first 
they were told that only experienced 
people could be used. They had to admit 
they had no real experience — marveling 
a little that their talent didn't stick out all 
over them and make such mundane quali- 
fications unnecessary! 

As they were leaving the casting office, 
the manager seemed to relent and sug- 
gested he would make an exception and 
let them come as "paying apprentices." 
A little haughtily, they said they expected 
to be paid, and swept out. But he came 
after them again. "You two seem so fresh 
out of Oklahoma, and yet so sure of your- 
selves, maybe we can use you, anyhow. 
You can come with the company, without 
paying." They grabbed at the chance. 

It was a good summer. Flo worked un- 
usually hard, and did so well that she was 
asked back the next summer, and the next 
and the next, as company ingenue. She 
played with some of the greatest names 
in the theater, Ethel Barrymore, Ruth 
Gordon, and Humphrey Bogart. 

By this time, her twin had married and 
was living in New York. -This helped a 
lot, during the winters when Flo was , 
pounding pavements and jobs were few. 
When she needed a good home-cooked 
meal, she could have one at Dottie's. 

"If you were really ambitious you got 
out and looked for a job, rain or shine. 



and sat in dingy outer offices for hours at 
a time, lunching at drugstore counters on 
hot dogs and coffee." This is the way Flo 
sums up the next few winters, until finally 
she got a walk-on in "The Country Wife|' 
and then her first real role in "Excursion," 
an artistic play which received fine no- 
tices but closed in three months. How- 
ever, it did begin a period of fairly smooth 
sailing for Flo in Broadway plays, such as 
"Many Mansions" and "Angela Is 22." 

About midway in her career as a stage 
actress, she married Ben. And, when 
Tommy came along she took a year off to 
play the role of mother and housewife, 
until he was old enough to be left in 
competent hands. She did a few plays 
after that — "Glamour Preferred," which 
was a flop, "The Land Is Bright," which 
certainly didn't have much of a run, and 
"Foxhole in the Parlor," with Montgomery 
Clift. Her last play was "The Curious 
Savage," after Creel was bom, but by this 
time she had discovered a medium called 
radio and another called television — in 
fact, she had played in one very early 
adaptation of "Jane Eyre" on TV, 'way 
back in 1940, and in one of the first day- 
time dramas on television aroimd the 
year 1948, called The Far Away Hill. 

By now her list of radio and television 
credits is long and distinguished — from 
the "nice women" roles in The Strange 
Romance Of Evelyn Winters (radio) and 
the mother in A Date With Judy (TV) to 
fifteen appearances in Kraft television 
dramas, roles in The Web, Danger, Big 
Town, T-Men, Robert Montgomery Pre- 
sents, and Studio One — and, before Valiant 
Lady, the starring role in a daytime drama 
called The Seeking Heart, in which she 
played Dr. Robin McKay. 

When she was first asked to play the 
"Vahant Lady" herself, she had some mis- 
givings. "She sounded so 'noble' that I 
was afraid she wouldn't be a very inter- 
esting person. I was quite wrong about 
her. Helen Emerson is a warmhearted, 
delightful human being, a woman I admire 
and like. A believable person with a fine 
sense of humor, who makes mistakes as 
all of us do, tries to correct them as all of 
us try, and usually comes out on top. I 
think the world is filled with other women 
— and men, too — who are like Helen, try- 
ing to do the best they can." 

Sharing Helen Emerson's strong feeling 
about family ties. Flora Campbell finds 
her a sympathetic person to play. This 
feeling, fostered by having a family of her 
own, was bred in her during her Oklahoma 
childhood. Although her mother passed 
on some twenty years ago, she has never 
forgotten the brave woman who always 
had such great drive and ambition for her 
children. Flo says of her: "She went out 
to Oklahoma to teach school, and there 
she met my father. All her life she was 
interested in education. She was a Brown- 
ing scholar, a bird lover who lectured on 
the subject in our home state and taught 
others to love them. Even her name was 
beautiful and unusual — Isis Justice Camp- 
bell." 

Now Flo's father has retired to Coffey- 
ville, Kansas, to be close to some of his 
family — Flo's Aimt Rebecca, her Aunt 
Frank (for Frances), her Uncle Al and 
her cousins Bob and Bill Hill — all of whom 
live either in CoffeyviUe or the nearby 
town of La Fontaine. They see Valiant 
Lady on television and tell her it's like 
getting a letter from her. "It keeps us 
close," she says. 

This, again, is "eating her cake and 
having it, too." With Ben and Tommy and 
Creel by her side, with the rest of her 
family looking on as she plays that other 
lovely woman, Helen Emerson, Flora 
Campbell knows she's a lucky lady indeed. 



5e// Hew LIWNGCOlORuvmom and other 

CHRISTMAS CARDS 

1 Make ^50 on 50 boxes 



NO BETTER WAY TO EARN EXTRA MONEY 

Let the surge to Religious Christmas Cards bring 
you biggest spare time earniags. New folders fea- 
turing amazing new Living Color Reproductions of 
inspiring Religious subjects pay you $1 per box. 
Easy to sell 50 boxes — make $50.00 — from FREE 
^Samples. 4 glorious new $1 Religious Assortments; 
"I Believe" Album of 45 Deluxe Personals. 200 
other new money-makers for every purse and person. 

This Big Line Has Everything 

Extra profits come easy from Exclusive $1 Glitter 'n Gold Slim 
Asst., other newest Tall Cards; 7 lines' of Christmas Personals; 
unusual Tree and Door Ornaments; Children's Cards, Books, 
Games; over 50 Gifts & Gadgets, others. No experience needed. 

See For Yourself 

Get details of Catalog Shopping Plan, New Gal- 
lery Portfolio, Factory Surplus Bargains. 4 Assort- 
ments on approval. Color Catalog and Personal- 
ized Samples FREE. Mail coupon now. 



ICa'u^^UII 



SEND 

FOR 

SAMPLES 



EXTRAI 

Factory Surplus Bargains 



I MIDWEST CARD CO 



*rr35« 'l^TSO* 



Dept. 445-C ^ 
1113 Washington Ave., St. Louis 1, Mo. 

Please send me money-making details includ- 
ing Bargain List and samples on approval. 

Name 



CoiPiHm brings FRiE list 



MIDWEST CARD COM PANY 

1113 Washington Ave., Dept. Q^Q St. Louis1,f 



Address- 



City- 



State J 



for\ 



t No classes to attend. Easy spare-time train- 
l ing covers big choice of subjects. Friendly 
I instructors : standard texts. Full credit ' 
previous schooling. Diploma awardec 
Write now for FREE catalog! 

WAYNE SCHOOL Catalog HH-26 
' 2527 Sheffield Ave., Chicago 14, Illinois 



■ ■ I ' ' ' 

WOMEM 
OHVlf 



Ifyou need more money... 

Up to $5 hour demonstrating 
Famous Hollywood Cos- 
metics, your neighborhood. 
Free Samples and details 
'm o>^if»lw;;v. supplied. Write to: 
>- Guara^eed by% HARRY TAUOR, Pres. 
Good Housekeeping ) „ ,?'"'''» gi" -.. 
", jv*/ Holljwood Cosmetics 

I^J^ovriiistowS-^lendale, Calif., DepLTS-85 



Imagine Making Big 
MoneyinYourSpareTime! 

This advertisement brings you an op- 
portunity to make big money in your 
spare time. Rush your name and ad- 
dress to us today and we will send your 
FREE information telling you how you 
can earn $50, $60, $70 regularly, 
merely by helping us take orders for 
magazine subscriptions. No experience 
needed. There is no obligation. Write 
today! 

MACFADDEN PUBLICATIONS 

205 E. 42 St. New York 17. N. Y. 



MATERNITY 
STYLE CATALOG 



SAVE MONEV-Shop by Mail! FREE cata- 
log pictures hundreds of exclusive ma- '?VitV 1R 
ternity fashions. World's Largest. Complete //jfiv^'/ 
Selection, Dresses, Suits, Mix & Match Sep- {4i{i?\/y 
arates. Sportswear, GirdleS; Lingerie; $2.98 
to $22.98. Catalog mailed m plain envelope. 

C RAWFORD'S 

Dept. 35, 8015Wornatl.KansasCityl4,Mo. 



Add COLOR To Your TV! 

New Multichrome television screen filter adds 
color to any set. Attach in seconds. Instantly, 
vivid color takes the place of drab black and 
white. Glare and eyestrain are eliminated. 
Guaranteed. Only $2.98. Send now. Specify 
screen size. 

HOLMES COMPANY 

Box 581 Hollywood 28, Calif. 



■ F ^ ^' ^ ^ W 

I Want to Get Rid of 
L Dark or Discolored Skin, 
Freckles, Skin 




Spots?] 



Famous Mercolized Wax Cream 
7 NIGHT PLAN Lightens, 
Beautifies Skin While You Sleep 

Just follow the amazing Mercolized Wax 
Cream? NIGHT PLAN to a whiter, softer, 
lovelier skin. Smooth rich, luxurious Mer- 
colized Wax Cream on your face or arms 
just before retiring each night for one week. 
You'll begin to see results almost 
at once . . . lightens dark skin, 
blotches, spots, freckles as if by 
magic! This is not a cover ap cos- 
metic; Mercolized Wax Cream 
works UNDER the skin surface. 
Beautiful women have ased this 
time -tested plan for over 40 years — you'll 
love it's fast, sure, longer lasting results! 
Mercolized Wax Cream is sold on 1W)% guar- 
antee or money back. Start using it now! 
MERCOLIZED WAX CREAM 

At All Drug and Cosmetic Counters 



Lightens dark 
skin and ugly 
spots almost 
overnigtit. 



85 




Her Life Is a Song 



86 



Thrilling New Massage Cream 
Contains PC-11. Acts Instantly to 

DRY UP SKIN 
BLEMISHES 

From Both Oily Skin and 
External Causes! 

Have you tried in vain to get rid 
of oily pimples, "liickies," other 
externally caused skin blemishes? 
Well, you never had PC-1 1 be- 
fore! That's POMPEIAN'S name 
^ for Hexachlorophene. Wonder- 
ful discovery of science helps dry up such skin 
blemishes! Acts instantly to clean out dirt, helps 
remove blackheads like magic! Goes on face pink — 
rolls off muddy gray! 

GENEROUS TRIAL TUBE— 10 CENTS! 
Send name, address and 10 cents to POMPEIAN 
CORP., Dept. P-8, Baltimore 24, Md. (Offer good 
only in U.S.) Or get Pompeian Mas- 
sage Cream at any drug store. 




POMPEIAN 

MASSAGE CREAM 




(Continued from page 51) 
harder, crowding in more things. Doing 
the Robert Q. Lewis shows, playing club 
dates and ballroom engagements, doing 
telethons, benefits, anything required of 
me. But it's all fun. The whole thing is 
just — well, just great!" 

There's something else, too. Several 
things, in fact. Things that have made 
Betty very happy. Like having a settled 
home, for the first time in years, and fairly 
settled hours of work. "I could never, un- 
til recently, say to my mother, 'Let's have 
dinner at 6 tonight, if you don't mind, and 
then I have a date.' I could never be sure 
of my schedule. Now I can be. My work 
had kept me on the move, or uncertain 
that I could keep any date I made, or fol- 
low through on any plan. 

"If I met someone I thought I might like, 
I never had much chance to know him 
better. Just when I thought that might 
happen, I would have to leave. How can 
you be sure it's more than the usual 
friendship when you meet a person only 
a few times before you have to go ofE 
somewhere? You have to see that person 
with his friends, and with your friends 
sometimes — ^with his family and with yours 
— and you have to get to know his moods 
and the way he feels about the things that 
are important to you. Now all this is 
changed. I'm finding happiness I didn't 
know existed for me." 

If this sounds as though Rosemary 
Clooney's young sister ever felt under- 
privileged, it isn't so. Not at all. Betty 
still thinks she has had the most wonder- 
ful, the most exciting and adventurous life 
a girl could have. 

"We just always loved to sing," Betty 
says. "My grandfather was Mayor of Mays- 
ville, Kentucky, for several terms, and 
Rosie and I always sang when he made 
his campaign speeches. Her special num- 
ber was 'When Your Hair Has Turned to 
Silver.' She certainly could make it sound 
sad and beautiful, even then. I sang 'Home 
on the Range' — you can tell that Grand- 
father was a Democrat, because that was 
President Roosevelt's favorite song. After 
the meetings, we handed out pamphlets 
about Grandfather's candidacy. I might 
add that we were real little 'hams' then, 
and we loved every minute of it." 

The Clooneys moved to Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and the girls went on singing, for 
clubs such as Rotary, at school entertain- 
ments, at church affairs. Rosie was begin- 
ning to think big thoughts and to carry 
Betty along with her enthusiasm. One 
day, after school, Rosie put a choice up to 
her younger sister. "We have thirty cents 
between us, Betts," she said. "Which would 
you rather do — go downtown to radio Sta- 
tion WLW and ask for an audition, or get 
a soda?" 

Betty was immediately entranced with 
the idea of an audition, but Rosemary was 
beginning to waver. She really wanted 
that soda. So they flipped a coin. Betty 
won, and downtown they went, lugging 
their schoolbooks. 

"When our names were called, we sud- 
denly realized how scared we were. Even 
Rosie, on whom I counted for support. We 
sang one duet. They asked us to do an- 
other. Then the program dij-ector came 
out of the control room and said, if we 
would take some lessons in mike tech- 
nique, he could use us later. 

"We told Mother and she was willing to 
have us try. After two lessons, we got 
impatient and stopped. When we •went 
back to tell the program director we were 
ready, he said we weren't — but he would 
take us, anyhow, and let us learn there." 



Betty and Rosemary sang together after 
that for five years, two of them at the 
station. When Tony Pastor came to Cin- 
cinnati with his band, he heard the girls 
on radio and sent word that he could use 
one of them, but not both. They held out 
for two, or none. He hired them for the 
summer, and they stayed three years. 

There came a time, however, when Betty 
began to grow tired of the life that had 
seemed so thrilling to a fifteen-year-old. 
Now she was eighteen, and Rosie was 
twenty-one. Their uncle, who now trav- 
eled with them most of the time, as their 
chaperon and manager, didn't like the idea 
of a girl of Betty's age having dates with 
men she met casually. It wasn't the same 
as letting her go out with the home-town 
boys whom everybody knew. Betty un- 
derstood his point of view, even while she 
resented it just a little, and she began to 
long for the life of a normal young girl, 
the circle of friends of both sexes, the 
parties, the dates, the fun. 

"By this time, Rosie and I had learned 
so much about show business from Tony 
Pastor, to whom we will always be grate- 
ful. He had taught us that it never pays 
to get too impressed with yourself, in this 
or in any business, and that there just isn't 
any substitute for hard work. But I was 
getting a little tired of it all, and I wanted 
to go home. 

"First I told Rosie, and then the others. 
She understood, and they did, too. She 
stayed out our two-weeks' notice, and I 
got on a train bound for Cincinnati." 

Soon Rosemary had a call from New 
York, about a record contract. She signed 
with Columbia Records and began the ca- , 
reer which zoomed so spectacularly with 
the release of her recording of "Come On- 
A My House." Betty stayed on in Cin- 
cinnati, happy to be home, relaxing for a 
while, until she got a call from a local TV 
station. She hadn't done any television up 
to then, but now she was beginning to sing 
alone and she thought she might just as 
well try a new medium and jump both 
hurdles at once. At first she was on five 
times a week, and finally it grew to six- 
teen. There were club engagements, and 
the usual benefits and personal appear- 
ances, and before long she was buildipg 
a career of her own which promised to 
lead to big things. 

Suddenly, Rosie — who was singing on 
television in New York — became ill. Betty 
was asked to substitute for her. She made 
several appearances — on Songs For Sale, 
on the Robert Q. Lewis shows, and some 
others. "It was the first time I had 
worked in Rosie's place, and at first people 
referred to me as 'Rosemary Clooney's 
sister.' Rosie was afraid I might be hurt 
by this. 'Betts,' she would try to explain 
to me, 'it's only because these people are 
my friends and they don't know you yet.' 
By the time they stopped calling me 
Rosie's sister and remembered I was Betty 
Clooney, no one was prouder of me than 
she was." 

The affection of these two is Well-known 
in show business, and it seemed com- 
pletely fitting that they should record the 
song called "Sisters," for Columbia Rec- 
ords, Rosemary's label. Betty was on the 
West Coast, doing the Bing Crosby show — 
with Gary Crosby, who was subbing for 
his dad — when the call came. 

"We hadn't done a record together for 
five years," Betty recalls. "The only time 
we ever argue is when we work together, 
so naturally we started! Rosie had some 
ideas about harmotny. I had some ideas 
about phrasing. We started to argue over 
them the minute we stepped into the 



studio, a.id we never stopped until we 
walked out of it! We got to the point 
where we were being very formal with 
each other— I called her Rosemary instead 
of Rosie and she began to say Betty Ann 
instead of Betts, just like she used to when 
we were kids and she was annoyed. 

"When we got into the car to ride home 
together, we looked at each other and be- 
gan to laugh. 'Betts,' she said. 'Rosie,' I an- 
swered. And we giggled all the way home. 
It was like old times. Now we have de- 
cided that it's a stimulating way to work, 
each goading the other to do her best. 
Rosie is really the most wonderful sister 
a girl could have, with not a trace of 
jealousy or meanness in her. I think she 
is a fine actress as well as singer, and I 
love seeing her in movies. As far as I'm 
concerned, she has jxist everything." 

Betty herself has a brand-new record- 
ing contract, with RCA Victor X label— a 
new one — for which she has already done 
"Si Si Senor," "Ko Ko Mo," and "Only 
Forever" (that last one a sentimental song 
quite in keeping with her present mood!). 
The youngest Clooney sister — ten-year- 
old Gail Ann — is following her big sis- 
ters' example and starting with children's 
recordings for Columbia. (Their brother, 
now in the Army, has a fine voice but 
doesn't expect to use it professionally, at 
least not as of now.) Gail Ann hved in 
Holljrvvood with Rosemary and her hus- 
band, Jose Ferrer, to keep Rosemary com- 
pany before the arrival of her baby. 

Recently, Betty flew out to Hollywood 
for a quick trip to see Rosie and the gang 
and hear the newest voice in the family — 
baby Miguel's. "I'm so happy for Rosie," 
she said. "I'm happy for every girl who 
marries the man she loves and has a fam- 
ily. That's every girl's dream, isn't it? 

"Yes," she admitted, "there's someone I 
am very fond of." (The glow at this point 
became fairly dazzling!) "We're not ready 
to talk about it yet, but it has happened, 
at last, to me. I have had a chance to see 
him with his friends, and with mine. To 
have him as a guest in my home many 
times. To learn what things he thinks are 
important, and to tell him what things 
are important to me. Just as I always 
dreamed of doing when I was on the road." 

In the meantime, Betty loves the little 
apartment in New York, near the CBS 
studio, where she and her mother keep 
house. ("My mother is really indispensa- 
ble. She takes my telephone calls, keeps 
the house and my whole life running 
smoothly.") Betty loves the dinners at 
home, instead of dining in restaurants and 
hotels all the time. She loves sitting 
around, watching TV, listening to radio. 

She has a small but flourishing horse- 
breeding business now, down in the old 
hometown of Maysville. Her manager- 
uncle helped her decide on it. "You love 
horses," he said, "so it would be something 
you could put your heart into." Betty has, 
and there have been profits so far in both 
money (a modest sum) and enjoyment. 
Right now, under her uncle's management, 
they have three two-year-olds, four brood 
mares, one stallion, and three yearlings. 
"This year we will have three horses run- 
ning — because it seems, this time, that o\ir 
three Uttle ones can be better used as 
racers — but mostly we're a breeding farm," 
Betty explains. 

Elnthusiastic as she is about her "breed- 
ing farm," Betty is still more excited about 
her current singing assignments. She loves 
meeting people and hearing what they like 
about the Robert Q. Lewis shows, why 
they're happier for watching and listening 
to Bob and his talented troupe. "It's won- 
derful to have a small part in all this," she 
breathes. "In fact, everything in my life 
is wonderful right now!" 




America's Famous Fashion Guide/ 





Aldens 604-page 

FALL CATALOG 

Save most! Shop easier af home . . . from greater selections! 
It's FREE ... and only at Aldens! No strings, not a loaner— this big Catalog 
is your personal fashion guide to use and enjoy. See all that's new for a 
lovelier you in over 250 pages of fashion news from New York, Paris and 
Hollywood I N ewest fabrics, colors, sizes so right for you. iVIore than 300 pages 
for family and home, too . . . prices so low you'll be amazed! Send now for 
your FREE Fall Catalog. Quantity limited so hurry. See how you can dress 
better, live better for less . . . how you save more, pay as you use on easiest 
terms ... get money-back satisfaction always when you shop the modern 
catalog way at Aldens! DON'T DELAY— clip and mail coupon today! 



• 148 pages in 
glorious color 

• First in 
fashion 
since 1889 

Chicago 80, Illinois 



PASTE TO POSTCARD. ..MAIL NOW 



ALDENS, Dept. 437, Box 8340A, Chicago 80, 
Please rush my FREE Aldens big Fall Catalog. 



Print NAME 



Print ADDRESS or R.F.D. NO. 



Print POST OFFICE (town) 



STATE 



1^ How to Make Money with 
[ /7^^ Simple Cartoons'' 




ARTOONISTS" EXCHANGE 
Dept. 598 Pleasant Hill, Ohio 



THIS AD IS 
WORTH MONEY! 

Let us show you how to make big money in your 
spare time by helping us take orders for maga- 
zine subscriptions. Write today for FREE money- 
making information. There is no obligation. 

MACFADDEN PUBLICATIONS 

205 E. 42 St.. N. Y. 17. N. Y. 



SELL EXCLUSIVE NB^^ 
"Imperial Gold' 

TALL CHRISTMAS CARDS 



Make 7Sc on Every $1.25 Box— 
$€0.00 Easy On SO Boxes ! 

Only Cardinal makes it ao easy to earn ! Fall 
150%prof5t on "Imperial Gold". Exclusive Gift 
Wraps & Ribbons By-The-Yard, 30-Card $1 
Assortment, Personalized Christmas Cards at 
40 for $1.25 and up, 250 card assortments, 
stationery, gifts — many not available any- 
where else. Also famous Doehla line catalog. 
Extra Cash Bonus; Guarantee assures up to 
15c more profit per box. 1-FREE- y^^ _ 

WlTH-EVERY-3 Sample Offer. Send /-^ Guaranteed 
coupon for Free Trial samples NOW! y Good Hoosekeeping 



m 



Cardinal Craftsmen 

1400 state Av., Dept.29S, Cincinnati 14, Ohio 

Send money-making kit of 5 assortments on 
approval, FREE Personalized Samples, 
other FREE Offers. 



NuTJie ... 
Address . 



City State. 



DANCING SHOES — SUPPLIES 

Toe $5.95, Pads & Ribbons $1.00; Ballet 
S3. 29, Tap Shoes With Toe Taps, To Size 3. 
$4.95, Larger S5.45; Acrobatic SI. 39, Crepe 
Sole $1.95. Send Shoe Size and Foot Outline. 
Leotards $3.85. Sheer or Mesh Opera Hose 
$4.95, Mesh Tights $7.45. Hula Skirts $3.25. 
Send Check or Money Order, No C.O.D.'s Please. 

BATON — DRUM CORPS SUPPLIES 

SKATING SKIRTS— Roller or Ice 

Ck)mplete Catalog- 15c (applied to purchase) 

QUINCON DANCE SUPPUES 

7 FOSTER ST.. Dept. R, QUINCY 69, MASS. 



...Train Af Home For 
A WELL PAID CAREER 



PRACTICAL NURSING 





Help fill the nrsent Deed for Trained Practical , 
Nurses. If you are between 18 and 65, it's easy to I 
train at home in your spare time to take your place in this respect- 
ed calling. Many earn while learning'. High school is not needed. 
Nurse's equipment included. Mail this ad today for FREE Facta . 
Wayne School Of Practical Nursing, 
2525 Sheffield Ave., Desk E-85, Chicago 14, 111. 
Please rush FEIEE FACTS and Sample Lesson Paees. 

NAME 



-Full Address. 






TOWELS 



Without spending a penny 

you can get such famous 

^'merchandise as Mirro Aluminum, 

Bates Bed Spreads, Detecto 

Scales, Hoover Cleaners, Chatham 

Blankets, Waltham Watches and 

hundreds of other things you've 

always wanted. 

Become an American Homes Club 

Secretary . . . it's easy . . . it's fun 

, . there's nothing for you to buy 

. . . nothing for you fo self. 

Write for big color catalog 

AMERICAN HOMES CLUB prAl^ToEPT'lBrBANGbTME." 
Please send FREE COLOR CATALOG at no obligation. 

Name 

Street & No 

City 



.State. 



87 



New! Clearasil Medication 

STARVES 
PIMPLES 

SKIN-COLORED. . . hidesplmpleswhUe if works 




Meet Linda Porter 



Doctors' clinical tests prove this new-type medi- 
cation especially for pimples really works. In 
skin specialists' tests on 202 patients, 9 out ot 
every 10 cases were cleared up or definitely im- 
proved while using CLEARASIL. 
Amazing starving action, clearasil actu- 
ally starves pimples because it helps remove the 
oils that pimples "feed" on. And clearasil s 
antiseptic action stops the growth of bacteria 
that can cause and spread pimples. Skin-colored 
to hide pimples and end embarrassment. Grease- 
less, stainless ... pleasant to leave on day and 
night for uninterrupted medication. 
America's largest-selling specific pimple 

medication . . . because '^'-i^,'^''r t'Jar ANTFFn 
many boys, girls and adults. GUARANTttU 
to work for you as it did in doctors tests or 
money back. Only 59!* and 98(>. At all druggists- 
Get clearasil today. 




Now also available in Canada (slightly more) 



Corns 



Sore Toes, 
Tender 
Spots 




Pain Stops 
FAST 

No waiting! Super- 
Soft Dr. Scholl's Zino-pads stop pain at its 
source ever so fast . . . remove corns one of 
the fastest ways known to medical science . . . 
stop corns before they can develop — ease 
new or tight shoes . . . pre- h^ — -m- 
vent sore toes, blisters. No ^^^ m 
other method does all this! ^^ ' 
For FREE sample, write 1 
Scholl's, Inc., Chicago 10, 



mtfDrSchollsZinopads 



{Continued from page 35) 
Patricia, who is not quite a year and a 
half old) will greet Gloria as the same 
uncomplicated child she left that morn- 
ing — Tish being still too young to be 
touched by television. 

The way things are now in the Louis 
household, in a big apartment not far from 
the NBC -TV studios where Gloria works, 
either or both of the boys may end up as 
producers or directors or even as co- 
actors of hers at some later date — although 
Ashley at the moment is more interested 
in sports and in being a Cub Scout (Gloria 
is a Den Mother) . Ashley is also a studious 
little boy who likes to read and to play 
the piano, but it's he who takes over when 
Gloria practices her narration and some of 
the commercials on a tape recorder at 
home. And he handles it like a pro. 

"Ashley really has to run the recorder," 
she says, "for the simple reason that I 
don't know how. Boy-like, before I could 
even begin to figure it out, he had it all 
mastered. So he is the 'producer' — until 
I'm finished, and J. C. takes over to do 
some impromptu commercials of his own. 
J. C. never offers his mythical audience 
anything less than 'the giant family size' — 
especially when he decides the product 
should be candy bars or cookie mixes." 

To J. C, everything that happens on 
television is very real. Now that he has 
decided to be Superman, he hasn't been 
able to understand why he, too, cannot 
fly. "How would you like to untrain a 
child who believes he can take off from 
any convenient chair or table?" Gloria 
asks. "That's what Jack and I have had 
to do. We let him jump off the kitchen 
table and get a few bruises so he would 
understand that Superman has a few tricks 
up his cape that small boys have yet to 
learn. Now he seems satisfied merely to 
strut in a Superman outfit, and he doesn't 
even mind when the oWer childre-i rib 
him about the cape. He lives his role!" 

Gloria understands this thespian urge in 
her offspring. She always had it herself. 
At seventeen, already a tall attractive 
blonde with lovely gray eyes, she entered 
a singing contest at The Nine O'clock Club 
in New York, a sort of junior Stork Club 
owned by Sherman Billingsley. "The 
children of the people who went to the 
Stork Club used to like to dance at the 
Nine O'Clock and, after I won a three- 
weeks' singing enffapement there, abso- 
lutely nothing could have held me back." 

Through a professional performer at the 
club, she was introduced to an agent and 
got a few minor engagements. Most of 
all, of course, she wanted to sing on the 
Broadway stage. Lew Brown made an 
appointment to audition her for his play, 
"Yokel Boy," took one look at her childish 
face and said, "Go home, little girl, and 
come back to see me when you grow up." 
Cut to the quick by this lack of confidence 
in her woman-of-the-worldliness (she had 
been sure, up to this point, that she looked 
at least eighteen!), she kept the rebuff to 
herself and said not a word to her parents. 
She turned up again next day, however, 
in Mr. Brown's office, as if to assure him 
that if she could take the slings and arrows 
of show business she was certainly old 
enough to be in it. 

"I was too scared to say much, but I 
didn't have to. I guess he knew he had 
met his match. He hired me for the chorus, 
in which I did practically nothing, and so 
did it well enough." 

Originally her name was Gloria Hope 
Trope, but the last name got to be a 
nuisance, because everyone seemed to 
stumble over it and didn't believe it was 



her real name anyway. So she dropped 
the Trope, and was known as Gloria Hope. 
When she auditioned for Dick Rodgers, he 
gave her a chorus job in the Rodgers and 
Hart musical, "Higher and Higher." This 
time she had more to do, and did it better. 
After that, things were easier. She sang 
with Ray Heatherton and his band in the 
Rainbow Room on top of the RCA Build- 
ing, in Radio City. She played the femi- 
nine lead, the wistful Kathy, in "The Stu- 
dent Prince," on Broadway for three 
months and on tour for a year. 

"My mother glued herself to my side all 
this time, picking me up at the theater at 
night, traveling with me when I went on 
tour," she recalls. "Show business was 
new in my family — my sister never had 
theatrical ambitions, is married and has 
three children. My brother was a flier 
who was killed in an Air Force flight in 
the Pacific, after the war was over. So far 
as I know, there was no family precedent 
for my career. But I was determined to be 
a star, and I finally landed in Hollywood 
for a few months, where I made sev- 
eral pictures — 'Anchors Aweigh,' 'Women's 
Army,' and a lead part opposite Preston 
Foster in 'Twice Blessed.' 'Then something 
happened that brought me back to New 
York." 

The "something" that happened was 
falling in love — with a tall, dark and 
rugged-looking young fellow by the name 
of Jack Louis, whom she had met three 
years before on a blind date. She had 
thought at first that he was too serious, 
even a trifle stuffy for such a young man. 
In fact, she wasn't at all sure that she liked 
him, except that he was such a wonderful 
dancer and she did like to dance. So they 
began to date, but it was a geographically 
inconvenient sort of friendship almost from 
the first. She would have to go off, on 
tours or singing engagements. He went 
into the Army. Whenever they were in the 
same city they went dancing, but it wasn't 
too often. Often enough, however, for 
Gloria to discover that Jack had unsus- 
nected qualities she liked very much — 
humor, kindness and sweetness. 

"I think I was glad to go to California 
partly because I wanted to find out if I 
was really in love with Jack — and if ab- 
sence would make me sure of it. You 
might say that I chased him until he 
caught up with me! When he finally did, 
we both knew we were in love and he put 
the decision up to me squarely— to give 
up a movie career and come back to New 
York and marry him, or to forget him. 
Of course I came back — although some- 
times I like to think I gave up a 'big Holly- 
wood career' all for love! It's a nice 
thought, anyhow. We had a real family 
wedding in New York, the kind every girl 
looks forward to. Jack's folks came from 
their home in Little Rock, Arkansas, and 
all my family were present." 

There had been no objection to Gloria's 
going on in the theater, but after Ashley 
was born she wanted to spend as much 
time as she could at home. "To remain 
in the theater meant being away from my 
baby every night and, besides, I didn't 
want Jack to be one of those husbands 
who has to hang around backstage wait- 
ing for his wife. He is a businessman, a 
stockbroker, and when he comes home at 
night he is entitled to find his family wait- 
ing. So I began to think about getting into 
television, which was then getting more 
and more important. I tried out for my 
first TV job, a cooking program. By the 
time J. C. was born, I was determined to 
stay in TV and to forget the stage, all 
my old dreams of stardom deserted. Now 



I 



I had a home and family, as well as a 
career to consider. After a year of trying, 
I got a job on the Hazel Scott show, doing 
the commercials." 

Little by little, her telephone began to 
ring, with job offers. Dramatic shows were 
coming into their own on television, and 
Gloria began to get roles in one after the 
other, stacking up some seventy-five dif- 
ferent parts to date. More and more she 
was called upon to make commercial an- 
nouncements, having the happy faculty of 
talking to her listeners as one housewife 
to another, with complete sincerity, be- 
cause she believed in the products she 
described. Last January, when she was 
asked to do the commercials and be the 
hostess-narrator on Way Of The World — a 
dramatic daytime TV program which tells 
a complete story every week or two and 
introduces a new group of actors playing 
a new cast of characters for each story — it 
seemed like an exciting combination of 
two things she enjoys. 

This summer Ashley and J. C. will go 



of? to camp, and Gloria will take the babj' 
to a little nearby park during the lazy 
summer afternoons. Weekends, they will 
go off with Daddy to a beach club, for 
swimming and relaxing. Weekdays, she 
will be up and out right after an early 
breakfast, leaving Tish with her excellent 
nurse — and, evenings, she will go on study- 
ing her scripts, missing the noise and ex- 
citement the boys create. Then soon it 
will be fall and the big, comfortable apart- 
ment will be lively again. 

Sometimes, Gloria will bring home a 
particularly nice fan letter and let Jack 
and the boys read it— and J. C., in particu- 
lar, will be impressed because she gets 
fan mail, just like Superman. "Why, you're 
famous!" he will probably say to her, just 
as he did the first time he discovered that 
his mother was a television star — although 
certainly not in a class with a fellow by 
the name of Clark Kent! 

Someday he'll learn, as so many others 
have, that Gloria Louis is in a class all by 
herself. 



Always in Harmony 



I 



(Continued from page 31) 
was nine — and took to the trees." 

While Chris could be found on Route 
25, Dot was usually perched on the top 
branch of the tallest tree. She could skin- 
the-cat on a medium-sized cloud. She led 
the neighborhood children up and down 
the trees. 

Actually, both Dot and Chris have a 
^reputation for clamming up. But, if you 
said Chris were pianissimo, then you 
might call Dot double pianissimo. The 
sister who likes to talk is Phyl. She sizzles 
like bacon in a hot skillet. She's the one 
who always answers the phone. Meets 
with song-pluggers. Makes or breaks 
dates. Keeps in contact with agents and 
pubUcists and publishers. She is vivacious, 
lovely and cheerful, but also conscientious 
and a worrier. Phyl always insists on 
listening to tapes of their broadcasts and 
gets worked-up about the smallest error. 
1^^ "Phyl's early years were noted for her 
!^B romances," says Dot. "She had as many as 
three fiances at a time. She started right 
after she got out of the playpen." At the 

• age of six, Phyl proposed to a playmate 
and was accepted. Instantly, they headed 
for Kentucky, where they could be mar- 
ried with twenty-four-hour residence. 
They were thirteen blocks closer to the 
j^L state line when friends of Phyl's parents 
I^P came by and asked her where she was 
going. She spilled the beans, and the 
adults took her home. 

With three such extraordinary gals, one 
would expect extraordinary parents, and 
so it was and is. Asa McGuire, a steel 
worker, is a mixture of Cherokee and, of 
course, Irish. He is a six-footer, very 
handsome, with coal-black hair and eyes. 
Lily McGuire, of German extraction, 
stands just an inch shorter than her 
daughters, and she is an ordained minister. 
She founded the First Church of God in 
Miamisburg, Ohio, and served as pastor 
until her retirement last year. 

The girls called themselves "PKs" — 
preacher's kids — and, as such, found they 
were expected to be constantly on good 
behavior, take on more responsibilities in 
church w^ork, and lead a more restricted 
social Ufe. On weekdays, they had to be in 
at ten-thirty and, on weekends, it was 
eleven. There was no card playing, and 
when the girls got a Monopoly game — 
they thought they were really hving it up. 

"Although our folks were very strict," 
says Dot, "they were understanding and 
had a good sense of humor. We always had 
a lot of fun with them. And Mother was 
like a sister to us. When we broke a rule 



or did something wrong, she would just 
sit down and talk about it. There were 
no penalties or punishments." 

Chi-is studied piano for nine years. Phyl 
studied voice. Dot learned to play piano — 
and even tenor sax, so she could march 
in the school band. For many years, the 
girls sang for their own pleasure and then 
began to sing at church or, by request, at 
funerals and weddings. Actually, they 
never sang a pop tune in public until 1950 
— but, in the four years preceding, they 
got their most intense training. About 
1946, other preachers heard them sing and 
the trio was in constant demand all over 
the country, at evangelical meetings. 

The first hint of what was in the future 
for them occurred on a Sunday morning 
in Dayton, after they had sung in church. 
The services had been broadcast and Karl 
Taylor, a top Midwestern booking agent, 
heard the trio and rushed down to the 
church: "Do you sing popular music?" 

"Never touch it," the girls said. 

"Well, if you ever change your minds, 
please come to see me." 

It wouldn't have been proper to sing 
pop tunes one night and hymns the next. 
Aside from this, the girls had several dis- 
tinct reservations about show business, 
fearing it was a sinful way of life. That's 
probably why the trio started in show 
business under the most sterile conditions 
possible — through a hospital door. 

It happened this way. In 1950, a friend 
sent a home recording of the trio to the 
late Richard Maxwell, who at the time 
was scouting the country for talent to 
entertain at veterans' hospitals. Mr. Max- 
well gave one listen, phoned the girls 
and made a date to meet them in Dayton. 
There he persuaded them it would be 
proper to sing ballads for veterans. 

"We were to sing a couple of pop songs 
and then go into our repertoire of hymns," 
Phyllis reminisces. "Trouble was that 
the boys asked for more and more pop 
tunes, and you don't refuse the requests of 
bedridden men." 

They got to meet other people in show 
business and came to the conclusion that 
it wasn't so sinful, after all. After nine 
months of touring, they returned to Ohio, 
looked up Karl 'Taylor and said, "Book 
us." That was in 1951 and, within a 
year, they were to be celebrities. 

At first they sang club dates and then 
with Karl Taylor's orchestra. One day 
they went up to the WLW-TV studios to 
audition for the program manager, Neal 
Van Els. The girls got a program of their 
own, and Phyllis got herself a husband — 



'^ CtJIing AH Women? 



' SHOW FRIENDS 

NEW TALL STYLE 

Christmas & All Occasion 

GREETING CARD-^ 

ASSORTMENTS ( 

, folks are wild about ^^ 






Hew 1955 „,* 19SS 

GOlO EMBOSSED jaU il-CARO 

« * ■ I r &RD ^ ■■ H M te Christmas Ass t. 

T^^} .ass"** ■•^^ with90ld-l.n«> 




Make 

*50-$75 

-»100 



EXTRA 
MONEY 




New 1955 

Christmas 

Matching 

GIFT 

WRAP 

M EnsembI* 




■itFEll^l, 

"ACTION" 

COMIC 

Christmas 
Ass't. 



Pni^l^ 77 Name imprinted , 
rllEE SAMPLES of 

i Christmas Cards, Stationery, Notes, Napkins 




179 New Ways 

To Make Money 

for yourself, club or church! 
Take easy orders spare time 
for amazing value Christmas, 
year 'round box assortments, 
exquisite novelties, personal 
gold stamped items. FREE 
Personal Christmas Card al- 
bum. No experience needed. 



Start A Greeting Card and 
Gift Shop At Home 



MAKE FRIENDLY SOCIAL CALLS. Profits to 100% 
plus cash bonus. New Party Plan increases m- 
come. Have money for new clothes, furmshmgs. 



FUND RAISING PLAN — PREMIUM OFFERS 
Make up to $1.00 per box! 



ONE MONEY MAKER SAYS: "I have been 
selling your cards for almost two years and I 
have made enough money to buy a lot of things 
I have wanted." — Diane Carey of Illinois 



Let us send you fqr FREE TRIAL 
EVERYTHING YOU NEED to get started 



WRITE TODAY 

for actual boxes on 
approval and FREE 
48-page full color 
illustrated catalog. 
If outfit does not 
make money for you 
in a jiffy, return it 
at our expense. 

New England Art Publishers 
North Abington. 821. Mass. 
iHHMiSer.d No Money — Moil Coupon Now h ■§ 

NEW ENGLAND ART PUBLISHERS 

North Abington, 821. Mass. 
Please send me at once Feature 
assortments on approval, free sam- 
ples Persona] Christmas Cards. 
Stationeri', Notes. Napkins, free 
Catalo?:. SellinfT Guide. Premium 
Offers and details of your wonder- 
ful extra mone\- plan. 





Name. 



D 



Check here if writing for club or church 
organization interested in raising^ funds. 

■ ■'No Risk On Your Part"""" 




89 



MAGNEYIC 
POT HOLDERS 



90 




Place these 
quilted 

magnetic pot 
holders flat 

against any metal surface 
(stove, refrigerator, metal 
cabinets, etc.). Presto! They 
"stay put"— ready and handy 
to use . . . flip them back 
against the metal-and they 
stay in place... as decorative 
as they are useful . . . tiny 
magnets are invisible and will 
last forever . . . washable and 
rust proof ... no modern 
kitchen should be without 
them... makes a stunning gift 
. . . Order yours NOW! We pay 
postage! Use coupon. 



"TWIN 
KITTENS" 



only 

$125 

I a pair 



World Wide 

63 Central Ave., Ossining, N. Y. 

/ enclose $. . . .for. . ."Twin Kifiens" 

Pot Holders. 

Name 

Street 

City Zone. . . .State 

Send cash or money order. 



of simple care in minor injuries 

em-sff/ws 

May avoid terrible infection 



I 



Apply germ-arresting 
OIL-0-SOL at once. 
Helps control infec- 
tion, ease pain, speed 
healing. At your drug 
store- MOSSO'S 

OIL*0*SOL 



MAKE $S0-$60 A WEEK 

You can learn practical nursing at home 
in spare time. Course endorsed by phy- 
sicians. Thousands of graduates. 56th 
yr. One graduate has charge of 10-bed 
hospital. Another saved $400 while 
learning. Equipment included. Men, 
women 18 to 60. High school not 
required. Easy tuition payments. Trial plan. Write today. 
CHICAGO SCHOOL OF NURSING 
Dept. 28. 25 East Jackson Blvd., Chicago 4, III. 
Please «end free booklet and 16 sample lesson pages. 

A'ome 

City State Age 

YOU'D NEVER KNOW I HAD 




ti-H.lrlM-HH 



(S. D.)". ». 





As hundreds of thousands of users 
have learned, Siroil tends to re- 
move psoriasis crusts and scales 
on outer layer of skin. Light 
applications help control recurring 
lesions. Siroil doesn't stain cloth- 
ng or bed linens. Oflfered on 
two - weeks - satisfaction • or - 
i 1\ money-refunded basis. 22 
'"Mi^^k years of successful results. 
Write for free booklet. 



'?Hu t^OH/^ t<y- 



SIROiL 



AT ALL DRUG STORES 

Siroil laborotories inc., Dept. M-76, Santa Monica, Colli. 



Neal Van Els. "We knew Neal was the real 
thing," Dot says. "She gave up all her 
other fiances before she even proposed." 
Their TV show was aired for thirty-nine 
weeks, and the girls put in twenty-two 
weeks in the supper club at the Van 
Cleave Hotel. And then it started: Fans 
and guests at the hotel asked why they 
didn't go to New York and audition for 
some of the major television shows, par- 
ticularly Arthur Godfrey's Talent Scouts. 
"We had never thought that way," Chris 
says. "We were earning our living doing 
something we enjoyed. That was all that 
it meant." 

One night, during an intermission, the 
girls took a walk around the block. Sud- 
denly, Dot said, "Let's go to New York." 
"I'm for it," Chris said. 
Phyllis had to be convinced, and they 
convinced her. But first they made an 
agreement: If they failed, they would dis- 
band as a trio. That would be the end. 
They didn't flop. They hardly had a 
chance to flounder. Almost immediately, 
they got a job with Kate Smith for eight 
weeks. They were a smashing success on 
the Talent Scouts show in December of 
1951. After a week, before they left for 
Ohio, Arthur said he'd be phoning them. 
In January, the call came and, before 
the end of the month, the McGuire trio was 
adopted into the family of Little Godfreys. 
But the girls were real hayseeds when 
they first got to New York. So much so, 
it almost lost Chris her future husband. 
"We were at the Astor Hotel one after- 
noon, trying to get tickets to a musical, 
and the broker was sold out. A man stand- 
ing by politely introduced himself, handed 
us his card and said if we came up to his 
office he could get us tickets." 

The man was John Teeter. He is Execu- 
tive Director of the Damon Runyon Can- 
cer Fund and his office was in the hotel. 
At the time he had tickets, for a benefit 
performance of "South Pacific," but the 
girls figured him for a sharpie. (It should 
be noted that he neither looks nor acts 
like a sharpie. He is slim and dresses 
conservatively and is intelligent and quite 
business-like.) Finally, the girls figured 
that, if they went up to his office three- 
strong, they could just about hold their 
own in a pinch. But he didn't pinch and, 
in fact, was so gracious that he invited 
all three to be his guests at the theater. 
"He took us all out once or twice a 
week," Phyl recalls. "He would ask where 
we wanted to go, and we would mention 
a place we'd read about. We had no idea 
then how expensive it all was. He was 
so nice, but I think we about bankrupted 
him!" 

The triple-dating went on for months 
until one evening when John Teeter 
called. Phyl answered the phone, as usual, 
but he asked for Chris. While Chris got 
on the phone, Phyl turned to Dot and said, 
"I wonder where he is taking us tonight?" 
And Dot said, "What shall we wear?" 
Then Chris got off the phone, and Phyl 
asked, "Well, where are we going?" 
"He invited only me." 
"But we always go," Phyl said. But they 
didn't. Not again. 

About a year later, John and Chris mar- 
ried. In December of 1952. October of 
that same year, Neal came down from Ohio 
and m.arried Phyl. Dot's wedding was in 
July of 1951. She had married a school 
sweetheart, Johnny Brown, who was and 
is in the Army. 

Dot and Johnny and Phyl and Neal and 
Tinker, a toy poodle, share the same duplex 
apartment in the East Fifties. Upstairs, 
they have three bedrooms and three baths. 
Downstairs, instead of dining and living 
rooms, they have two "living rooms" with 
a television receiver in each, so that there 
is never any conflict about program choice. 



"We brought our furniture in from an- 
other apartment," Dot says, "and we don't 
take it seriously." Most of it is simple mod- 
ern, with an old grand piano thrown in. 
The living room has a high ceiling and 
fair enough acoustics, so the girls can 
practice here, most evenings. 

Chris and John Teeter live about ten 
blocks north of her sisters. She has two 
sons by a previous marriage. Harold, 
twelve, is in a private school in Massa- 
chusetts. Asa, eight and bright as a new 
penny, lives with Chris and John. 

Chris — a fashion expert who buys all of 
the trio's clothes, including undies — has 
furnished her apartment predominantly in 
black and gray, the same colors she favors 
in dress. The furnishings are modern. 
A raised bamboo blind displays a dra- 
matic view of Manhattan's skyscrapers. 

You might say Chris is the "detonator" 
for each day's work. At seven A. M., she 
phones Dot to discuss what they will wear. 
Dot passes orders for the day on to Phyllis. 

They meet for rehearsal at eight-thirty, 
dressed alike, with bright-red lipstick and 
red fingernail polish. They are extreme- 
ly careful about jewelry. What might be 
in good taste for one can look too flashy 
when they all stand together. 

After the morning show, they begin re- 
hearsal for the next morning. Monday 
and Tuesday and Wednesday, they work a 
full day until the big-hour variety show 
goes off. And every night, except week- 
ends, they meet to practice for an addi- 
tional hour and a half. 

They get along well. They are so com- 
fortable together that they usually double- 
date — or triple-date — and vacation to- 
gether on weekends. They don't have 
frequent free weekends, for they are in 
great demand to make personal appear- 
ances. And, at most of the clubs they 
have played, they have broken all records. 
A recent royalty check for phonograph- 
record sales was $50,000. 

They don't live lavishly. Each gets forty 
dollars a week for cabs, hairdresser, 
lunches, tips, and incidental expenses. Ten 
percent of their total income goes to the 
church back in Ohio. They finished off the 
mortgage on the family home, then pre- 
sented their parents with a spanking-new 
Buick. The girls spend little money on 
themselves, because there's little sense 
buying what you won't have time to use. 

But the price of success is much more 
serious than giving up luxuries. What 
hurts is that there is too little time for 
husbands, and no time to make a home. 
"It's not the kind of life you want to live 
forever," Dot says. "A home should be 
more than a place where you sleep and 
keep your clothes." 

It's odd to hear of girls so young and so 
successful already thinking of retirement, 
but they value home life. They've never 
cut their own roots. Holidays are always 
spent with parents. If they can't get back 
to Ohio, their parents fly into New York. 
Anyway, it's not surprising to learn that 
the secret desire of each is to have a home 
of her own. 

"A nice house," says Chris. "I think we've 
earned it." 

"I don't know when we'll quit," Dot 
says. "We'll just have the feeling, and that 
will be the end." 

"If anyone decides she's had enough, 
that's the end," Chris says. "There will 
be no argument about it. We'll just quit." 

The McGuires aren't quitting today or 
tomorrow. They enjoy singing and, like 
anyone else, they enjoy success. But they 
don't need it. There is a core of pride 
and dignity in each that transcends any 
job or duty they've had or will ever 
have. These gals are something special, 
who should inspire, as well as sing, songs. 



No Time for Love 



{Continued from page 57) 
offices he had been bombarded constantly 
with the same tune. He tracked it down 
and found an executive working away — 
with the "Frenesi" record playing softly 
on a small phonograph at his elbow. 

"What's this?" Steve asked, with the 
natiiral curiosity of a true showman. "You 
repeat this record all day long. What 
makes?" 

"Nothing," the man said. "I just like it." 

The arm of the player swung again into 
position, and the record played. 

"Eydie Gorme?" asked Allen. 

"The same," said the man. 

"I caught her on a TV guest appearance 
the other night," Steve said. "Hmm . . ." 

It was three days later that Eydie 
Gorme — in person — walked through the 
same office and happened to meet Jules 
Green, Steve Allen's manager. Now, it is 
Mr. Green's well-known habit to speak in 
quietly intimate tones, with a this-is-just- 
between - you - and - me quality — whether 
he's asking the latest baseball score or in- 
viting a lady to tea. 

However, at this point Eydie had never 
met Jules, nor did she know him from 
Adam. When he stepped up to her, intro- 
duced himself, cind asked, "How would 
you like to be on a TV show?" — well, as 
Eydie remembers it now, "It was as 
though he were asking me if I'd like to 
buy a hot diamond I" 

So, sidhng away, she laughed nervously 
and said she was sorry, thanks a lot, she 
was afraid she just wouldn't have time. 

She didn't realize that she had very 
nearly said goodbye to the biggest oppor- 
timity of her life — until a day or two later, 
when Ken Greengrass, her manager, 
phoned her and asked, in a sorrowful 
voice, if she'd gone completely out of her 
mind. "You are offered a spot on the new 
Steve Allen show — network — and you tell 
his manager you are too busy!" said Ken. 

While she was recovering from shock, 
he added, "Believe me, you are not too 
busy for a spot like this. We're- signing to- 
night. . . ." 

Now, at last, she had the job she'd been 
waiting and praying for, and she threw 
herself into it with every bit of talent and 
energy and heart she possessed. But, 
somehow, after the first few days, she 
knew it wasn't working. 

With typical honesty, Eydie set out to 
discover why she wasn't making the grade. 
She had a film of one of the shows run for 
her, and watched it, pretending she'd nev- 
er seen or heard of Eydie Gorme before. It 
didn't take five minutes for her to find the 
answer. She was too fat. Some ten or fif- 
teen pounds too fat. Where she had mere- 
ly looked voluptuous to a live crowd in a 
night-club show, the TV camera merci- 
lessly showed her as a "dumpling." 

Still, she faced it. There was no good 
trying to tell Steve or anybody else what 
she was going to do. She must go ahead 
and do it. At first, she starved herself. 
That didn't help matters, and it did make 
her nervous and miserable. Then she tried 
eating only certain dietary foods, and the 
result was that she could think of nothing 
hut food. 

Finally, she hit on the idea of ordering 
the things she Uked, but eating only a 
small portion of each — half a sUce of toast 
at breakfast, instead of three slices, and 
so on. And that worked. One day, Steve 
and the others on the show looked at her 
in a special way, when she turned up in a 
new dress she couldn't even have worn 
three weeks before. They comphmented 
her delightedly — then canceled the audi- 
tions for a replacement. She had won 
against time, and she'd done it all herself. 



Watching Eydie working on the Allen 
show in Florida, during that crazy week 
when Steve took the whole outfit down 
there, no one could help but admire the 
seemingly easy manner, the poise, with 
which she had fitted herself into the very 
casual format. After all, Allen was all over 
the place and so was everyone else in the 
cast. Furthermore — so far as an innocent 
bystander could see — nobody had done a 
smidgen of preparation for what was to 
be a very involved network broadcast. 

Appearances were deceiving, of course. A 
lot of people had been working like bea- 
vers behind the scenes, even when they 
seemed intent only on getting a sun tan. 
Suddenly, it was late evening, and the 
show went on the cameras, and there was 
Steve way up at a top-floor window of the 
hotel, bathed in a spotlight, yelling and 
shooting guns. A few minutes later, he was 
introducing a porpoise in the pool. And, 
seconds after that, he was suggesting that 
we all listen to Miss Gorme sing a song. 

She came out smiling, completely at 
ease, and sang like an angel. "Man!" a re- 
porter whispered fervontly. "That's show- 
manship!" 

As to the problems of working on an 
unrehearsed program like Tonight, she 
says: "I'm getting used to it now. But, for 
the first few weeks, I was in such a state 
by curtain time that my neck was all 
swelled up, I was popping allergy pills 
into my mouth every five minutes, and I 
didn't have an octave left in range." 

However, it had been up to her to sink 
or swim with the new impromptu method 
of producing such shows. There was, for 
instance, the afternoon when she was 
handed a brand-new song, in sheet music 
form, and told that she was to sing it on 
the show that night. 

It was not, as she'd momentarily hoped, 
a simple ballad. It was an extremely com- 
plicated arrangement. She spent an hour 
mastering it, then, with the sheets of mu- 
sic in her hand, went out on the studio 
stage to find Skitch Henderson alone at the 
piano, frowning and picking out notes 
with a forefinger. 

He brightened when he saw Eydie. 
"There you are!" he said. 

"Yes," said Eydie. "Skitch, how am I 
going to sing this tonight? It needs so 
much rehearsal, and I — " 

"Now, don't worry about a thing," 
Skitch said, in his special way, holding his 
hands in front of him and waggling them 
soothingly. "Just don't worry about it. I'm 
going to do a new arrangement." 

"What!" cried Eydie. "I've just learned 
this one!" 

"Don't worry for a minute," Skitch said 
again. "It's all going to be all right." As 
she turned to go, Skitch reached out and 
took the sheet music from her hand. "I'll 
need this. It's the only copy of the song." 

"No!" Eydie yelped, making a wild lunge 
for the music. 5kitch held it behind his 
back, fending her off, saying: "Now, don't 
worry, don't worry . . ." 

"And do you know," Eydie recalls, "we 
went on the air jiist three hours later — 
and that song was one of the biggest 
smashes we've ever had!" 

Eydie has had to learn not only to take 
such problems in stride, but how to take a 
casual, good-natured part in almost any 
procedure or act which demands her pres- 
ence — singing, dancing, reading lines in 
sketches. In other words, she has had to 
become a versatile, accomplished star. 

She was born in The Bronx, of Turkish 
parentage, and grew up the way any aver- 
age young American girl does. Her older 
brother and sister turned out to be less 
than talented at either piano or violin, so 



DO YOO MBD 

MOHEY? 

«35.00 

IS YOURS 

for selling only 50 boxes of our 

300 Christmas card line. And 

this can be done in a single day. 

Free samples. Other leading 

boxes on approval. 

Mail coupon below today. 



It costs you nothing to try. 



Last year some folks made $250« 
$500-$1,000 and more this very way. 
Church groups and organizations can 
do this, too. No experience necessary. 




FEATURE DELUXE 

21 stunning assorted 

Christmas cards of 

every type, color 

and taste 



Latest rage! Distinction, 

smart new, slim styling 

— beautiful! 




mmmmim aw 



CHRISTMAS 

GIFT WRAP ENSEMBLE 

20 large deluxe sheets 

all 20" X 30" — gay Christmas 

colors with rnatching 

seals and tags 



■riiffiii'iiiminy' 



of p<Tp-ou1 
designs in 
slim style 



BOX 

assortment 
, clever 




FREE 
SAMPLES 

PERSONALIZED 
CHRISTMAS CARDS 
and STATIONERY 




BIBLE TEXT 

CHRISTMAS ASSORTMENT 

21 inspiring religious cards 

with Bible verses 



An assortment of 
radiant beauty in 
the fashionable, 
new slim design 



CHEERFUL CARD COMPANY, Dept. 188, White Plains, N. Y. 

■ ■■ Mail This Coupon Today ■■ 

■ CHEERFUL CARD COMPANY 

■ Dept. 188. White Plains, N. Y. 

H Please rush samples and full details of your 
_ easy money-making plon. 

H Nfmc 
H Arlrlrctt 



City 

If .writing for an orgon- 
ization, give its name_ 



-State. 



91 




^ 

New summer I 
comfort 
for tired 
burning 
feet 



When tired feet cry out for relief, drive 
out fire and pain quickly with frosty 
Ice-Mint. Quick-acting medicinal Ice- 
Mint, with amazing, soothing lanolin, 
relaxes weary muscles wonderfully. 
Greaseless, stainless! Excellent for sun- 
burn and windburn! Ask your drug- 
gist for wonderful Ice-Mint today! 




FREE PHOTO 



Studio Porlrcit of your Favorife 

MOVIE or TV STAR 

Direct from Hollywood 
FREE: Catalog lilting thousands of Movls 

and T.V. Stars 
FREE: Hov/ to get Addresses, Birthdays, 

and photos of Stors' Homes. 
Send Name of your Favorite Starr and tSc tor 
handling (2 for 25c) 

STAR STUDIOS, BOX 46222 
Depl. P-8 Hollywood 46, Cotif. 



i/mff com ^''^ii jsCx" s^® 



k New IrtvinffCoiorProcess Christmas Cards sell fast 

I from FREE Samples— you keep $1.00 cash on every 

V box! Also profits to 100% on biggest selection of 

CHRISTMASX Gift Novelties, newest SUM CARDS. 7 Personal Lines, 

fAOft / Children's items, etc. New Catalog Shopping Plan, Year- 

^ / Round Gallery Display, Bargain Specials boost earningsl 

Sensaiion/ No experience needed. Get Assortments on 

approval. Imprints and Color Catalog FREE, 

BOULEVARD ART PUBLISHERS 

235 S. Wabash Ave.,Dept.S40-B, Chicago 4, Illinois 



ENLARGEMENT 

o/youf 7-ai/0f/f€ Photo 



FROM FAMOUS HOLLYWOOD FILM STUDIOS 

1^ Just to get acquainted, we will 
^ make you a beautiful studio qual- 
S ity 5 X 7 enlargement of any snap- 
i^ shot, photo or negative. Be sure 
\> to include color of hair, eyes and 

' clothing, and get our Bargain 

Si-toSSSflTTTvS Offer for having your enlarge- 
^JTfTiikiWWW jjjg^j beautifully hand-colored m 
oil and mounted in a handsome frame. Limit 2 
to a customer. Please enclose 10^ to cover cost of 
handling and mailing each enlargement. Origmal 
returned. We will pay $100.00 for children's or 
adults pictures used in our advertising,. Act NOW! 

HOLLYWOOD FILM STUDIOS, Dept. F-96 

7021 Santa Monica Blvd., Hollywood 38, Calif. 



92 



Nagging Backache 
Sleepless Nights 

Nag^ng backache, headache, or muscular aches and 
pains may come on with over-exertion, emotional up- 
sets or day to day stress and strain. And folks who 
eat and drink unwisely sometimes suffer mild bladder 
irritation. . .with that restless, uncomfortable feeling. 

If you are miserable and worn out because of 
these discomforts, Doan's Pills often help by their 
pain relieving action, by their soothing effect to ease 
bladder irritation, and by their mild diuretic action 
through the kidneys— tending to increase the output 
of the 15 miles of kidney tubes. 

So if nagging backache makes you feel dragged- 

out, miserable with restless, sleepless nights . . . 

don't wait . . . try Doan's Pills . . . get the same happy 
relief millions have enjoyed for over 60 years. Get 
Doan's Pills today 1 



no one bothered about music lessons for 
Eydie. When it turned out that she did 
have a fund of musical talent inside her, 
there was only one way to get it out. Ey- 
die sang. 

She sang with the band and in musicals 
at the William Howard Taft High School. 
She was the peppiest cheerleader of them 
all. And, of most importance, she knew a 
boy named Ken Greengrass whose ambi- 
tion was to lead a band, and who also 
thought Eydie was the greatest in the 
voice department. 

She took a job with a theatrical-supply 
export company after graduation, and 
went to night classes in economics at City 
College. But Ken Greengrass kept in touch 
with her, gave her weekend singing dates 
with his band, and finally persuaded her 
that her future was in singing, and that 
his was in managing her. 

Thus, together, they embarked on a 
kaleidoscope of activity. She made demon- 
stration records, and Tommy Tucker heard 
and hired her. She made a road tour and 
then sang with Tex Beneke's band, which 
was playing on the Steel Pier in Atlantic 
City. She was a hit, and toured the coun- 
try with Tex for a year. 

By this time, Eydie had her feet on the 
ground. She was no longer a fresh kid 
with a young, good — but sometimes unsure 
— voice. She knew something about the 
world outside The Bronx, she was learning 
about clothes and poise, and she was de- 
veloping a style all her own. Ken booked 
her as a "single" in such plush night spots 
as Giro's in Miami, the Copa City in Pitts- 
burgh, and found her a lot of theater dates, 
radio and television guest spots. 

Coral Records picked her up from there 



— and Steve Allen found her at Coral 
Records. 

It is hard to believe that such a beauti- 
ful girl as Eydie is not seriously in love. 
But it's also true that, up until now, she 
has concentrated on her career, and most 
of her dates have been casual, with no 
time to develop into anything permanent. 
She'd had the usual dates in high school, 
sometimes drove to the beach with a boy- 
friend and some other couples for a day of 
swimming. But she had never really dis- 
covered the true delight of sand and surf 
until, after a brief illness, she was sent to 
Miami for a two weeks' rest, stayed three 
months — and fell in love twice, though the 
romances didn't survive her return to 
New York. 

Now, with Tonight's exciting junkets 
first to Florida and then to California, 
she's getting all the fun of vacation, while 
still working too hard to fall in love. At 
home in New York, she lives with her par- 
ents in the same fourth-floor walk-up 
apartment in The Bronx where she lived 
before success touched her with its magic 
wand. After her performances on Tonight 
— or after a full-dress date on weekends, 
or a Sunday drive in the country — she 
climbs the four flights of stairs with a 
sense of warm security and of coming 
home, where the people and the furniture 
and her own bedroom will be as they al- 
ways were in a less abundant but also less 
hurried, less exacting time in her life. 

And if, as she reaches her room, she 
finds herself dreaming of that home of her 
own, with a husband and children — well, 
Eydie Gorme is young and warm and 
alive, and she knows the future still 
stretches enticingly before her. 



Most Sincerely Yours 



(Continued from page 68) 
all over the U. S. have had the paying cus- 
tomers crying for more. "It has been said," 
Ted Mack noted, with paternal pride, "that 
not since Frank Sinatra has a young bari- 
tone leaped to such national prominence 
in such a short time. . . ." 

Ted talked about blonde, blue-eyed 
Elise Rhodes, who left the Matinee tem- 
porarily to rehearse for her ingenue role 
in "Phoenix '55," a New York stage revue 
. . . and he spoke of the Honey Dreamers, 
that sprightly singing quintet — two girls, 
three boys — I'd just heard contributing to 
the melody of the Matinee . . . they'd 
started singing together, said Mr. Mack, 
when they were undergraduates at St. 
Olaf College in Minnesota, soon had a ra- 
dio engagement in Minneapolis, then did 
187 weeks of radio in Chicago. Since then, 
the Honey Dreamers have guested on the 
Eddie Fisher, Kay Kyser and Steve Allen 
shows, on We The People, Garroway At 
Large, The Stork Club and other programs 
. . . and they record a large percentage of 
the singing commercials you hear. . . . 

Ted Mack talked about other talent he 
has show-cased, for varying lengths of time, 
on the Matinee . . . about songstress Beth 
Parks, "our little sweetheart from Glas- 
gow, Scotland" . . . about the twelve- 
year-old girl ventriloquist he pet-named 
"Angel" . . . about young Eddie Manson, 
virtuoso of the harmonica . . . and about 
the budding talent — singers, tap dancers, 
violinists, magicians — the Amateur Hour 
sends over to him every day, "so we can 
audition them right here on TV!" 

Another trait which makes your Mr. 
Mack "different" — a friend as well as an 
impresario — is that he is interested in the 
talent he show-cases, not only as perform- 
ers, but as people. As with Dick Lee, he 
knows about them, where they come from, 
the things they care about. 



When his youngsters leave the Matinee 
to go into a play, a movie, other programs 
or the concert stage, he is sorry — in the 
way a father is sorry — to see the young 
'uns leave him, but happy for them, and 
hopeful . . . and always the door is open 
for them to come back to the Matinee. 

He talked about the talent he will audi- 
tion and show-case in the future, for he is 
constantly seeking out new talent and 
working out new methods by which to 
bring out the talent in the young people 
he auditions, before he presents them. 

He talked, in short, about everyone but 
himself. 

When a man has spent most of his life 
turning the spotlight on others, he isn't 
likely to be an egotist. Or an exhibitionist. 
Such a man must be, come to think of it, 
uncommonly modest in his own esteem 
. . . just as, it appears, your friend Ted 
Mack has always been. "A different kind 
of showman," is the way he's described by 
those who-knew-him-when, "a reluctant, 
retiring person who nonetheless attracted 
a following that was eventually to be 
numbered in the millions." He is still "a 
different kind of showman" ... as his 
dressing room — which could be papered, 
floor to ceiling, with the honors, citations 
and testimonials accorded him — ^bears bare 
witness! 

When asked for his autograph, show- 
man Mack looks gun-shy. When crowds 
gather, he withdraws. An extremely well- 
built, above-average good-looking man, 
he doesn't take much of an interest in 
clothes. He'll never, he prophesies, make 
a Ten-Best-Dressed List! He is seldom to 
be seen at the Stork Club, 21, the Copa, or 
any of the big-league bistros where other 
stars of show biz foregather to eat, drink, 
and be seen . . . only when he entertains 
out-of-town visitors; only, in short, when 
he has to. Mostly he rushes for a train. 



when work is done, in order to get home. 
Ted honestly does not like to talk about 
himself. Or about his home life. Nor does 
Marguerite, the one, first and only Mrs. 
Mack — with whom Ted recently celebrated 
his 29th wedding anniversary — take kind- 
ly to publicity about her home and mar- 
riage. After spending more than twenty 
years on tour with "Ted Mack and Band," 
living in hotel rooms, gypsying, the pri- 
vacy of home is pretty precious to Mar- 
Lguerite. And to Ted. 

"All the more so," Ted explained, ''be- 
cause it is the first home of our own, the 
rst real home, we have ever had. We 
bought it in 1950. It's a medium-sized 
combination of white brick and frame, 
nth about an acre of land, up the Hud- 
'son, about twenty miles out of New York. 
Even if I wanted to talk about life at home, 
Jhere isn't a great deal to tell. We're pretty 
r. and Mrs. Average American, I'd say. 
"We work some around the place. For 
istance, I built the terrace that overlooks 
le river and added a room myself, which 
is used as my study. My wife planted trees, 
did the landscaping, does the gardening. 
Other than as carpenter and bricklayer, 
I'm not a very handy man around the 
house. Can't cook. Don't cook. Figure that 
fthe time I'd take learning a recipe, or 
planting a plant, I could be riding a horse! 
~7e both like to ride horseback. I have a 
ronderful Arabian horse, my good friend 
'lidaan. Marguerite has a good little 
Eow pony. Rancher. 
"There are some 90 miles of canter paths 
our area, on and around the Rockefel- 
'ler estate, which make for good riding. We 
have a dog, a female English setter. We do 
a moderate amount of very relaxed enter- 
taining. We haven't any particular extrava- 
gance, although I must admit it's im- 
possible for me to pass a hardware or 
stationery store. And now and again, I get 
whims — think it's a great idea to get my 
hands on all the paintings I can afford, 
then on all the cameras. Or I'll wake up 
and find I've bought all the golf putters 
, I'm liable to need in a lifetime! 

"And," Ted grinned, "although I like to 
ik that I am not overly possessive, and 
|ertainly not a hoarder, I find myself go- 
ig through my desk and finding it literal- 
impossible to believe I won't someday 
keed this old ball of twine, that frayed 
|ld address book, this or that rheumatic 
ountain pen! As a healthy antidote to this 
EoUyer-Brothers trait in me, my wife 
fthrows out everything — everything." 

Along with his disinterest in talking 

|about himself, your Mr. Mack can think of 

practically nothing to wish for himself. 

le did say he'd once wished he could — 

id thought he probably would — build a 

ittle place on one of the Thousand Islands 

to which he'd flown, occasionally, for the 

Ishing. He learned to fly, in fact, because 

Ihe visualized himself taking off for the 

{Islands whenever he was free to do so. 

"But the farther away I got from it," 

le smiled, "the less wishful thinking I 

lid about it. And when a test pilot I got 

to know said, one day, 'Flying is not for 

'business people, flying is for pilots,' that 

iid it!" 

In Virginia, some fifty miles south of 

iWashington, D. C, there is a small herd of 

iHereford cattle (fifty in all) which belong 

to Mr. Mack, who loves cows and horses 

Pand once thought — wishfully — that, when 

he retired, he might have cows, horses and 

a farm. Of course he never will. He said 

ias much: "Maybe I can have my cows, 

iorses, and a farm, before I retire — if I 

pver do, which seems unlikely. I love what 

I'm doing." 

He does, indeed, love what he's doing 

. . for his entire wish, his one and only 

wish is: "That otur show, the Matinee, 

stays on the air long enough for me to 



present all these young people I've had 
tucked in the back of my mind for so long. 
Literally for years, I've been thinking 
about and talking about all the bright 
young performers in America who have 
everything it takes — except a spotlight! On 
The Original Amateur Hour, we auditioned 
— over a period of twenty-one years — 
more than 800,000 boys and girls, of which 
number more than 16,000 have gone on 
to successful jobs. Now I want to do 
something for the 'undiscovered' profes- 
sionals. And now I am enabled to do some- 
thing for them, for the basis on which we 
put our Matinee show is that of giving 
these youngsters the largest audience — 
coast to coast — it is possible for them to 
have, instead of being cached away, as 
many of them have been, in let's say," he 
laughed, "the Lotus Garden in Cincinnati!" 
In his home town on the Hudson as on 
mike at the Ambassador Theater, Ted is in 
there pitching for the kids. He and Mar- 
guerite are instrumental in fund-raising 
for recreational facilities, or for any proj- 
ect that will benefit the local youngsters. 
They help the home-town kids put on 
their school plays. Ted has sometimes 
had units sent up from his show in town 
to increase ticket sales. And, if there were 
any juvenile delinquency in his town, Ted 
would certainly be on hand to help. 

r or it is not only young people with 
the smell of greasepaint in their nostrils 
in whom Ted is interested. All this past 
year, he has been shopping for a site 
where he can build a camp for teen-age 
boys and girls. 

"A camp," he said, "where the emphasis 
would be on getting good coaches for the 
youngsters in any or all of the fields — • 
from Acting to Zoology — in which they 
might be interested . . . where the em- 
phasis would also be on getting outstand- 
ing individuals, leaders in the different 
fields, to come to camp, sit around the 
campfire and talk with the kids. For a 
youngster interested in the violin to find 
out from Yehudi Menuhin himself how 
he became the great artist he is ... or for 
a boy with a turn for business to hear 
from the head of an industrial company 
how he got to be head of the company . . . 
this would be to give him inspiration and 
to instill respect. Scholarships for out- 
standing citizenship will be awarded in this 
camp I will one day— and in some way — 
have. Human dignity will, in other words, 
be rewarded. 

"I am certainly no authority on the sub- 
ject of juvenile delinquency, its causes or 
its cure. But I think there is a point in 
every young person's life when, because 
he is growing up and trying to be an in- 
dividual, he rebels against adult domina- 
tion — and that this point is the danger 
point. The danger point because, at this 
point, they need leadership. They want 
leadership. If they haven't got a leader, 
that is when — and why — they follow the 
fellow who gets them into trouble! 

"It is a necessity to have trained leisure- 
time activity — some good strong activity — 
for our teenagers. If a community will sup- 
ply this, that's great. If not, it should be 
put on the tax rolls. That we could be a 
little smarter about this need, and how to 
meet it, is my wish. 

"And that is why I wish the show may 
go on until I have given all the bright 
young performers, who are America's 'iin- 
discovered' professionals, their largest 
audience. It is also why I wish to have — 
and am working toward — the end where 
I will someday be able to have my camp 
for youngsters of many talents." 

That's the sincere, heartfelt message 
from your Mr. Mack, who is, indeed, your 
best friend . . . whoever you are, wher- 
ever you are, whatever your dream is. 





Now you can look smart and 
stylish with sensational low 
priced glamorous used dresses 
that have been cleaned and 
pressed — in good condition for 
all occasions! A tremendous as- 
sortment of gorgeous one and 
two piece modern styles in all 
beautiful colors — in a variety of 
luxurious fabrics of rayons, cot- 
tons, gabardines, woolens, silks, 
etc. Expensive dresses — original 
value up to $40! 

FREE! 12 Different Sets of But- 
ton Cards! 5 to 8 matched but- 
tons on each card. Worth a few 
dollars — but yours FREE with 
dress order. 



MONEY BACK GUARANTEE COUPON! 

I GUILD MAIL ORDER HOUSE, Dept. 816 i 

lOne of the oldest end largest mail order houses of its kind! 

t 103 E. Broadway, New York 2, N. Y. 

Rush my 5 assorted dresses in size circled below 
with Free Button Cards. Enclosed find $1 de- 
posit, balance C.O.D. plus postage. Money re- 
turned if not completely satisfied, Canadian and 
foreign orders accepted. 
Circle Size: 

Girl's Sizes 7, 8, 10, 12, 14 are 5 for $2.75 
Junior Miss Sizes 9, 11, 13. 15 are 5 for $3.75 . 

' Sizes 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 38, 40, 42, 44, 5 for $3.75 I 

ISizes 14]4, 16y2,l8;-4,20!^.22'X.24i^,5for$3.75l 
I Extra Large Sizes 46. 48, 50, 52 are 5 for $4.75 | 
I D Check here to save C.O.D. fee. Send full | 
I amount with 2 5<^ postage. ■ 

, n Please send FREE CATALOG FOR FAMILY ! 

} Name j 

I Address I 

L_City,^..__^.^.___.. 



Zone State 



93 



94 



Callouses, Tenderness, Pain, 
Burning at Ball of Foot? 



Ball-o-,foot 

Cushion 



^OOPS OVER TOE 

QUICK RELIEF 
BEYOND BELIEF! 

Made of soft LATEX 
FOAM and NYLON 

You Actually WALK 
ON CUSHIONS! 



It's entirely NEW! Never before anything like it 
for relieving painful callouses, tenderness, burning 
at ball of foot! The cushion — not you — absorbs 
shock of each step. Dr. SchoU's BALL-O-FOOT 
Cushion loops over toe. No adhesive. Flesh color. 
Washable. Worn invisibly. $1.00 pair at Drug, Shoe, 
Dept., 5-10^ Stores and Dr. Scholl's Foot Comfort* 
Shops. If not obtainable locally, order direct, enclos- 
ing $1.00 and state if for woman or man. 
DR. SCHOLL'S, INC., Dept. STB, Chicago 10, III. 



DEHTALHURSm 



frepare now tor a well-paid career. 
Learn chairside and reception tech- 
nique. X-ray, lab, personality develop- 
' ment. Simplified, personal instruction. If 
you are between 17 and SO, you can begin 
in spare time at home and shorten class- 
work. Write now for FREE booklet. 

-M__WAYNE SCHOOL Lab. l-io 

Umj£iS^2S21 Sheffield Ave., Chicago 14, III. 




LV ,-, 



f/?5f/'=y 325 PICTURES 



With your order of TV and Movie 
Stars. One beautiful Scene from a 
latest production FREE. It's NEW 
and, has never been offered before! 

12/or 15<-28/or25^-64/orS0< 

LUCKY STARS Dapt. T-3 
G. P. O. Bex 738, NEW YORK 1, N. Y. 




fieed mte mneij? 



, bnow null v»-""-< 



Here's how to earn money last ! ' 
Simply show friends brand new 
SUM-SHAPED Christmas Cards. ^ _ 
Also personal cards, notes and wrappings, gilts -over 1 
items. They sell on sight... you make big profits. Send no 
money-hut WRITE TODAY for assortments on approval/ 
and let FREE pen with liey chain lor prompt action.'' 
CHAS. C. SCHWER CO.. 252 Elm St.WesK.eld, Moss 



LEG SUFFERERS 

Why continue to suffer without attempt- 
ing to do something? Write today for New 
Booklet — "THE LIEPE METHODS FOR 
HOME USE." It tells about Varicose 
Ulcers and Open Leg Sores. Liepe Methods 
used wkiU you walk. More than 60 years of 
success. Praised and en-i 
dorsed by multitudes. 
LIEPE METHODS, 32S0 N. Green Bay Ave., L 
Dept. H-47, IMIIwaukee 12, Wisconsin! 




FREE 

BOOKLET 



SHORTHAND 



a IN 6 WEEKS 



Age 



Write 120 words per minute, 
no obstacle— LOWEST COST 



Famous SPEEDWRITING shorthand. No symbols, 
no machines, uses ABC's. Easiest to learn and use. 
Fast preparation tor a better position. Natlonallyused 
In leading offices and Civil Service. 120 words per 
minute — 507« FASTER than Civil Service require- 
ments. Over 300.000 taught at home or through 
classroom Instruction. The very low cost will sur- 
prise you. Typing available. 32nd Year. Schools In 
over 400 cities In U. S., Canada, Cuba and Hawaii. 
WRITE FOR FREE BOOKLET TO SCHOOL OF 




New Star in the Sky 



(Continued from page 36) 
with that beat — wherever it should lead. 

He'd meant to give Stanford the full 
college try. But, back in school for his 
senior year, after that exciting warm-up 
with his own CBS Radio show, it had 
seemed that he was just marking time. 

In college, Gary had felt that he was 
excelling at nothing. "That's what was 
bothering me," he says now, with his 
typical honesty. "I didn't think I was 
doing much good in school. I wasn't break- 
ing any records scholastically, athletically 
or any other way. I wasn't proving any- 
thing either way. I wanted to see what 
I could do in show business — if anything." 

That's what he'd said when he got 
home: "I can always go back." But no- 
body could know better than Bing Crosby 
— who never headed his own jalopy back 
to Spokane — that, once you get with the 
beat, you don't get away. He knew Gary 
was home in Hollywood to stay. 

loday, Bing's Gary is soloing into that 
same wild blue yonder where his father 
is still king. Singing in the face of a 
challenge such as few in show business 
have ever known. Knowing that his own 
voice will always be compared with the 
most endearing and the most enduring 
voice in all the land. 

Gary has an answer for any professional 
mourners. "Sure — I could be scared," he 
says now quietly. "Who couldn't be? You 
could be real scared, if you think about it 
too much. But you cap't let yourself feel 
that way about it. That would be ridicu- 
lous. If you took the negative view and 
cried on everyone's shoulder — who would 
ever respect you?" 

Sure, there will always be some wise- 
acres around who're ready to make a big 
thing of his being Bing's son. "But I 
could be compared with a whole lot 
worse," he goes on, in a tone which says 
he doubts whether he could be compared 
with any better. As for their voices hav- 
ing the same quality: "Nobody has a voice 
like Dad's — and nobody's ever been able 
to grow one." 

He just sings the way he feels and lets 
the notes fall where they may. "And I 
can't sing ballads, anyway. I'm pretty 
leaky on those. You've got to learn to 
sing ballads. I'm better on rhythm tunes." 

Gary's also the first to agree that being 
Bing's son did help him to get heard. That 
it isn't likely a newcomer to radio would 
have his own half-hour CBS network 
show "with no more experience than I've 
had — without that first assist from Dad. 
It would have taken a whole lot longer 
than this." What he doesn't add, however, 
is that — once that door was opened — it 
was up to Gary Crosby to stay there. 

For a fellow as modest as Gary's father 
to comment aloud on Gary's challenge to 
show business is very difficult. It neces- 
sitates Bing Crosby's admitting, first of all, 
that he himself has really got somewhere. 
The closest he comes is to say he realizes 
that Gary is living "in the shadow of some- 
thing already built up." (Which is prob- 
ably the understatement of all time.) But 
Bing doesn't hesitate to add his faith that: 
"Gary has all the equipment it takes to 
handle this. He has plenty of talent, and 
he's getting the opportunity now to exer- 
cise it. I believe he'll eventually do some- 
thing. He's getting all wound up now. . . ." 

Wound up or no, there's one thing Gary 
has always known — he had to sing. "I just 
like it instinctively, and I want to go 
ahead. I don't know how good I am — or 
whether I ever will be good. But I have 
to try." 

Since Bing has watched so many others 
come and go in his profession, Bing's con- 



cern has been whether or not Gary was 
sufficiently prepared to step in so suddenly 
and snowball along. 

"It's much tougher to hang up your 
shingle in the entertainment field today," 
he says. "The going was a lot easier when 
some of the rest of us started out. And 
Gary never did much in show business 
until the last year. We never even talked 
show business much around our house." 

Through his boys' more impressionable 
years, Bing was concentrating on raising 
young citizens — not celebrities. Actually, 
he kept Gary and his brothers as far re- 
moved from Hollywood as possible, to 
shield them from any dangers of such 
inflation, and to keep them from growing 
up identified as "Bing Crosby's kids." 

But Gary's own destiny was shaping up, 
even then. By the time Gary was four- 
teen, Bing admitted that Gary had "good 
intonation and rhythm, and might well be 
a singer" — if he so chose. At Bellarmine 
Prep, Gary took part in school plays, 
emceed variety shows, played a pretty 
hot drum, and organized a singing sextet 
who called themselves, "The Happy In- 
mates." About this time, too, Gary re- 
corded "Play a Simple Melody," backed 
by "Sam's Song" with his dad. It was a 
smash hit. 

Then, one evening, a boyish baritone 
swung out on Bing's radio show with 
"Dear Hearts and Gentle People" — to an 
ovation from the San Francisco studio 
audience. Wires and offers poured in. It 
was evident the folks were taking to their 
own hearts a new groaner, junior grade. 
Gary's parents must have felt that this 
was now destined to be. Gary has care- 
fully treasured a wire he got from Dixie 
Crosby, which reads: "Just heard your 
show. Didn't even recognize your voice. 
You sound like an old man and I don't 
mean Uncle Everett. All my love, 
Mommie." 

Ask Gary about the reviews he gets at 
home, now that he's rolling, and he grins, 
"Ain't nobody at our house gonna say 
anything. Dad says I sound better on the 
high notes. That's about all." His broth- 
ers. Private Phillip Crosby, now stationed 
at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, and Private 
Dennis Crosby, now in Germany, have 
expressed some interest, Gary goes on: 
"They want to know about the loot. How 
much money I'm making and if I'm going 
to be able to support them. I'm just kid- 
ding, of course. Uncle Sam keeps them 
too busy to listen to me." 

Gary's goal is to make his own place in 
show business. And he's going in swing- 
ing, with the same determination which 
the Fathers saw when he was a fighting 
fullback at Ballarmine. As they've said, 
"You could always tell Gary was in the 
game, all right. He has a great competi- 
tive spirit. He's a very determined boy 
with great drive. He really hits hard— 
and he takes a lot of punishment." They 
well remember instances when he was 
dazed and injured in play and should have 
been taken out— but stayed the whole 
game, anyway. 

In today's far more competitive sport, 
Gary's tackling show business with the 
same determination. When he isn't at 
CBS, he's rehearsing at Buddy Bregman's 
home, trying out new arrangements. He 
watches rehearsals of other shows. He all 
but saturates himself with music. He 
works out constantly at a health club, 
pulling weights and playing handball, fur- 
ther trimming down his muscular build. 
And, whatever he does, he's his own con- 
stant and severest critic. Other critics 
lauded Gary's guest appearance on Jack 
Benny's television show. But Gary's own 



comment is: "Now I know why people 
divide when they meet me on the street. 
But it isn't just the body — it's the face 
that bothers me!" 

But where, not long ago, many of those 
wise to show business wouldn't have 
given Gary Crosby's spot to an enemy, 
now even the skeptics — and all the vocal- 
hopeful's who've long looked forward to 
the day Bing Crosby would rest on his 
still growing laurels and get tired truck- 
ing away all the money Bob Hope says he 
has — are becoming resigned to the fact 
that, as long as the blue of the night con- 
tinues to meet the gold of the day, a 
Crosby wiU continue to be there. . . . 

For, a few months ago, destiny really 
moved in. Gary signed a CBS contract 
calling for regular appearances as vocal- 
ist on Tennessee Ernie's Monday-through- 
Friday radio program, six guests shots on 
top CBS television shows, and a starring 
spot with his own show. He's a Decca 
recording artist, with current releases 
niunbering Buddy Bregman's Hawaiian 
rhythm-and-blues number, "Ayuh-Ayuh," 
"Mississippi Pecan Pie," and "Truly" and 
"Higgly Piggly" with the Paris Sisters. 

As of June 26th, he's rolling with The 
Gary Crosby Show. For how long? "As 
long as I can stay on. . . ." 

Which should be quite some time, in 
the experienced opinion of Murdo Mc- 
Kenzie, Gary's producer, who also co- 
produces Bing's radio show and has been 
associated with him for twenty years. As 
Murdo says, "The great thing about Gary 
is his wonderful natural talent for rhythm 
and for finding the beat — which is lacking 
in many of the current-day singers. He's 
very bright, he learns easily, and he loves 
the business. With no more experience 
than Gary's had, it's phenomenal how he 
can step up to the mike, carrying the 
whole show on his back, and handle him- 
self so professionally." 

Adding to this, Buddy Bregman, Gary's 
brilliant young musical director — who's 
also associated with Ethel Merman's shows 
and some of television's top "spectacu- 
lars" — notes Gary's eagerness to learn and 
his willingness to cooperate: "He's so 
modest about the whole bit — the easiest 
person I've ever worked with. Gary asks 
your opinion and he takes it. He always 
wants the truth from you. None of that 
fawning and yessing and Hollywood jazz. 
He's always asking whether he's right 
on something. He doesn't think he's any 
good — but he is. Talk about 'humility' — " 

For his own happiness and peace of 
mind, Gary has a little too much humility. 
He's always running himself down. That 
he has the courage to face up to today's 
challenge — and step out on that stage at 
all — is all the more commendable, when 
one knows him and realizes just how much 
humility he has. His own thoughts, for in- 
stance, when he looks at those teenagers 
in his simimer audiences now: "They 
really scare me. I guess that's because it 
hasn't been any time since I was on their 
side of the stage, too, and I remember that 
whole bit too well. I know what I thought 
— and what they're probably thinking now. 
'Get him! Who does he think he is?'" 

Contrary to the opinion of some who 
don't know him, Bing's Gctry has almost 
no ego, which can be both a blessing and 
a torment. At first meeting, his shyness 
is sometimes mistaken for conceit, and his 
inexperience — fired by his own self-doubt 
— for arrogance. He dies when he thinks 
he's fluffed. He's sure he can't sing a 
ballad. He's sure he isn't photogenic, and 
he's the photographers' despair, just get- 
ting him to pose. He's uncomfortable 
whenever he feels conspicuous, and get- 
ting him to sing at a party or a club is 
out. Nobody understands this better than 



Gary's best friends, Jack Haley, Jr. and 
Les Gargan (son of the William Gargans) 
who can also appreciate what any celeb- 
rity's son is up against — on or off stage: 
"You're prejudged before people even 
know you. Automatically, they think 
you're stuck-up. Gary won't ever sing 
when we're out anywhere. He's afraid 
somebody will think he's showing off. And 
you can't even win this way, either. Then 
they think you're too stuck-up to sing!" 
Gary's probably the only audible and 
animate object in any household Ed Mur- 
row's encountered who hasn't been home. 
When Miirrow visited Bing Crosby Person 
To Person, Gary enjoyed watching his dad 
and Lin (the fourth Crosby son) from the 
Haleys' house. Asked why he absented 
himself, Gary said typically, "Why should 
I spoil the show?" 

rlis family is long familiar with Gary's 
reviews of his own work. But sometimes 
the Crosbys' housekeeper, Georgia Hard- 
wick, will finally say, "Gary — quit knock- 
ing yourself." For, when he does this, 
he's also knocking one of her favorite men 
of song. He's been a favorite since the age 
of six, when he was belting out nursery 
rhymes. "Georgie" — as they all affection- 
ately call her — was employed by Dixie and 
Bing as the children's nurse fifteen years 
ago. Since the children are now all grown- 
up, according to Georgie, she's a "house- 
keeper" today. Actually, she's a "house- 
mother" for the whole Crosby clan. So, 
when she says, "Gary's a good kid — our 
kids are all good kids," she knows where- 
of she speaks. 

And she's so right. Gary Crosby is 
a very sensitive and a very vulnerable 
and warmly likable twenty-two-year-old. 
Around those he knows, his conversation 
is crew-cut, his answers glib, and his 
wisecracks fast. Nobody could write his 
"material," except another member of the 
Crosby clan. But his eyes are serious and 
watchful and his movements are quick 
and tense. Generally, he's more comfort- 
able around older people. And, generally, 
he's almost too serious-minded for his age. 
But, when he starts free-wheeling about 
college days and dear old Zeta Psi and 
the fraternity gang, the years drop away: 
"Stanford's such a great school. It's a 
Phi Beta Kappa school. There are some 
fantastic minds attending there. I think 
I stepped a little out of my league — even 
the football players pulled down A's!" 

Gary pulled down his best grades in 
English literature and in anything that 
had to do with his major, which was 
drama and speech. "But required courses 
— like science courses — they murdered me. 
I went through Biology 1 two or three 
times. Economics, I don't like, either. I'd 
have gone around that one again, if it 
hadn't been for my professor, 'Doc' Fagan. 
He had a homey way of talking and mak- 
ing with the gags — all the guys liked him. 
I pulled down an A in Economics 1. Then 
came Economics 2 — I never did quite get 
through that." 

Gary says he can't give Lin much help 
on his homework. "He knows more than 
I do. Lin's one of those moaners. He 
comes home from school crying and moan- 
ing, 'I'll never pass this course.' Then 
comes the end of the course — and a 
straight 98. Makes you sick," Gary grins. 

To Gary — used to strict study supervi- 
sion from the Fathers at Bellarmine Prep 
— Stanford University at first seemed like 
a strange sort of scholastic Utopia where 
nobody told you to study and nobody 
seemingly cared. But, just before the 
semester ended and he found he was in 
danger of being washed out of school, he 
rapidly saw the light. It's typical of Gary 
that, faced with this sudden challenge, he 
reacted as usual. He knuckled down and 



al 



"^ 




PERMANENT DARKEN ER ["^"l^t"'" 

to wntcb 

FOR LASHES AND BROWS oppf.ed 

• One opplicotion losts 4 to S weeks! 
"Dark-Eyes" — so easy fo apply — 
is the perfect way to make eyelashes 
and brows come beautifully alive 
. . . completely natural looking. 
"Dark-Eyes" is NOT A MASCARA! 
Eliminates the bother of daily eye 
make-up. It is PERMANENT, 
SWIMPROOF, TEARPROOF, 
SMUDGEPROOF AND SMEARPROOFl 

25 c Ideal to "touch-up" those first gray bairst 

$1.00 (plus tax) at leading drug, 
dept. and variety chain stores 



Send TODAY 
for TRIAL 
SIZE! 



I 



"DARK-EVES" COIVIPANY, Dept. P-8S 
3319 W. Carroll Ave., Chicago 24, III. 

I encloie 25c (coin or stomps— tax included) lor TRIAl SIZE 
PACKAGE of •Oorli.Eyei" with direclionl. 

cheek co/of: Q Black Q Brown 



Name 

Address^ 
Town 



ENLARGEMENT 

Plus 12 Keepsakes 



Glamorous black and white enlarge- 
ments 8x10 inch on double weight 
portrait paper 57c (2 for $t.OO). 
Gold tooled leatherette frames 57c 
(2 for $1.00). FREE! With any 
$2.00 order you get an extra 8x10 
enlargement free plus 12 small size 
keepsakes free. Oil coloring $1.00 
extra for each enlargement. State 
color of hair, eyes, etc. State choice 
of frames, brown or maroon. En- 
close 25c deposit or save all C.O.D. 

charges by sending full amount with order. Mail photos 
or films today. Originals safely returned. Act now. 
Dtpt. 833, Marvil Art. 1140 Roosfvtlt Read, Chieazo It Illinois 



/a^ 



fFflV^ 



ENJOY A PERMANENT, 
kBfG PAY CAREER as a 

Si\ PRACTICAL 
NURSE 



EARN AT HOME WHILE LEARNING 

FREE SAMPLE LESSON shows how easily you can 
become a professionally trained practical nurse 
by home study in a short time. NO HIGH 
SCHOOL NEEDED. No age limit. 

FOR FREE LESSON and 
FULL INFORMATION 



Post Graduate Hospital 
School of Nursing 
9085-B Auditorium BIdg. 
Chicago 5, Illinois 




Name 

Address 

City State. 



95 



96 



crammed and more than passed. Further- 
more, his fraternity voted him the "Fresh- 
man Achievement Award" — given to the 
freshman who's achieved the most and 
improved the most during that year. 
"You'd better not put that in," he says 
quickly, when informed you know about 
this. Obviously, in his case — he insists — 
there was considerably more room for im- 
provement. "And it's not hard for a guy 
to pull himself up with a wonderfuFbunch 
of guys like that, anyway." 

As a rule, Gary's clothes are more con- 
servative than his father's. He goes for 
quietly elegant silk suits and striped ties. 
But he insists he has his share of sports 
shirts, too. "I've got some dazzling ones 
I wear about the house now and then. 
And, now that summer's here, you'll see 
me breaking out in them." 

Although Gary insists "I don't go out 
too much," he goes for girls "with a good 
sense of humor and with a good person- 
ality, a girl who can carry on a decent 
conversation — I don't mean a lot of phony 
chatter, but somebody you can really talk 
to." He's also partial to girls "who — well — 
aren't — well — impressed with who they 
think you are . . . or — well — what they 
think you have ... a girl who — well — 
likes you for yourself," Gary says, his 
modesty giving him a little trouble with 
that one. Glamour? "I don't care much 
about looks. But, of course, if you can 
find a girl who's a good-looker along with 
those other things, you'd really be in 
business." 

Gary's chief claim to fame, according to 
Gary, is that he's already twice a god- 
father. One of his godsons is "Iron" John 
Callahan from Stanford University — "aged 
twenty-one," Gary grins. "He started tak- 
ing instructions in the church in Palo Alto 
and he wanted to be baptized there. He 
lives in Massachusetts and none of the 
family or their friends were there — so I 
did the godfather bit. You know, when 
you're a godfather, you promise you'll 
see your godchild is brought up properly 
and watch out in life for him. "This was 
really the blind leading the blind." 

Then, recently, Rosemary Clooney and 
Jose Ferrer asked Gary to be godfather 
for their baby son, Miguel Jose Ferrer. 
"I was really surprised. He's such a cute 
baby — I figured they could have done bet- 
ter than me. I believe originally they had 
Dad down for it, but he was out of town. 
So I stood in for him there. They got me 
cheaper, too. . . ." 

In addition to godfathering, loyalty is 
Gary's long suit. His friendship isn't given 
lightly, but if he likes you — you're in. 
And he makes every word good. Some 
time ago, he'd mentioned to Buddy Breg- 
man that, if his own show developed, he 
would have him conduct. In a town where 
people starve on promises that aren't kept. 
Buddy says: "When the time came, that 
was the picture — just as he'd said." And 
Buddy adds, "He takes all my 'dubs' home 
with him now. I don't have any of my 
own records at home. I did a score for a 
movie — you know, symphonic orchestra- 
tions and such — and Gary made off with 
all of them. Finally, I've found out why. 
'If anybody says you can't do anything but 
rhythm and blues — then Til pull these 
out,' he says. And he would." 

His well-exercised loyalty is reflective 
of both Dixie's and Bing's, as Gary him- 
self is a composite of both parents. "His 
mother had that same wonderful sense of 
loyalty Gary has," Mrs. Gargan says now. 
"Gary has a streak of tenderness from 
her, too, and he has Dixie's quick wit and 
whip mind — although his father's no slouch 
in this department, either. He also has 
Bing's sincerity — he's so sincere, in an at- 
mosphere where you don't always find too 



much. And so well-behaved, he's a joy 
to have around," she says affectionately. 
Gary's relaxed around friends like Les 
Gargan and Jack Haley, Jr. They're all 
children of show business and they can 
perform without being subjected to false 
flattery or criticism. They can talk show 
business together — and dream it tall. Their 
gang often gathers in the Gargans' spa- 
cious recreation room, where they watch 
fights on TV, rhubarb with the baseball 
teams, and occasionally have their own 
theater-in-the-round, doing take-offs of 
such films as "The Caine Mutiny." "We 
clown around and gorge ourselves with 
food and listen to the hi-fi," says Les. 
"We're all long-hairs — Eartha Kitt long- 
hairs. And sometimes we discuss our prob- 
lem parents." Les Gargan and Gary were 
born just one day apart, and usually cele- 
brate their birthdays together — "Gary's 
running into mine at midnight." 

But Gary's crew-cut crowd was im- 
pressed for all time with the fabulous din- 
ner party Bing gave Gary on his twenty- 
first birthday — which also marked the 
opening of his first CBS Radio show. From 
the moment Bing remarked to the Gargans, 
"I'm going to serve champagne to our 
twenty-one-year-olds," Gary's group was 
determined to live up to the dignity of 
that evening. Even then, it got a little 
away from them. Bing had invited about 
forty of Gary's friends and a number of 
his own to a seven o'clock champagne 
dinner — but they didn't eat until eight. 
Les Gargan went to Malibu to pick up his 
date, got caught in the Sunday bumper- 
to-bumper traffic. Buddy Bregman, who'd 
had no lunch, kept stage-whispering to 
Gary, inquiring "When do we eat?" 
(Then, during a lull in the conversation, 
he blasted out with, "If you don't feed 
me in five minutes — I'm going to Stan's 
Drive-In.") When Les Gargan finally 
walked in, "They were all waiting for 
me. I felt like the Wells-Fargo stage." 

But that evening still wasn't over. Bing 
had made reservations for Gary's crowd 
at the Moulin Rouge and he'd ordered 
another big birthday cake. "Gary and I 
had a whole act built up for the gendarmes 
when they questioned our age— but it 
died," Les recalls. "For once, they didn't 
even ask. We were both highly indignant 
about the whole thing." About ten to 
midnight, just as Les's mother was about 
to retire, she opened the door to find Gary 
standing there holding a cake "and about 
seventy-five people she'd never heard of 
following us in. You know how that is — 
the word gets around for a party or the 
reading of the will." They'd all come home 
with Les to help celebrate his birthday. 

Gary and his brothers always have their 
own problem, too, around Bing's birth- 
day. It's almost impossible to buy him 
anything, and they start huddling on it 
days ahead. Phil was coming in on leave 
this year and Denny was flying in, too, 
as a surprise that week. But what to give 
Bing — that was up to Gary and Lin. Their 
usual routine is to go through his things 
and try to find something to replace. 

This year Gary and Lin recalled quite 
a treasure hunt that had ensued when 
Bing tried to find an old English gabar- 
dine coat he wanted to wear that day to 
a ball game. Gary and Lin looked through 
their dad's closets — and finally found the 
coat. Bing had had it since 1947, and it 
had slick spots and a hole mended here 
and there. They found a number on the 
pocket, and discovered from the lining 
that it came from Tripler's in New York. 
They rushed an inquiry as to whether 
they could get a topcoat like the one 
their dad had purchased there eight years 
before. The night of Bing's birthday, 
they had his cake and gifts at the dinner 



table, as is the usual family custom. He 
was speechless when he saw the coat. 
"Where did you get this?" Then he con- 
fided, "You know, I've got another just 
like it — but it's getting pretty shot. . . ." 

Gary's home life is a far cry from that 
pictured so humorously on the Jack Benny 
television show. There are no butlers 
going AWOL wearing Hawaiian shirts. 
There's not even a butler. In their Holmby 
Hills place, Bing himself often answers the 
phone. On Friday night, Gary's friends 
have a tough time getting through. Not 
even Notre Dame could get through. This 
is Lin's first free night from school and, 
as Gary says, "He moves pretty good on 
weekends." 

They're a Warm and close family — closer 
than many would ever suspect, since "un- 
derplaying" is a Crosby family trait. For 
all the razzing back and forth, Gary would 
be the first to tell you that Lin has a 
future in show business. And it's Lirmy 
who sneaks the "dubs" of Gary's latest 
records out of his room into his own and 
plays them for Bing. As in many another 
American home, the whole beat of the 
house picks up when Phil and Denny are 
home on leave . . . and the beat really 
drags when the leaves are over — and they 
know Denny won't be back from Germany 
for two years. 

Other times, you'll usually find Gary's 
red Mercury parked near the back en- 
trance, where he can grab it on the fly 
and go. Bing's dog, "Cindy," a black La- 
brador retriever, wags a welcome as each 
member of the family drives in. In the 
impressive entrance hall hangs the ma- 
jestic hunting picture which Bing loves 
so much that they've always kidded him 
about buying a house large enough to 
hang it. And through the hall there some- 
times spreads the essence of that which 
smells suspiciously like Irish stew. 

Gary's is a house of music. There's a 
record-player in his room, one in Lin's 
room, and another their father uses in the 
library downstairs. And they've all been 
known to be going simultaneously. When 
Dixie was here — hers was usually going, 
too. Wherever one looks, one is reminded 
of her. Family photographs. Her collec- 
tions, which Bing still carefully preservesr 
"Topsy," her black French poodle. The 
coasters under your gingerale glass are 
still lettered in gold: "Dixie And Bing." 

In Gary's home, the head of the house, 
feeling his responsibility doubly today, 
gives a small prayer for God to go with 
them wherever the boys are. And, like 
any father, he sleeps easier when the 
final count says they're all back inside 
again. Gary's father keeps a far from 
casual blue eye on Gary's career, too. The 
greatest gift Gary can give him is to keep 
swinging and earning that sheepskin in 
show business, and make that name he 
wants to make for himself on his own. 

Bing's pride in Gary and his faith in 
him and his hopes for him all show when 
he says, "You know, it was quite an ab- 
rupt jump for him — right out of school 
into a weekly program of which he was 
the emcee and which he was supposed to 
control. And I suppose the jump could 
have been cushioned for him a little with 
some more experience in less responsible 
assignments, but I think he's over that 
hump now. . . ." 

For all Bing Crosby's modest acknowl- 
edgement about Gary growing in the 
"shadow of something that's already built 
up," nobody knows better than Gary's 
father how challenging and how over- 
powering that shadow could be. And no- 
body could be more proud now — watch- 
ing Gary go in swinging and singing his 
way out of the "shadow" to find his own 
place in the sun. 



Lustre - Creme 
Slianipoo... 




Cream or Lotion 



Yes, Ann BIyth uses Luslre-Creme 
Shampoo. It's tlie favorite of 4 out 
of o top Hollywood movie stars! 

It never dries your hair! Lustre- 
Creme Shampoo is blessed with 
lanolin . . . foams into rich lather, 
even in hardest water . . . leaves 
hair so easy to manage. 

It beautifies! For soft, bright, fra- 
grantly clean hair — without special 
after-rinses — choose the shampoo of 
America's most glamorous women. 
Use the favorite of Hollywood movie 
stars — Lustre-Creme Shampoo. 



Neve? Dries 



tifles ! 





co-starring in THE KING'S THIEF 
An M-G-M Production. 
In CinemaScope. In Color. 



'— Ku/e 



WINSTON 




WINSTON brings flavor back to filter smoking! 



■ Winston smokers believe that smoking 
should be fun. That means real flavor — full, 
rich, tobacco flavor — and Winston's really 
got it ! This filter cigarette tastes good — like 
a cigarette should ! 

Along with Winston's finer flavor, you get a 
filter that really does the job. The exclusive 
Winston filter vi^orks so effectively, yet lets 
you draw so easily and enjoy yourself so fully. 



S^^^ WINSTON tilt QOAL j-dnmjiMCi ^^ ckfcmittl 



R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co., 
Winston-Salem. N. C. 




HU>IO 
MIRROR 



NEW! 

FESS PARKER 

GODFREY S GANG 

HAL MARCH 



iDIO MIRROR'S N. Y., N. J., Conn. Edition 



NNIS 
JVIES 





JULIUS LA ROSA 

Living's Never Easy 




LOIS HUNT 

Lullaby for Baby 




GAIL DAVIS 

Winsome Annie Oakley 

25^ 



YOUR 3iCIIM VlflLL LOVE 




'There's nothing like it," 

says Mrs. Charles J. Gossner, 

a radiant Camay Bride. 

'Cold cream Camay is the perfect 

beauty soap as far as 

I'm concerned. It's so mild and 

gentle on my skin. And so 

delightfully fragrant!" 







I 



Let It help you 

to a softer, fresher, 

more radiant complexion ! 



It's a great day for your beauty when you discover the Caressing Care 

of cold cream Camay with its exclusive fragrance, luxurious lather, 

and skin-pampering mildness. It's no wonder gentle Camay 

is the beauty secret of so many exquisite brides. Let its tender touch 

caress j^owr skin to new loveliness, too. Change to regular care . . . 

u.sc Camay alone. You'll be delighted with the way your skin 

will become softer . . . smoother. And remember, you get the added 

luxury of fine cold cream in Camay at no extra cost. For your 

beauty and your bath, there's no finer soap in all the world! 




THE SOAP 



EAUTIFUL WOMEN 




THIS SPACE RESERVED 

for a tooth that must last for 63 years 



Protect your child's teeth with the tooth 
paste that destroys decay bacteria besF^ 

When that new tooth and its mates ar- 
rive, they face a lifetime of dangers. 

And here's a shocker: the average child 
loses one or more of his second teeth 
while stUL in his teens. 

*Fortiinately, new Ipana with WD-9 
is made especially to help you keep your 
children's teeth sound and healthy. It 
destroys tooth-decay bacteria better 
than any other leading tooth paste . . . 
including fluoride tooth paste. 

Teeth get remarkable protection with 
new Ipana because of decay-fighting 



WD-9. In Ipana's special formula, it 
works even in spaces too tiny for the 
tooth brush to reach. 

Why not start today to help keep your 
family's teeth sound and healthy — 
with the dentifrice that destroys decay 
bacteria better than any other lead- 
ing tooth paste? New-formula Ipana 
with WD-9. 

P. S. Because regular brushing is best, 
you'll be glad Ipana now has a fresh, 
new, minty flavor that coaxes kifjts and 
grown-ups to brush. 

Ipana A/C Tooth Paste (Ammoniated 

Chlorophyll) also contains bacteria-de- 

'^IJ stroyer WD-9 (Sodium Lauryl Sulfate) 







PRODUCTS OF GRISTOL-MYERS 



New-Fbrmula IPAN^lf with l/VD-9 

destroys decay bacteria better 
than any other leading tooth paste 



SEPTEMBER, 1955 




W RADIO 
MIRROR 

N.Y., N.J., Conn. Edition 



VOL. 44, NO. 4 



Ann Higginbotham, Editor ■* 

Ann Mosher, Executive Editor Jack Zasorin, Art Director 

Teresa Buxton, Managing Editor Frances Maly, Associate Art Director 

Ellen Taussig, Associate Editor Joan Clarke, Art Assistant 

Claire Safran, Assistant Editor Bud Goode, Ifest Coast Editor 



people on the air 

What's New from Coast to Coast by JiH Warren 6 

A Very Good Neighbor (Dennis James) by Ernst Jacobi 29 

Winsome Annie Oakley (Gail Davis) by Peer J. Oppenheimer 32 

A Mighty Man Is He (Fess Parker) by Fredda Dudley Balling 34 

Twice Blessed {Feather Your Nest) by Lilla Anderson 38 

Holiday Time for Godfrey • by Martin Cohen 40 

Happiness to Share (Frankie Laine) by Bud Goode 56 

Help Yourself to Living (Tod Andrews) by Ed Meyerson 58 

Stella Dallas (picture story from the beloved dramatic serial) 60 

He's a Big Boy Now (Julius La Rosa) by Ira H. Knaster 64 

Lois Hunt's Lullaby by Gladys Hall 66 

features in full color 

The $64,000 Question (Hal March) by Gregory Merwin 44 

Early to Love (Bill Hayes) by Frances Kish 46 

Unexpected Romance (Patricia Wheel) by Helen Bolstad 50 

TV Theatre Close-up (a survey of dramatic performers and shows) 52 

your local station 

At Ease with Mark Evans (WTOP-TV) 4 

Clubhouse Gang Comedies (WPIX) 8 

Mr. Matinee (WOR-TV ) 1* 

Hum and Strum (WJAR-TV) 24 

your special services 

12 
Steve Allen's Turntable 

New Designs for Living (needlecraft and transfer patterns) 

Daytime Diary 

Information Booth 

Inside Radio (program listings) 

TV Program Highlights 

Dress Patterns for You (smart wardrobe suggestions) 

Cover portrait of Dennis James by Jay Seymour 



»'•• 






^^^W 



buy your October copy early • on sale September 6 



PUBLISHED MONTHLY by Macfaddcn Publications. Inc., New 
S-^cJ^T-.v\, AOV.RT,S.NG AND -°'TOR.AL OFr.CE.S^^a^t 
205 East 42nd ,v'"-'S'; ■ ,.':,^ n,.ivi' llovc'rly Hills, Cnlit.. and 

|e'c°?e?S'''an'if''Tr^as,i?orr'Adie?tirin« omcs also In Ch.caBo 

and San F'"J'.'l?i?'^2-„TP€:. v% OO one year, U. S. and Posses- 
SU BSCB I PT ION R ATES. »3-"0 °,"^ / „,i 'other countries, 
si.ins and <-an=<Jj;-_*;ii';'Vw,-ouX' notice essential. When pos- 
CHANGE OF A"°"";, '' " ;.Vmine"'i>>n address from a re- 
Bible, please .'nrnl^n Jti-nc'i nnj i'- jj j.g„j us 

cent 's»^"'-.A1^,;;^'f«„J''=;;g;;-",f,:;;' LidrSs^ write to TV Radio 



or loss or Uillln»KV:. *- 

Member of the TRUE 



^rENT^i'k'^^'as second C.^ss Matter .t,ne 28 l„954,^at_^the 

?g^V°?5V^^g3Hl^?/g5'lf l..?;?il.d?n ?ub'?fc''a'tion°lf:?^?: 
Sri'Vifh\T?lse'??i;X'LM;^«na^a^ 

Color Printing Company. 
STOKY Women's Group 



You can lose him quick ^I'iien your 




starts slipping 




Take mary ann's case ... the very first 
day she arrived at the attractive little 
seaside hotel the best-looking man in the 
place latched on to her. And, before she 
knew it, she was in the middle of a gay 
whirl. They went everywhere together 
... to the beaches and to the nicest clubs. 

Then, all of a sudden, his interest 
turned to indifference. She simply 
couldn't account for it. What she didn't 
realize was that her charm had started 
slipping. It could happen to any girl . . . 
it could happen to you . . . when she lets 
halitosis (unpleasant breath) get the 
upper hand. 

Listerine Antiseptic does for you what 



no tooth paste does. Listerine 
instantly kills germs — stops 
bad breath instantly, and usu- 
ally for hours on end. 

Far and away the most common cause 
of bad breath is germs. You see, germs 
cause fermentation of proteins, which 
are always present in the mouth. And 
research shoivs that your breath stays 
sweeter longer, the more you reduce germs 
in the mouth. 

No Tooth Paste Kills Odor Germs 
Like This . . . Instantly 

Tooth paste with the aid of a tooth 
brush is an effective method of oral 
hygiene. But no tooth paste gives you 



the proven Listerine Antiseptic 
method — banishing bad breath 
with super-efficient germ-kill- 
ing action. 

Listerine Clinically Proved 
Four Times Better Than Tooth Paste 

Is it any wonder Listerine Antiseptic in 
recent clinical tests averaged at least 
four times more eifective in stopping 
bad breath odors than the chlorophyll 
products or tooth pastes it was tested 
against? With proof like this, it's easy 
to see why Listerine belongs in your 
home. Every morning . . . every night 
. . . before every date, make it a habit 
to use Listerine, the most widely used 
antiseptic in the world. 



LISTERINE ANTISEPTIC STOPS BAD BREATH 

4 times better than any tooth paste 



at ease with 
Mark Evans 




Mornrng coffee with Mark Evans is always fun, takes on^ 
added glomour with top guests such as Grace Kelly. 



Washington s top emcee has made his 
morning show a must for WTOP-TV viewers 




Mark may ad-lib on TV, but Nancy, Wendy and 

Penny like him to follow a nursery-book script. 




QUESTIONS, national and international, took second 
place for two Washingtonians, when The Mark 
Evans Show on Station WTOP-TV switched from 
the early evening hours to a 9:30 A.M. slot, Mon- 
day through Friday. The show's producer and director 
wondered whether the outstanding guests who had 
gladly turned up for a P.M. appearance would be 
amenable to A.M. visits as well. After all, most cele- 
brated people, in show business and other fields, are 
noted for sleeping late. . . . But the question never 
reached investigating -committee proportions. A partial 
list of those who have braved the dawn's early light to 
guest with Mark includes Grace Kelly, Lord Dunsany, 
Alec Templeton, Ivy Baker Priest, Kirk Douglas, George 
Meany and Miss America. . . . When Mark first went on 
TV three years ago, he had a "built-in" audience. After 
five years on WTOP Radio, the easygoing Mr. Evans 
had thousands of friends anxious to see what the host of 
the Hotcsevnves' Protective League looked like. As is 
usually the custom on HPL, the host's identity had not 
been disclosed, but Mark's wit and personality never 
were the sort to remain anonymous for long. ... In ad- 
dition to his famed guests, Mark spotlights many com- 



munity events and is one of the town's most sought-after 
masters of ceremonies. Assisting him with the more fem- 
inine chores on the show is Angela Bayer, a dark-haired 
beauty who demonstrates the food products advertised 
on the program and handles the homemaking and fash- 
ion hints. A yearly feature, the "Mark Evans April Fool 
Birthday Party," started out as a gag. Now it's a tra- 
dition for Mark to invite all Washington folk born on his 
birthday, April 1st, to be his guests for breakfast. This 
year, the number topped the 200 mark. . . . Part of the 
reason for Mark's continued success is his active partici- 
pation in such organizations as the Rotary Club, the Boy 
Scouts, the USO, the Metropolitan Police Boys Club and 
the Suburban Hospital. He is an active member of the 
Church of the Latter Day Saints. ... A favorite with 
Washington women, Mark has a quartet of females at 
home — ^his wife Lola and three daughters: Nancy, 9, 
Penny, 7, and Wendy, 3. He's a great travel enthusiast, 
and bagged more than his share of game on a hunting 
expedition to Africa last year. Huntsman and angler 
Evans also relaxes on the golf course. But he's most re- 
laxed while breakfasting with thousands of WTOP-TV 
viewers who are always at ease with Mark Evans. 



INTRODUCING NEW 




Cutfs ate. Sofht/ 
Eos/erfoSefi 



REGULAR PRICE 89^ 






YOURS ONLY 59^ 



WHILE 
OFFIR HOLDS 



ON GIANT 
IZdZ-SIZE 



We offer this big saving because we know — -once you »ry 
PALMOMVE SOfr SHAMPOO, you'H always use ?t. Tell your 
friends! Hurry! Regular 89^^ price (even that's a borgain) 
comes back when limited Special Offer supply is gone. 



,^?^^^J■^^^^ ^i... >.fJ^y^^WKtW«ij^^j>W^ 



TODAY. ..GET NEW PALMOLIVE SOFT SHAMPOO! 



^ 



• By Jill Warren 



Fibber McGee And Molly — alias Jim and Marian Jordan — have 
added a daily NBC Radio morning show to their evening stanza. 





Songstress Edith Adams, wife of comedion Ernie Ko- 
vacs, adds music and mirth to Jack Poor's new show. 



WHAT'S NEW FROM 



HELEN Hayes and Mary Martin 
have been signed by NBC -TV 
to co-star in "The Skin of Our 
Teeth," on September 11. This will 
be the first of the 1955-56 season's 
Sunday night "Color Spread Spec- 
taculars," and will also be seen in 
black and white. The production of 
Thornton Wilder's Pulitzer Prize- 
winning play will run two hours and 
will be identical to the presentation 
done in Paris this summer as part 
of the "Salute to France" festival. 
Distinguished actress Florence Reed 
and noted Broadway producer 
George Abbott will play supporting 
roles. "The Skin of Our Teeth" will 
mark the first TV appearance of Mary 
Martin since her triumphant por- 
trayal of "Peter Pan" last March. 

In case you've missed it. Musical 
Chairs is the new novelty panel show 
on NBC -TV Saturday nights, in the 
time spot formerly occupied by Imo- 
gene Coca. The program features the 
talents of composer-singer Johnny 
Mercer, multi-voiced comic Mel 
Blanc, Bobby Troup's orchestra, the 
Cheerleaders vocal quintet, Bill 
Leyden as permanent moderator, and 
a top female vocalist each week. 

Frankie Laine, in addition to his 
Guild Films show, has been doing 
very well on his first live network 



TV show as summer replacement for 
Arthur Godfrey's Wednesday night 
show over CBS -TV. Frankie heads 
up a variety hour, complete with 
orchestra, dancers and guest stars. 
Arthur and his gang are slated to 
return early in September. 

Singer-pianist Matt Dennis is fill- 
ing in for both Tony Martin and 
Eddie Fisher on NBC-TV while the 
crooners are on vacation. Matt is 
well-known in the night-club field 
and in addition to his piano and 
vocal work, is a composer of note. 
Some of his best-remembered tunes 
are "Everything Happens to Me," 
"Let's Get Away from It All," "Will 
You Still Be Mine?" and "The Night 
We Called It a Day." Matt also re- 
cords for RCA Victor. 

Comedian Jack Paar has a new 
show on CBS-TV, a thirty-minute 
comedy, music and variety wingding, 
Monday through Friday afternoons. 
Jack is supported by the same cast 
who worked with him on The Morn- 
ing Show — singers Edith Adams and 
Charlie Applewhite and Cuban 
pianist, Jose Melis. Jack's new show 
takes over the time spots vacated by 
two dramatic serials, Ti^e Inner 
Flame and the TV version of The 
Road Of Life. 

On NBC-TV, two other daytime 



dramas. The Greatest Gift and Con- 
cerning Miss Marlowe, make room 
for a new TV version of an old radio 
favorite, It Pays To Be Married. Bill 
Goodwin emcees the unique quiz. 

On radio, the daytime drama 
schedule also saw some changes as 
Backstage Wife moved to CBS and 
Hilltop House and Rosemary were 
canceled. 

Popular Dennis James is back 
with his Chance Of A Lifetime on 
Sunday nights over ABC-TV. The 
half-hour talent show is scheduled 
just for the summer in this time pe- 
riod, but may find a permanent spot 
in the fall. 

Sports fans should find interesting 
viewing fare in the new Madison 
Square Garden Highlights, Thursday 
nights on ABC -TV. It's a filmed half- 
hour presenting clips of exciting mo- 
ments of fisticuflfs which took place 
in the famed boxing arena of the 
Garden. 

CBS-TV has a new dramatic show, 
Windows, on Friday nights, substi- 
tuting for Person To Person. The 
series of live plays uses a rotating 
cast each week, and each program 
opens with a picture of an ordinary 
window, through which the televi- 
sion camera moves as the story un- 
folds. 




On his first New York visit, Frank Cotter — brother of the famous TV 
Meadows sisters — joins sister Audrey ond restaurateur Arnaando. 



Another regular in the vocal department of Poor's 
show is the young and popular Charlie Applewhite. 




I 



Soupy Sales has been replacing 
the Kukla, Fran And Ollie daily show 
on ABC-TV while Burr Tilstrom 
and his happy little people are on 
vacation. Soupy is a very popular 
personality with the small fry in De- 
troit, from where his show originates. 
This is the first TV production ever 
to go live over a network from De- 
troit, by the way. With emphasis on 
puppet comedy and fantasy, Soupy 
has as his helpers such characters as 
White Fang, Black Tooth, Herman 
The Flea, Willie The Worm, and 
Marilyn Monwolf. 

This 'n' That: 

CBS-TV is planning a big series of 
Saturday-night extravaganzas, to be- 
gin this fall, the date still to be an- 
nounced. They have already lined up 
such stars as Noel Coward, who is 
scheduled for three appearances, 
Mary Martin, to co-star with Coward 
in at least one show, Bing Crosby, 
who is slated for three shows, and 
Jack Benny for one or more. 

Radio and TV songstress Martha 
Wright became a bride a few weeks 
ago in Newburgh, New York. The 
lucky man is George (Mike) Man- 
uche, Jr., a Manhattan restaurateur, 
and formerly a Holy Cross football 
star. He was also a Pacific war hero. 



Actress Julie Stevens, star of The 
Romance of Helen Trent, has been 
spending her free time this summer 
acting as adviser and workshop di- 
rector to the very active little-theater 
group in Valhalla, New York. Helen 
Trent, incidentally, has just started 
her twenty-third year on radio. 

With practically every sponsor 
after Bob Hope's exclusive television 
services for the 1955-56 season, NBC- 
TV was the winner. They signed the 
comedian to a new five-year con- 
tract, and he is set to star in six, or 
possibly eight, hour-long variety 
programs on several different Tues- 
day nights. 

Conductor Archie Bleyer and his 
wife, Janet Ertel, one of the Chord- 
ettes, took off for Europe on a com- 
bination vacation-business trip. Gin- 
ny Osborn, the original "tenor" voice 
with the gal quartette, is filling in 
for Janet temporarily, and is singing 
Janet's "bass" part. This is the first 
time Ginny has done any professional 
vocalizing since she married Tom 
Lockhard, one of The Mariners. 

Elizabeth Montgomery, actress- 
daughter of Robert Montgomery, 
and her husband, assistant TV direc- 
tor Frederick Cammann, have come 
to the parting of the ways. Elizabeth 
is now in Nevada, establishing resi- 



dence for a divorce. When it is 
granted she plans to forsake televi- 
sion for a while and work in her first 
movie, some time this month. 

Tragedy hit Imogene Coca a 
double blow when both her mother 
and her husband, Robert Burton, 
died within a month. The little come- 
dienne and Burton had been es- 
tranged, but were reconciled follow- 
ing her mother's passing. Burton, a 
New York businessman, had been in 
ill health for some time. 

Pat Marshall, who formerly sang 
on Steve Allen's Tonight show, and 
then went into night-club work, has 
replaced Janis Paige as the feminine 
star of the Broadway musical smash, 
"Pajama Game." Janis left the show 
to go to Hollywood to film her new 
series, It's Always Jan, which is 
slated to debut on CBS-TV about 
September 10. It's a situation comedy, 
set in a night club, with Janis playing 
the role of a singer. 

If you thought the Davy Crockett 
business had about run its course, 
get ready for more. There's a whole 
new series planned this fall on the 
Disneyland show over ABC-TV, and 
it's presently being fUmed, both in 
Kentucky and in Hollywood. "The 
Legends of Davy Crockett" will soon 
be with us. {Continued on page 10) 





Actress Jean Darling, former "gong" mem- 
ber, enjoys a Clubhouse visit with Joe Bolton. 




Remember them? "Farina" and "Jackie" make a 
very important phone call while, below, "Dickie," 
"Stymie" and "Spanky" take over in the kitchen. 




Stars of yesterday: A scene from "The Little Rascals" shows the gang with 
their mascot Petie, preparing to set forth on a hilarious fishing trip. 

Clubhouse Gang 
Comedies 



SINCE the beginning of television, old Hollywood movies 
have been the bane of that medium's existence. Recently, 
however, Station WPIX viewers have experienced a happy 
change of heart, thanks to Clubhouse Gang Comedies and 
its showing of the "Our Gang" movies made some 25 years 
ago by Hal Roach, Sr. Seen Monday through Saturday at 
5:30 P.M. and Monday through Friday at 10:30 P.M., the 
Clubhouse is presided over by Joe Bolton, who likens himself 
to the friendly police officer on the corner, daily plays host 
to 18 youngsters, advises little viewers on safety habits, then 
presents the old one- and two-reel films which find "Spanky," 
"Farina," "Alfalfa" and the rest of the "Gang" getting into 
all sorts of hilarious but harmless mischief. 

The tremendous success of this series, which is shown in 
some 60 cities throughout the country, has stimulated a new 
interest in the former "Gang" members. Many of them, 
such as Jackie Cooper, Nanette Fabray, Eddie Bracken and 
Jean Darling, have continued to star in movies, on the stage 
in radio and TV. Others ventured into different fields. 
Joe Cobb, the chubby member of the "Gang," is now an 
aircraft worker in California. Mary Kornman is married to a 
California rancher and together they train horses for TV 
and the movies. George "Spanky" MacFarland was a 
salesman until the recent revival of the comedies created a 
demand for him in TV and movies. Carl "Alfalfa" Switzer 
was a hunting guide until two years ago, when he resumed 
his movie career in "The High and the Mighty." 

Although never a member of the "Gang," Joe Bolton well 
remembers its heyday, for he was then breaking into show 
business via radio. Starting out as a banjo player, Joe went 
on to become an announcer, emcee, and sportscaster at 
various stations in New Jersey and New York. His switch to 
TV occurred in 1948 when he joined WPIX — before it even 
began telecasting — to become a "general man about the 
station." As friendly as he is versatile, Joe is experienced in 
getting along with youngsters, for he has three of his own — 
Joe, Jr., a college student, and James and Catherine, who 
are still in high school. 

Since its debut last January, Clubhouse Gang Comedies has 
become the most popular daytime TV offering in the New 
York area. Having gained added fame as "the show 
recommended by children for adults," it promises to provide 
entertainment — ^for young and old — for a long time to come. 




Soft, and natural right from the start . . . that's 
the "Belinda" hairstyle alter a Bobbi. A Bobbi is so 
easv to give, no help is needed. 




With Bobbi you get waves exactl) \^ here you 
want them, the way you want them. Notice the 
easy, gentle look of this "Beau's Ideal" hairdo. 




Bobbi is specially designed to give the sottiy feminine wave necessary for this 
new "Sugarplum" hairstyle. No regular nightly settings are needed. 



Softly feminine liairstyies like these 
always begin with a Bobbi 

the special pin-curl permanent for soft, natural curls 

Never tight, never fussy — that's the beautiful thing about a Bobbi, 
the easy, pin-curl permanent that's specially designed to give softly 
feminine curls. From the very first day your Bobbi will have the body, 
the soft, lovely look of naturally wavy hair. Your curls and waves 
last week after week and they are exactly where you want them. 

Now, Bobbi is easier, faster than ever. Pin-curl your hair, apply 
Special Bobbi Creme Oil Lotion just once. Rinse with water 15 
minutes later. Let dry, brush out. Right away you'll have soft, 
natural flzttering curls. Make your next permanent a Bobbi. 



Netv 20-Page Hairstyle Booklet. Easy-to-follow setting instructions for 
new softly feminine hairstyles. Hints! Tips! Send your name, address 
with 100 in coin to: Bobbi, Box 3600, Merchandise Mart, Chicago, III. 




Bobbi's specialty is young, free and easy hairstyles 

like this "Cover Girl" hairdo. And the curl is there Just pin-curls and Bobbi. No separate neutralizer, no curlers, no resetting. Every- 

to stay in all kinds of weather. thing you need— New Creme Oil Lotion, special Bobbi pins. $1.50 plus tax. 




WHAT'S NEW FROM 

(Continued from page 7) 



10 



with CARL BENTON REID • NATALIE WOOD -WILLIAM HOPPER 

by JERRY HOPPER • Scteenplay by LAWRENCE ROMAN and ROBERT BLEES • Produced by ROSS HUNTER 



COMING SOON TO YOUR FAVORITE THEATRE 




Directed 



Lively Janis Paige stars in a new 
TV comedy beginning in September. 



Another historical figure, Dan'I Boone, 

whose supporters claim he was blazing 
trails long before a lot of other "Johnny- 
come-latelies," now speaks his piece on 
a daily five-minute program over NBC 
Radio. Nobody's telling who's playing 
Dan'I, but the yarns and folk songs are 
accompanied by Tom Glazer on guitar. 

And, from Sherwood Forest, to once 
again champion the poor, comes the hand- 
somest of Robin Hoods, Richard Greene, 
who will play the romantic bandit in a 
new CBS-TV series starting September 
26. The films will be made in England, 
produced by Anthony Bartley, who is 
married to actress Deborah Kerr. 

And speaking of legends, the Crosby 
clan is fast becoming one, with more tal- 
ented members popping up all the time. 
This summer, Cathy Crosby, Bob's six- 
teen-year-old daughter, joined her cousin 
Gary, "Bing's Boy," to guest on the Boh 
Crosby Show on CBS-TV. Cathy is the 
latest Crosby to have a CBS contract. 

Perry Como hopes to give Jackie Glea- 
son a run for his $11,000,000 contract. The 
new hour-long Como show, Saturdays on 
NBC-TV, has now been scheduled to start 
at 8 P.M. EDT. Jackie bows with "The 
Honeymooners" over CBS-TV at 8: 30. 
At 8:25, Old Per plans to start a ten- 
minute segment that will be so absorbing 
that viewers will keep hands off. that dial 
— he hopes. 

Comedienne Martha Raye signed a 
Gleason-type contract with NBC. It's a 
60-page document involving something 
like $10,000,000 over a fifteen-year period. 
It goes into effect September 27 when 
Martha will make the first of thirteen ap- 
pearances in the Tuesday-at-eight spot 
The contract, negotiated by Martha's 
manager and ex-husband, Nick Condos 
calls for NBC to pay Martha even if she 
decides to quit after the first five years 
of service. 

The piano gives off with a pleasant 
sound when Steve Allen tickles th(^ 
ivories on Tonight. But as star of the 
movie, "The Benny Goodman Story," 
Steve will signal for the downbeat and 
the music will be made by such Goodman 
alumni as Gene Krupa, Teddy Wilson 
Lionel Hampton, Harry James and Ziggy 
Elman. All told, there'll be 29 tunes thai 
have been linked with B. G. during his 
career. 



i 



COAST TO COAST 





Young Dr. Malone — Sandy Becker 
— also emcees TV's Looiiev Tunes. 



Jack Webb also leads a jazz band for 

■ the movie cameras in "Pete Kelly's 
Blues," a film that recreates the Twenties 

'i, with such nostalgic notes as glimpses of 

■ the Duke of Windsor. 

' One of the oldest programs on TV, 
^ "Smilin" Ed's Gang," returns August 20. 

Andy Devine will take over for the late, 
'■ beloved Ed McConnell, with the show to 

be known as Andy's Gang. 
Andy's partner on Wild Bill Hickok, 
' Guy Madison, who plays the title role, 

• ' welcomed a future Wild Bill fan, his new 

• daughter, Bridget Catherine. 



Mulling The Mail: 

Mrs. L. v., Philadelphia, Pa.: Joan Al- 
exander will be back on The Navie's The 
Same shortly. She only took a leave of 
absence from the program in order to re- 
place Patricia Jessel in the Broadway 
dramatic hit, "Witness for the Prosecu- 
tion," while Patricia vacationed in Eng- 
land. . . . Marlowe fans, Romulus, Mich.: 
Marian Marlowe has no regular television 
show now, but the ex-Little Godfrey has 
signed to make several guest appearances 
with Ed Sullivan on Toast Of The Town. 
There is a possibility she will be making 
a night-club appearance in Detroit later 
on this year. . . . Mrs. J. B., Boston, Mass.: 
The Road Of Life has gone off television, 
but it is still on radio. . . . Mr. A. McL., 
San Antonio, Tex.: You are right, and 
your friend loses the bet. Betty Johnson, 
the song girl on Don McNeill's Breakfast 
Club, did get her professional start with 
her talented family, well-known for years 
in radio and on records as the Johnson 
Family Singers. . . . Miss D. B., Gatesville, 
Tex.: Gisele MacKenzie is not married 

nor engaged Mrs. G. R., Cleveland, O.: 

The part of Mrs. Brown on This Is Nora 
Drake is played by Katherine Emmett, 
noted New York stage actress. . . . Mr. 
C. L., Omaha, Neb.: Singer Denise Lor 
is married. Her husband's name is Jay 
Martin, and he is also a singer, who 
records under the name of Brud Jones. 
. . . Miss H. S., Cupertino, Calif.: The 
best place to write Ina Rae Hutton re- 
garding her all-girl orchestra would be 
c/o Guild Films, Hollywood, California. 
. . . Mrs. M. B., Massillon, Ohio: Sandy 
Becker, who has played Young Doctor 
Malone for many years on radio, has 
{Continued on page 18) 



What I M 
may shock 
you. ..but ^ 

a woman has 
the right to . 
use every ' * * 
female weapon 
to hold the man 
she loves" I 




l0u'0€lMf£\QfiteA^M/ioria£p'tei»nl4 



JOSE 



JUNE 

ALLYSON 





EVERY SHOCKING EMOTION Of 
THE Gi.lM PUUTZER PRIZE PLAY! 



with JOY PAGE • KENDALL CLARK • ISABEL BONNER 

Directed by JOSE FERRER • Screenplay by KETTl FRINGS 

Based on Hie play by JOSEPH KRAMM ■ Produced by AARON ROSENBERG 



COMING SOON TO YOUR FAVORITE THEATRE 



1] 




STEVE ALLEN'S 
TURNTABLE 



GREETINGS from Hollywood again, where 
I'm in the middle of shooting "The 
Benny Goodman Story" and am enjoying 
every minute of it. I've got my turntable 
right in my dressing room, and between 
scenes the latest record releases have been 
going 'round and 'round. Lots of variety 
this month, which makes for good sum- 
mertime listening. 

Johnnie Ray has two new sides, either 
one of which could be another click for 
him. The first is a pretty ballad, "Song of 
the Dreamer," and the second, an oddly- 
titled song, "I've Got So Many Million 
Years" (That I Can't Count Them). (Col- 
umbia) 

David Rose and his orchestra play 
"Simamertime in Venice" and "Violin" 
(Let Your Song Begin), with full Rose 
arrangements featuring the string instru- 
ments, in his usual tasteful style. The A 
side is the haunting theme of the new 
Katharine Hepburn picture, "Stunmer- 
time," and it's a melody you'll probably 
be hearing for months to come. (M-G-M) 

"Summertime in Venice" is also Jane 
Froman's newest record, and a mighty 
good one it is. Jane is in great voice and 
her lyric interpretation is excellent. On the 
reverse she does "You're the Answer to 
My Prayer," a new ballad. Sid Feller's 
orchestra accompanies on both. (Capitol) 

The Sauter-Finnegan orchestra has a 
new jazz album called, "The Sons of 
Sauter-Finnegan," and it really rings the 
bell. There are several standards and some 
interesting originals, especially "Two Bats 
in a Cave," as done by trumpeters Nick 
Travis and Bobby Nichols. The boys do 
this in fugue style with no orchestral back- 
ing, and the jazz fans should love it. 
(Victor) 

Decca has teamed up one of their top 
platter salesmen, Sammy Davis, Jr., with 
Carmen McRae — a singing gal from whom 
Decca expects big things — and the result 
is a pleasing record. Carmen and Sammy 
blend their voices on a cute tune, "I Go 
for You," and revive the oldie, "A Fine 
Romance," which Decca originally re- 
leased many years ago with Bing Crosby 
and his late wife, Dixie Lee. 

Jackie Gleason has had another musical 
brainstorm, and this time he has come up 
with an album called "Captain Gleason's 
Garden Band." Jack takes you right out 
to the park for an afternoon band con- 
cert, complete with tubas and French 
horns, etc. Jackie previewed two of the 
J songs from the album on his TV show a 
y few weeks ago — "In the Good Old Sum- 
P mertime" and "The Band Played On." The 
other two are "In the Shade of the Old 
Apple Tree," and "Too Much Mustard." 

12 



Wonder what the Wonder Man will think 
up for his next albtim. (Capitol) 

The lass with the financial name, Jaye 
P. Morgan, is moving right along in her 
vocal career, and her new record shouldn't 
slow her pace a bit. Jaye sings the ever- 
lovin' "Swanee," in up tempo, coupled 
with a slow ballad, "The Longest Walk." 
Hugo Winterhalter conducts. (Victor) 

"Fred Astaire's Cavalcade of Dance" is 
the title of an album by Paul Whiteman 
and his "new" Palais Royale Orchestra. 
There are twelve dance numbers, all quite 
right for just about any heel-and-toe stuff 
you might want to do. Included are waltz- 
es, tangos, fox trots, etc., with the tunes 
ranging all the way from "Beer Barrel 
Polka" to "The Black Bottom." There are 
a few vocal choruses by the "New" Rhythm 
Boys. (Coral) 

You've probably heard several versions 
of the novelty, "Freddy," but now you can 
hear the original record that started the 
whole thing. "X" Label has acquired the 
first waxing of the tune, which was done 
in Europe by a girl named Annie Cordy. 
She sings the lyrics in German on one side 
and in English on the other. 

Something new for hillbilly-music lovers 
has been put out by the Four-Star Re- 
cording Company. It's titled "The Trail- 
ways Blues" and features vocalist Bill 
Taylor, backed up by the Miller Brothers 
aggregation. Pretty neat. 

Lena Home, with hubby Lenny Hay- 
ton's orchestra, has a terrific side in "It's 
All Right with Me," one of the hit tunes 
from die long-running Broadway musical, 
"Can Can." In the show the song is done 
as a ballad, but Lena sings it very fast, 
and it's all right too. For the coupling she 
slows down on "It's Love," a pretty bal- 
lad from another Broadway hit of a few 
seasons ago, "Wonderful Town." This rec- 
ord could be a winner for Lena follow- 
ing closely after her popular "Love Me 
or Leave Me." (Victor) 

"Boy Meets Girl" is a new Columbia 
album, with a new idea behind it. It 
triple-stars Peggy King, Felicia Sanders 
and Jerry Vale, with the threesome sing- 
ing a love story. The tale unravels through 
the songs, beginning with "The Boy Next 
Door," and ending, about ten numbers 
later, with — you guessed it — a happy end- 
ing. Percy Faith conducts the orchestra. 

Peggy Lee bounces forth with a new 
novelty called "Oh! No!" a musical para- 
phrase on the popular expression, backed 
up with the familiar "Ooh, That Kiss," 
and ooh, that arrangement — something 
different, for sure. The orchestra plays it 
in a cha-cha-cha tempo. (Decca) 

Woody Herman and his orchestra have 



recorded two songs from recent movies, 
and the treatment of both is rather un- 
usual for Woody. One tune is "You're ' 
Here, My Love," from "The Seven Little 
Foys," and the other is "The Girl Up- 
stairs," from "The Seven Year Itch," the 
melody which is played every time Mari- 
lyn Monroe comes on the screen, so it 
won't be hard to remember. Woody has 
used interesting arrangements on both 
sides, featxiring the harp and a vocal 
chorus. (Capitol) 

"Just Too Much" is a new album by 
the Hal Schaefer Trio, and it's quite a bit 
at that. Schaefer, in his early twenties, is 
the lad who has been creating quite a 
splash in West Coast spots with his jazz 
piano style. On this set, Hal's trio (Alvin 
Stoller on drums and Joe Mondragon on 
bass fiddle) play a group of standards, and 
two Schaefer originals, "Yes" and "Mon- 
tevideo." (Victor) 

The banjo, an almost- forgotten instru- 
ment, has come back into the spotlight this 
past year, and, now they've whipped up a 
ttine about it called, "The Banjo's Back in 
Town," and Teresa Brewer belts across 
in her usual sock style. On the backing 
Teresa tells all about "How To Be Very, 
Very Popular," which is also the title of 
the new 20th Century-Fox movie, starring 
Betty Grable and Sheree North. (Coral) 

And that about wraps it up for now, 
as they say on the film sets. I'll be seeing 
you again next month. 




Jane Froman renders a lilting version 
of "Summertime in Venice." (Capitol) 



For the Easiest Permanent 
of Your Life . . . 




:£^ 





►casual 



PIN-CURL 
PERMANENT, 





SET IT / 



Set your pin-curls just as you always do 
_^ No need for anyone to help, 









WET IT/ 



Apply CASUAL lotion just once . 
15 minutes later, rinse with clear water. 



FORGET IT.' 



That's all there is to it I CASUAL is 

self-neutralizing. There's no resetting. 

Your work is finished! 



Naturally lovely, carefree curls 

that last for weeks . . . 

Casual is the word for it . . . soft, carefree waves 

and curls -never tight or kinky— beautifully manageable, 

perfect for the new flattering hair styles that highlight the softer, 

natural look. Tonight — give yourself the loveliest wave 

of your life— a Casual pin-curl permanent! 

tak^s just 15 minutes more than setting your hair! 

$1.50 PIUS TAX 




13 



Ted Steele holds WOR-TVers 
young and old in the 
palm of his talented hands 
as he daily delights them 
on two merry shows 




Ted's shows always "jump." Here, he and Cozy Cole are on drums, with 

Johnny Chavez, guitar, Bobby Caudano, accordion, Tonnmy Abruzzo, bass. 



T 
V 
R 

14 




WITH two wonderful TV shows of 
their own, an equal number of 
daughters — also wonderful — and a 
Bucks County, Pennsylvania, farm 
that can be similarly described, Ted 
Steele and his wife and producer, 
Doris, are often told they're lucky. 
To this, Ted and Doris smile at each 
other with affection and long-time 
understanding. Then Ted says, "Yep, 
the harder we work, the luckier we 
get." 

Currently, it's Station WOR-TV 
viewers who consider themselves 
lucky. Weekday afternoons, from 3 
to 5, there's the Ted Steele Show, a 
program of music and variety star- 
ring Ted, Ceil Loman and her Wo- 
man's Corner, drummer Cozy Cole 
and sax man johnny Hodges heading 
up an aggregation called the "Oblong 
Squares," and Corky Robbins, her 
piano and songs. The whole gang pre- 
sents music, charades and other 
games, and discusses questions sent in 
by viewers — all making for a spright- 
ly two hours of fun for the whole 
family. 

Following this, Ted's Teen Band- 
stand stars the teenagers of the 
Greater New York area. Every day, 
a group of 30 youngsters from a 
school or organization dance to the 
music of Steve Schultz and his Dixie- 
landers, meet and talk to musical 
stars, compete in contests and games. 
Pretty Jeanne O'Brien presides over 
her Gossip Board of initialed mystery 
items culled from 3,000 letters a week 
and leads the talk on teen fads and 





Teener Ann Marie Sisko gets a prize from Ted and 
Jeanne O'Brien for giving the Bandstand its name. 



Partners in marriage and work, Ted the performer 
and Doris the producer check their show schedule. 





No "gentleman farmer," Ted is an expert on his 
pure-bred cattle, wades right into the farm work. 



Doris, Susan and Sally love the pets — 30 cats, 2 
dogs, outdoor aviary — that come with farm life. 



the most up-to-date fashions. 

Ted, whose own daughters — Susan, 
13, and Sally, 12 — are his off-camera 
leading lights, takes especial pleasure 
in giving the teenagers a show of their 
own, incorporating their letters and 
ideas and their requests for tunes and 
guest stars. He feels youngsters can 
use the games and gimmicks pre- 
sented on Bandstand for at-home 
parties and that the program can 
show parents what kind of entertain- 
ment teenagers enjoy. 

Ted Steele is serious about having 
worked hard. As a Trinity College 
student, he divided his time between 
the Hartford, Connecticut, campus, 
trips to Manhattan for radio auditions, 
and the theater-night club circuit 
around Hartford where he earned his 
tuition and upkeep. His first big 



break came when Ted quit an an- 
nouncing job in Hollywood to fly to 
New York and take on a $65-a-month 
chore as a page boy. 

His musical background quickly 
made Ted a salesman for a radio 
recording library. While selling, he 
learned to play the then-new Nova- 
chord, then organized the "Nova- 
tones," which became a favorite disc 
group. Next Ted switched to arrang- 
ing and conducting scores for such 
top talent as Perry Como, Connie 
Boswell, Jo Stafford and Frank 
Sinatra. 

But, in 1947, Ted again began front- 
ing his own orchestra at hotels and 
night spots and doing radio and TV 
work. Today, in addition to his WOR- 
TV shows, he presents the Ted Steele 
Show over the Mutual Radio network, 



Monday through Friday at 1:30 P.M. 

The Steeles commute to the New 
York studios from their Celebrity 
Farm, 100 acres stocked with pure- 
bred Guernseys and 400 acres which 
Ted rents for growing feed and other 
crops. Ted defers to Doris' profes- 
sional advice, but at home he's very 
much the head of the house. "We are 
really interdependent," Doris says, 
cherishing the closeness that comes 
with being partners in marriage and 
in career. 

When the Steeles first bought their 
farm, they moved in with one lamp, 
some borrowed beds and a framed 
motto: "You can do anything you 
want to do." Ted Steele has proved 
the truth of this motto to cheers and 
applause from WOR-TV viewers of 
all ages. 



T 
V 
R 

15 



NEW DESIGNS FOR LIVING 



16 





7391 



589 — Lovely, lacy pineapple design forms 
this unusual "butterfly" set to pretty and 
protect your chairs. Easy-to-memorize 
crochet. Use as a buffet set, too. 25^ 

7344 — Doll-making is easy with these iron- 
on faces in color. Pattern pieces for 15- 
inch dolls and clothes. Also included are 
iron-on color transfers of faces for two 
dolls and motifs for pockets. 25^ 



Iron-On Flowers 




7316 



525 — ^Ideal for school, pretty for parties. 
Make two versions — one with and one with- 
out sleeves. Frost the edges with eyelet 
trim. Child's Sizes 2, 4, 6, 8, 10. Tissue pat- 
tern, transfer, instructions. State size, 25^ 

7316 — Easy-sew apron takes one yard 35- 
inch fabric. No embroidery — iron-on red 
petunias with green leaves. Tissue pattern, 
washable transfer. Medium Size only. 25^ 

7204 — The pride of every state — its own 
lovely flower — embroidered on this cozy 
quilt. Diagrams, transfers of embroidery 
motifs included. Quilt 72" x 102", double- 
bed size. Each square, 7" x 8". 25^ 

7391 — Crochet this cover for any size 
TV set — in your favorite spider design. 
TV cover, 28" in No. 30 cotton; smaller 
in No. 50; larger in mercerized bedspread 
cotton. Join 4 to make a 56-inch cloth. 25^ 

767 — Let this little lady perch atop your 
toaster — keep it soil-free. Her long, full 
skirt is its protective cover. Pattern pieces, 
instructions, transfer of embroidery. Use 
scraps, stuff with foam rubber. 25^ 





cr^ 




Send twenty-five cents (in coins) for 
New York 11, N. Y. Add five cents 



each pattern to: TV Radio Mirror, Needlecraft Service, P.O. Box 137, Old Chelsea Station, 
for each pattern for first-class mailing. Send an additional 25^ for Needlecraft Catalog. 



For the sound of dreams come true . . . 
set your dial each week for PHONORAMA TIME 
J the song-hit show for the young at heart . . . 
starring the idol of millions 



JOHNISY DESMOND 



aturdays at 11:30 EDT 



MUTUAL 




See local listings for program time in your area. 



17 



Whafs New 

in Colgate Dental 

Cream that's 

MISSING- 
MISSING- 

MISSING 

in every other 
leading toothpaste? 



18 



t^i 



An y toothpaste can destroy decay- and 
odor-causing bacteria. But new bac- 
teria return in minutes, forming acids 
that cause decay. Colgate's, unlike any 
other leading toothpaste,' keeps on 
fighting decay 12 hours or more! 

So, morning brushings with Colgate's 
help protect all day; evening brushings 
all night. Gardol in Colgate's forms an 
invisible, protective shield around teeth 
that lasts 1 2 hours with just one brushing. 
Ask your dentist how often to brush 
your teeth. Encourage your children 
to brush after meals. And at all times, 
get Gardol protection in Colgate's! 




•TMC lEADINO TOOTHPA8XE5 
ACCOUNT f^OB OVER 
705i or ALL TOOTHPASTES 
80L0 TOOAYI 



No other leading toothpaste 
can give the 12 -hour protection 
against decay you get with 
Colgate's with Gardol 



CLEANS YOUR BREATH 
it GUARDS YOUR TEETH 



WHArS NEW FROM COAST TO COAST 

{Continued from page 11) 



recently taken over the emcee role on 
the Looney Tunes TV show over the 
Du Mont Network. . . . Miss E. K., Port- 
land, Ore.: Bing Crosby was originally 
mentioned for the television production 
of "Our Town," which has been adapted 
as a musical, but Frank Sinatra is now 
set to do it in September on NBC-TV. 

What Ever Happened To ... ? 

Cliff Edwards, the singing comedian 
known as Ukulele Ike? Cliff's career 
hasn't been zooming too much in the past 
few years, but now, thanks to his re- 
cording of "When You Wish Upon a 
Star," things are looking up for him. 
Cliff made the record back in 1949 when 
he did the voice of Jiminy Cricket in 
Walt Disney's film, "Pinocchio." Disney 
used the record as the theme song for his 
Disneyland TV series, and now Cliff will 
again work for Disney on the forthcom- 
ing Mickey Mouse Cluh daily TV kiddie 
show. He's also set to record some new 
tunes shortly. 

Kenny Delmar (Senator Claghorn), 
who resumed his radio career a while 
back in the rurming part of Buck Halli- 
day in The Second Mrs. Burton? Kenny 
has left New York, and the program, to 
return to live in Hollywood. Howard 
Smith, Broadway actor now appearing in 
the stage show, "Anniversary Waltz," has 
replaced Delmar as Buck. 

Don Herbert, creator and star of the 
Mr. Wizard program, seen over NBC-TV? 
Herbert was taken ill a few weeks ago 
and his condition was diagnosed as acute 
and chronic exhaustion. He was taken to 
the Augustana Hospital in Chicago, where 
he is improving. Pending Don's return 
to work, kinescope telecasts will be sub- 
stituted for his Saturday program. 

Molly Berg, who wrote and starred in 
the heart-warming adventures of The 
Goldbergs? Molly is filming a new series 
of Goldberg stories for Guild Films — and 
just to keep up with the trend throughout 




Kathy Godfrey presents the bright 
side of the news, Sundays on CBS. 



the country, the family is moving to the 
suburbs. The series will probably start 
sometime this fall. 



If you have a question about one of 
your favorite people or programs, or won- 
der what has happened to someone on 
radio or television, drop me a line — Miss 
Jill Warren, TV Radio Mirror, 205 E. 
42nd St., New York 17, N. Y., and I'll 
try my best to find out for you and put 
the information in this column. Unfortu^ 
nately, we don't have space to answer all 
questions, so I try to cover those person- 
alities and shows about whom I receive 
the most inquiries. Sorry, no personal 
answers, so kindly do not enclose stamped 
envelopes or postage, as they cannot be 
returned. 




Jack Benny and his wife Mary Livingstone, on a New York holiday, visit the 
Stork Club. Jack's slated to appear on a CBS-TV "spectacular" this fall. 




You get floods more suds. .. better hair-conditloning too! 






10 







of^- 




NEW 



0/fk^^/^ 



You'll he talking about lather for 
days after your first shampoo with 
new White Rain. Because it really 
does pile up astonishingly . . . gives 
you gobs more rich, gentle suds, soft 
as rain water. You can feel your hair 
become silken under your finger-tips 



. . . Yet see" what happens when you 
comb it out. The curl just naturally 
springs back. New White Rain 
leaves your hair in better condition, 
sprinkled with sunshine, fresh as a 
breeze, and manageable. New White 
Rain was made especially for you . . . 



^ '*' lOffJU THE PEOPLE WHO KNOW YOUR HAIR BEST 



T 
V 
R 

19 



Qkw^^^'Vi^ 



ALL. DAY. 



ALU OVER 





Wanderful 

Dj'a-nlss 

TALCUM 

It gives your skin 
a thrilling satin 
softness ... an alluring 
feminine fragrance. 
This finest of imported 
talcs- soothes, cools 
and perfumes every £; 
inch of you! Absorbs *| 
perspiration— helps \ 

prevent chafing . . . 
keeps you delightful 
to be near! 





Dreais «oie true... 



when you wear BLUE WALTZ. 
This intoxicating perfume is 
not for the timid. 
Try it — when you're 

ready for love! 



20 




Daytime Diary 



^luitmmaiivgift^etimail^ 



#3 {aMiJSnwSSS^ 



•MMMMMMMaaiaMMt 




All programs are heard Monday through Friday; consult 
local papers for time and statipn. 




BACKSTAGE WIFE Mary Noble has 
had years of practice at being the wife of 
a famous Broadway star, but every now 
and then even she faces a problem that it 
seems must wreck her marriage. Although 
she is certain that Larry is fundamentally 
devoted to her and their family, his bril- 
liant, fascinating leading women can often 
manage to distress her far more than she 
likes to admit. Will Larry's career end by 
coming between him and Mary? CBS 
Radio. 

THE BRIGHTER BAY If architect Don 
Harrick really works on plans for the 
Youth Center, all' Reverend Dennis' hopes 
for it will be brilliantly realized. But per- 
sonal difficulties beset Harrick as he sees 
his hold on his sister-in-law, Lydia, 
weakening under the warmth of her 
friendship with editor Max Canfield. Will 
Harrick use the one weapon that can 
really ruin Lydia's life in order to main- 
tain his influence over her? CBS-TV and 
CBS Radio. 

TUE BOCTOR'S WIFE Embittered by 
the publicity that misrepresents her as- 
sociation with the children's convalescent 
home, Julie Palmer vows to keep hands 
off all public activities, and withdraws so 
decidedly that her husband, Dr. Dan 
Palmer, is really concerned over an atti- 
tude he has never seen in Julie before. 
But a brave child reminds Julie that with- 
out courage life is much less worth liv- 
ing. NBC Radio. 

FIRST LOVE The harrowing days of 
Zach's trial for the murder of Petey are 
bound to leave their mark on Laurie no 
matter what the verdict. StruggUng not to 
show the terrible strain, she wonders if 
Zach can do the same — Zach who is so 
much more emotional and keyed-up than 
the average man. How will he feel about 
David Abbott, knowing that the clever 
young lawyer's fight to save him was more 
for Laurie's sake than for his? NBC-TV. 



THE CL'IDIiVC LIGHT Long after her 
marriage to Dick was over, Kathy realized 
how much she still loved him. But even if 
he returns to California the chances are 
small that their lives can ever join again, 
for Dick is no longer the confused, weak 
man he was a few years ago. Meanwhile, 
Kathy's friend Bertha faces a trying time 
as her newly-widowed mother comes 
home with her. What will this mean to 
her husband and her older son? CBS-TV 
and CBS Radio. 

HAWKINS FALLS Nobody who really 
knows a small town — knows it as Lona 
and Dr. Floyd Corey do — will ever make 
the mistake of thinking that life there is 
as quiet and peaceful as it appears to the 
casual passerby. But even Lona is sur- 
prised when she suddenly learns that her 
name has been forged — and finds out who 
did it. This, she thinks, is certainly the 
strangest thing that will ever happen in 
Hawkins Falls. But is she wrong? NBC- 
TV. 

JOYCE J ORB AN, M.B The respected 
position Joyce has built for herself, both 
as a woman and a doctor, is threatened 
by the curious persecution of her own 
young sister, Kitty, who seems determined 
to destroy Joyce's hopes for a future with 
socially prominent lawyer Mike Hill. Has 
Kitty, through the man called James Duf- 
fy, stumbled upon a chain of events that 
may really help her to accomplish her 
purpose? NBC-TV. 

JUST PLAIN BILL The beautiful young 
actress, Arline Wilton, has created quite a 
stir in Hartville. Bill watches with con- 
cern as Peter Dyke Hampton, the suc- 
cessful lawyer who recently seemed at- 
tracted to Bill's daughter Nancy, finds 
himself succumbing to Arline's undeniable 
fascination. What is there about Arline 
that leads Bill to fear that Peter's feeling 
for her will eventually lead to trouble? 
NBC Radio. 



I 



>KE.VZO JO.VES When Belle Jones' 
long search for Lorenzo was successful, 
she was so elated that she had small doubt 
that the future would see complete happi- 
ness restored with the recovery of Loren- 
zo's memory, so that they could resume 
the contented marriage that was disrupted 
by his accident. But now, months later, she 
faces heartbreak as Lorenzo still cannot 
recall the past. Will she be forced, to turn 
to Denis Scott and his love to salvage her 
own future? NBC Radio. 

LOVE OF LIFE Van's recovery from-her 
miscarriage, and Paul's final courageous 
honesty with his former wife, Judith, has 
to some extent drawn Judith's fangs and 
cleared the way for a better future for 
his marriage to Van. But there still re- 
mains Judith's child— the child so deeply 
damaged by Judith's callousness. If Van 
follows the fugitive thought that has 
crossed her mind, will it be the greatest 
mistake of her life? CBS-TV. 

Jli.4 PEKKf.VS Gladys was the spoiled 
child of a wealthy family, and Joe was the 
modest, unforceful adopted son of Ma 
Perkins, when the two fell in love and 
were married. But, despite the difference 
in background, they were extremely hap- 
py until the tragic disappearance of their 
baby put torturing strain on both of them. 
Will bitterness transform Gladys back into 
the cold, superficial girl she once ap- 
peared to be? Can Ma save their mar- 
riage? CBS Radio. 

Of « GAL SIX DAY Leslie Northurst's 
attempt to destroy Lord Henry's hold on 
the Brinthrope title and estates brought 
ruin only to Leslie himself. And yet Sun- 
day wonders if she and her husband can 
ever really forget Leslie's attack. Is she 
right in fearing that it created havoc in 
her marriage that can never be com- 
pletely repaired? Or is there a crisis 
ahead that will relegate all thoughts of 
Leslie to the background? CBS Radio. 

PEPPER VOf .VC'S FAMILY No mat- 
ter how much two young people love each 
other, they cannot be separated for any 
length of time without becoming lonely 
enough to seek companionship elsewhere. 
Carter's long, harrowing disappearance has 
thrown Peggy back on the friendship of 
two very willing young men. And, in New 
York, Carter embarks on a strange new 
life with the help of a friendly young 
singer and his own talent for playing the 
piano. NBC Radio. 

PERRY 3tASO\ The careful, compli- 
cated plan to get hold of Sam Merri- 
weather's wealth approaches success as 
the girl posing as his daughter tightens 
the trap around his real daughter, known 
to him as his secretary, Lois Monahan. 
Can Perry xmearth the confused frame- 
work of the truth in time to save Sam — 
and save Lois from a framed murder 
charge? Or, working in the dark as he 
must, will it be only Lois he can save? 
CBS Radio. 

THE RIGHT TO HAPPINESS The 

accident in which Carolyn is injured helps 
to bring to a sort of climax the strained 
situation between her and her husband. 
Miles Nelson. Does Miles' political career 
really suffer from his marriage, as wily 
Annette Thorpe has tried to convince him? 
More important, has Miles himself begim 
to suspect that he could go faster and 
farther alone — or with Annette as a part- 
ner? NBC Radio. (Continued on page 97) 




mmdenform ora 

As a matter of course, you'll choose Ariette*, the new Maidenform elastic bra 
that sets you hee I Airy-light elastic outlining the broadcloth 
curve-flattering cups to snug the bra to you; elastic under the cups 
to move with every breath you take,- elastic back-panels 'I 

to give you more freedom of motion than you ever dreamed of in a bra. 
Ariette g-i-v-e-s with your every move — 
follows your figure like a dream ! 2.50 A, B and C cups. 



• REG. U. S. PAT. OFF. 



I BRASSIERE CO., N. Y. 16 SK 



r BY PREMIER 



JEWELRY BY STEINEN 



21 



\. 'lit 



22 




n 



coolest 
thing you 
can wear 

There isn't any other kind of sanitary pro- 
tection that's nearly as cool as Tampax*. 
In fact, millions of women first adopted 
Tampax in the Summertime — when they 
simply couldn't stand hot, uncomfort- 
able external pads a minute longer! 

Why put up with chafing . . . irrita- 
tion . . . odor problems and disposal prob- 
lems . . . when Tampax is as 
handy as your nearest drug or 
notion counter? It gives the 
wearer such a remarkable sense 
of freedom that many users say 
they almost forget it's "time-of-the- 
month" for them. Certainly, you feel 
much more poised, much more relaxed, 
with protection that's both invisible and 
unfelt when in place. You can be your 
dainty, fastidious self at all times! 

It goes without saying that you can 
swim while wearing Tampax, that you 
don't need to remove it while taking 
your shower or tub. This doctor-invented 
product must be the nicest way of han- 
dling the trying days of the month — 
so many women say so! Buy Tampax 
now in your choice of 3 absorbencies: 
Regular, Super, Junior. Month's supply 
goes into purse. Tampax Incorporated, 
Palmer, Mass. 

•Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



■ 




Invented by a doctor — 
"kow used by millions of women 



information 



The Winner! 

You are right, when you state your 
reason for printing the Feather Your Nest 
contest winners' names first, before notify- 
ing them . . . it was a greater thrill. I gaze 
and stare at my name . . . and say, "It 
can't be!" But, thar tiz! To think of my 
name being all over the U. S. A. makes 
me feel like a celebrity . . . which of 
course I am, in a way, because the judges 
picked my "whacky" entry for first prize. 

I can hardly wait to get my living room 
set . . . and am so afraid it might arrive 
when I'm out. Also, I wish to clear the 
room of old pieces, before the beautiful 
new ones "swagger" in and scoff at my 
poor "antee-ques." The old ones were very 
faithful, though battle-scarred, and might 
feel sensitive if they glimpsed the new- 
comers. 

Lots of good wishes to you and your 
fine, enjoyable magazine. I surely did 
enjoy the contest, but never expected to 
win a prize, let alone the top one. Every- 
one is complimenting my family on my 
big win. My son, who is in the Army, can 
scarcely wait to see our lovely living 
room. Its being modern tickles him so 
much, as it does all of us. 

I wonder if being a "Bird" had anything 
to do with winning this Feather Your 
Nest prize? Anyway, we think it is quite 
a coincidence. 

Bertha L. Bird, 
Needham Heights, Mass. 

Out of His Teens 

/ would like to know about James 
Lydon, who plays Andy Boone on NBC- 
TV's So This Is Hollywood. Where can 
I write to him? C.R., Chicago, III. 

"For eighteen years I've played a high 
school teenager, and that's long enough 
for any man," asserts Jimmy Lydon, who's 
happy to have graduated to the role of 
actors' agent in So This Is Hollywood. . . . 





James Lydon 



Rin Tin Tin IV 



Born James Joseph Lydon on May 30, 
1923, in Harrington Park, New Jersey, his 
long-lived teen-age career began when he 
was studying photography at the Profes- 
sional Children's School in New York 
City. Jimmy's father was a railroad statis- 
tician and several of his nine children 
became interested in acting. Jimmy's start 
came when his freckles attracted atten- 
tion among commercial photographers 
and he moved to the other side of the 
camera to become a model. He appeared in 
several Broadway plays, then went to 
Hollywood to play juvenile roles in "Tom 
Brown's Schooldays," "Life with Father" 
and to star in the "Henry Aldrich" series. 
Other films have included "Joan of Arc," 
"Time of Your Life," "September Affair" 
and "The Magnificent Yankee." . . . 
Jimmy has appeared in TV dramatic and 
suspense programs and played the lead 
in one of the first TV daytime serials. The 
First Hundred Years. It was while in 
New York for TV appearances that he 
once again met Betty Lou Nedell. They'd 
known each other before — when Betty's 
mother played Jimmy's mother in "Henry 
Aldrich" — were married in New York and 
now have a year-old daughter, Cathy Ann. 
Jimmy holds a private pilot's license, likes 
to take weekend air-trips or else shoulder 
one of the guns he collects and round up 
his best pals for a hunting trip. You can 
write to him, c/o So This Is Hollywood, 
NBC-TV, Sunset and Vine, Hollywood, 
Calif. 



Arf! Arf! 



Would you please give me some in- 
formation on the dog who plays the title 
role in The Adventures Of Rin Tin Tin 
on the ABC-TV network? 

D.W., Colliers, W. Va. 

The dog starring in the TV film series 
is actually Rin Tin Tin IV, whose great- 
grandfather barked silently and drew 
millions of dollars to the hox offices in 
pre-talkie days. The story begins when 



booth 



Lee Duncan was a pilot in World War I. 
He recalls that "when the Germans were 
driven back in the big push at St. Mihiel. 
they left a lot of things behind — including 
five little puppies. I took them over and 
nursed them back to health. They couldn't 
have been over three days old." . . . Lee 
brought two of the dogs back to the 
United States with him, a male he named 
Rin Tin Tin and a female he called 
Nanette. The male was named for the little 
good-luck dolls the French women made 
and sold for charity. . . . \^ hen Lee's friend, 
William Desmond, needed a dog for a 
movie at Universal, he suggested using 
Rin Tin Tin. "That gave me an idea of 
making a picture with Rin Tin Tin." Lee 
remembers. 'T went to Warner Brothers 
and they liked the idea. But. by the time 
we spent $35,000. they ran out of money. 
I managed to borrow some more. The 
picture — 'Where the North Begins.' in 
1923— cost S135.000 and grossed S352.000. 
Rin Tin Tin saved Warner Brothers from 
bankruptcy." 

During the war, Lee Duncan trained 
dogs for the Army. In 1947. he brought 
out "The Return of Rin Tin Tin," star- 
ring Rin Tin Tin IIL Now. the fourth in 
the line, at four years old, is a TV star 
and Rin Tin Tin V, about a year old. looks 
like a comer. 

Amos 'n' Andy 

/ would like to know if Freeman Gosden 
and Charles Correll appear as Amos 'n 
Andy on TV as tcell as radio. 

1.5., Grafton, W. Va. 

No. although Freeman Gosden and 
Charles Correll have played the roles on 
radio since 1928, on TV Amos is played by 
Alvin Childress, Andy by Spencer Wil- 
liams, the Kingfish by Tom Moore. On 
radio Gosden is the Kingfish and Light- 
nin', as well as being Amos Jones, and 
Correll is the voice for Henry Van Porter 
and Andy Brown. 

Man From Marseilles 

Would you give me some information 
on Louis Jourdan, who plays Inspector 
Beaumont on Paris Precinct on TV? 

B.R., Memphis, Tenn. 

Born in Marseilles, Louis Jourdan was 
a prominent actor on the French stage 
and screen when he was brought to this 
countrv- for a role in Alfred Hitchcock's 
"The Paradine Case," in 1947. His dark 
good-looks and Gallic charm have since 
been seen on celluloid in "Letter from an 
Unknown Woman." "Madame Bovary," 
"Anne of the Indies" and "The Happy 
Time." Last year, he made a successful 
debut on the Broadway stage in "The 
Immoralist," an adaptation from the book 
by his countryman, Andre Gide. On TV, 
he has been seen on many of the top 
drama programs, including The Elgin 
Hour and Appointment With Adventure, 
in addition to his role as a member of the 



French Surete in the Paris Precinct series. 
He may return to Broadway for another 
play this fall. 

Aloha 

/ would like to know what has happened 
to Haleloke, the Hawaiian singer who used 
to be on Arthur Godfrey's shows. 

L.F., Massillon, 0. 

Haleloke has remained in New York, 
spreading good will with Orchids of 
Hawaii, Inc., an organization that provides 
information about the islands and ar- 
ranges Hawaiian-style parties. Several 
show-business offers are pending, but 
Haleloke has not yet made any definite 
commitments, at this wTiting. 

Lone Wolf 

Could you tell me something about Louis 
Hayward, who plays the title role in The 
Lone Wolf on TV? 

L. C, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Born in Johannesburg. South Africa's 
diamond and gold capital, Louis Hayward 
struck it rich in acting almost immedi- 
ately. After schooling in France and 
England and a stock company debut, 
Louis, at 22. owned his own stock com- 
pany and earned as much as S500 a week. 
But acting was his first love and he chucked 
the company to act on the London stage. 
His first part, in the great hit, "Beau 
Geste." led to other successes. . . . Finally, 
the American craze for British accents 
brought him to New York for a Lunt and 
Fontanne play and the New York Critics' 
Circle Award of 1935. This, in turn, took 
Louis to Hollywood and a series of swash- 
buckling roles in "Anthony Adverse." 
"The Man in the Iron Mask," "Son of 
Monte Cristo." and so on. Other films in- 
cluded the "Saint" mystery series. "My 
Son. My Son." "Ladies in Retirement" 
(in which he (Continued on page 26) 




Louis Hayward 



SURVEY SHOWS ANSWERS FROM 




NUKOtb suggest 

DOUCHING .« 
ZONITE/or 

feminine hygiene 

Brides-to-Be and Married Women 
Should Know These Intimate Facts 

Every well-informed woman who 
values her health, physical charm 
and married happiness, knows how 
necessary a cleansing, deodorizing 
douche is for intimate feminine clean- 
liness and after monthly periods. 
Douching has become such an es- 
sential practice in the modern way of 
life, another survey showed that of 
the married women asked — 83.3% 
douche after monthly periods and 
86.5% at other times. 

It's a great assurance for women to 
know that zonite is so highly thought 
of among these nurses. Scientific tests 
PROVED no other type liquid anti- 
septic-germicide for the douche of all 
those tested is so po^YERFULLY ef- 
fective yet so SAFE to body tissues. 

ZONITE's Many Advantages 

ZONITE is a powerful antiseptic- 
germicide yet is positively non-poi- 
sonous, non-irritating. You can use 
it as often as needed without the 
slightest risk of injury. A zonite 
douche immediately washes away 
germs and waste deposits. 
It effectively deodorizes and 
leaves you with a wonderful 
sense of well-being and con- 
fidence — so refreshed and 
dainty. Inexpensive — zonite 
costs only a few pennies per 
douche. Use as directed. 



If any abnormal condi- 
tion exists, see your doctor. 




23 



Hum 

and 

Strum 





Thirty years as o team have found Hum 
and Strum entertaining throughout the 
world. Below, on their show, they enjoy a 
visit from great trouper, Joe E. Brown. 



24 




matter how busy, Hum and Strum answer every letter they receive. 



Max Zides and Tom Currier daily show Providence 
viewers the true meaning of "The Personal Touch" 



AMONG the great show-business teams, there has been 
none more loved than the musical team of Max Zides and 
Tom Currier — better known to the world as Hum and Strum. 
Currently, they are regaling WJAR-TV viewers in Rhode Island 
and Massachusetts on their own daily show at 1:30 P.M., as 
guests on Breakfast At The Sheraton, Wednesdays at 9 A.M., 
as regulars on Weekend In New England, Fridays at 10:45 P.M. 

The story of Max and Tom's great friendship began thirty -five 
years ago when they were track-team mates at Boston's 
Commercial High School. Several years later, in 1924 — when 
Max was working on the Boston Globe and Tom was a long- 
distance truck driver — they met in a music office and started 
fooling around with a song or two. Soon they were filling 
vaudeville engagements together, then they went on radio. In 
addition to their air shows, they played the great Keith circuit, 
appearing in every major vaudeville house in the country with 
such headliners as Burns and Allen, Guy Lombardo and Phil 
Silvers. In 1931, when television was almost unheard of, Max 
and Tom made experimental telecasts, although, they say now, 
"Our thoughts were that television would never come in our 
lifetime. We believed it was a dream for future centuries." 
Nevertheless, after World War II, they became TV regulars. 

In their original act, both boys strummed the ukulele and 
hummed many of their numbers — hence the name of their act. 
Today, Max no longer plays the uke because of a case of 
"occupational arthritis" which occurs only when he plays. Tom 
provides the musical accompaniment on "half a piano." 

As in their partnership. Max and Tom are the best of friends in 
private life. Max married his childhood sweetheart and they 
now live in Brookline with their sons — Alan, 15 and Danny, 11. 
Tom, who lives in near-by Braintree with his wife, also has 
two sons — Tom, Jr., 23, and Terry, 20. While Max likes to relax 
at golf, Tom prefers flying, and was once a stunt pilot. 

There is a third dimension to Hum and Strum's friendship — 
with their audiences. As Tom aptly puts it, "When you stop 
appealing to them, you might as well fold your tent and silently 
steal away." The boys' great personal touch also results from 
their attitude toward their work. "You can't call this work," 
says Max. "That's right," adds Tom. "We like this much better 
than working." From all reports, WJAR-TViewers share the 
same happy view about Hum and Strum. 





^BP^ 












Now, a new gentleness . . . undreamed-of comfort . . . the luxury of 
a fabric covering that's soft as a whisper. Today, more than ever, it's 



Modess . . . .y^ec^:Zcc,s^^^^ 



26 



Now.. .compliment-catching hair for you! 

Today you can look as young as you feel, because modern beauty aids 
make it so easy for you to keep an attractive and youthful appearance. 
But, in the same way regular skin care is necessary to conceal age- 
revealing wrinkles, your hair also needs regular care to keep 

it gleaming and full of color and life. 

Quite simply.. .hair should be pampered 

just as much as the face beneath! 

Follow your next shampoo with ^ 

a NOREEN temporary rinse, for 

it will bring back lustre and 

color to your hair . . . leave it 

soft and gleaming .. . 

young again. Choose your i 

shade of NOREEN from ^ 

fourteen natural 



hair tones. 

M cosmetic counters 

everywhere. 

8 rinses 60^ plus tax. 

Color applicator 40^. 

Also professionally 

applied in 

beauty salons. 



; **% "^^ . 





-/l^Vec/^ 



® 



COLOR 

HAIR 
RINSE 



Information Booth 

{Continued) 



co-starred with his former wife, Ida 
Lupino), "Walic a Crooked Mile," "Duffy 
of San Quentin" and many others. . . . 
Louis became an American citizen on 
December 6, 1941, spent the war years 
with the Marines, rising to the rank of 
captain and earning the Bronze Star and 
Presidenaal Citation. Since the war, he 
has operated his own Associated Film 
Artists production organization. In film 
circles, it's said he rides with Lady Luck. 
Acting or producing, his every picture 
has been a money-maker. . . . Off-camera, 
Louis' friends are few, but close ones. 
His favorite diversion is a sudden, un- 
planned dash to an out-of-the-way place. 
He's enthusiastic about the opera, theater 
and concerts, likes ice-hockey, rugby and 
fencing, and keeps in trim with daily 
workouts in his own gym. , 

Quartet Query \ 

Could you tell me whether two of the 
men in the Foggy River Boys quartet are 
brothers? The quartet sings on Red 
Foley's Ozark Jubilee. 

G.M., Herndon, Va. 

Yes, the brothers in the quartet are 
William and Monte Matthews. The two 
other Foggy River Boys are Charles 
Hutton and James Holmes. 

Calling All Fans 

The following clubs invite new mem- 
bers. If you are interested in joining, 
write to the address given — not to TV 
Radio Mirror. 

Jayne and Audrey Meadows Fan Club, 
c/o Sally Powers, 2 North Broadway, 
White Plains, N.Y. 

Rosemary Clooney Fan Club, c/o 
Shirley McElroy, 218 N. Gray St., Zanes- 
ville, 0. 

Phonorama Club (Johnny Desmond), 
c/o Arleen Ristav, 588 Majestic Circle, 
Arondale Estates, Ga. 

Lucille Wall Fan Club, c/o Billy Banks, 
5303 Wriley Rd., Westhaven, Md. 

On- And OfF-Camera 

Would you tell me if Marge and Stu 
Bergman, in the CBS-TV dramatic serial, 
Search For Tomorrow, are man and wife 
in real life? A. McD., Peabody, Mass. 

No. Melba Rae, who plays Marge, is 
unmarried. Larry Haines, her TV husband 
Stu, has a wife named Trudy in private life. 



FOR YOUR INFORMATION— If 

there's something you want to know 
about radio and television, write to 
Information Booth, TV Radio Mirror, 
205 East 42 St., New York 17, N. Y. 
We'll answer, if we can, provided your 
question is of general interest. Answers 
will appear in this column — but be 
sure to attach this box to your letter, 
and specify whether your question 
concerns radio or TV. 



IF YOU NEED 



HHMI 



■■Rib-W»OYe' 
Junior with 
convertible 
neckline. 



*■ 



Wrinkle* 
reiisloflt 
suiting with fl I 
luxury look. 



Khinestont '^ 
_g^ studded, 

^, \ sporkcdwith 

white. 



\ 



J^ 



/ 










FASHION FROCKS INC. 

0«pt. T-3053 • Cincinnati 25, Ohio 

In Canada, North American FasKJon 

Frocks, ltd. 

2163 Partltenais, Dapt. T-3053 

Montrtal, P.Q. 






HERE 



FOR YOU! 

Make all the extra money 
you want in spare time. 
Take orders for beautiful 
Fashion Frocks— low as 
$3.98 each. Over 100 dif- 
ferent styles, colors, fabrics. 
We furnish fabric samples. 
You risk nothing. Absolutely 
no experience needed. Try 
it— mail coupon below. 







at last! 




ITS LIQUID 



A LIQUID SHAMPOO 

that's EXT R^% KICH • 




Something wonderful has 
happened — it's fabulous new 
Liquid Prell! The only shampoo 
in the world with this exciting, 
extra-rich formula! It bursts 
instantly into luxurious lather . . . 
rinses like lightning ... is 
so mild you could shampoo 
every day. And, oh, the look 
and feel of your hair after 
just one shampoo! So satin-y 
soft, so shiny bright, 
so obedient— why, it falls into 
place with just a flick of your 
comb! Shouldn't your hair have 
that 'Radiantly Alive' look? 
Try Liquid Prell this very night! 




JUST POUR IT ... 

and you'll see the glorious difference! 



Some liquid shampoos are 

too thin and watery . . . 

some too heavy, and contain an 

ingredient tliat leaves a dulling film. 

But Prell has a "just-right" 

consistency — it won't run and 

never leaves a dulling film. 




T->i 



■•REL.L— for 'Radiantly Alive' Hair 
now available 2 ways: 

The exciting, new extra-rich liquid 
in the handsome, easy-grip bottle! 

And the famous, handy tube 
that's ideal for children and 
the whole family . . . won't spill, 
drip, or break. It's 
concentrated — ounce for 
ounce it goes further I 



CREATED BY I 





a VERY GOOD NEIGHBOR 



Heavy TV schedules lighten, as Dennis relaxes contentedly with his wife Micki at their Echo Bay home. 



Dennis James has always 
known the best way to have 
a friend is to be one! 
By ERNST JACOBI 



DURING THE DIM, distant days of television's infancy, about 
eight years ago, a young man by the name of Dennis 
Janies was once asked to do an extended commercial 
for Josiah Wedgwood dinnerware. After some introductory 
remarks, he was to narrate a film describing the 
Wedgwood factories in England, and the film was to start 
at his mention of the word "mud" — which is used as a 
first step in the manufacturing process. However, at this 
precise moment, something went wrong with the film 
and Dennis was given the signal to "stretch." 

"I had to keep stalling for four and a half minutes," 
Dennis i-eports. "That wouldn't have been so bad, but I 



See Next Page 



29 



a VERY GOOD NEIGHBOR 



(Continued) 




Telethons to combat cerebral palsy take up much of 
Dennis James' limited time — and his unlimited heart. 
Nothing is quite so rewarding as the opportunity to 
help such courageous youngsters as Charles Stahlberg, 
a "poster boy" for United Cerebral Palsy appeals. 




As emcee of CBS-TV's On Your Account, Dennis put on 
G special program during Hospital Week and was made 
on honorary member of the Caledonia Hospital Society. 
Joyce Parkhurst, student nurse, and Patricia Burns, 
nurse, presented him with certificate of membership. 





Boating — from his own pier — is one of his greatest hobbies. 



couldn't get away from the subject of mud, and there's 
a limit to what you can say about it. I talked about 
mud packs, mud baths, mud pies, plain mud, ordinary 
mud, special mud, useful mud, and nq-good dirty 
mud. I even tried a rhyme and came up with 'Maybe 
you think I'm chewing my cud — while all I'm doing is 
talking about mud.' Those were the longest four and 
a half minutes I ever lived through in my life." 

Dennis' ability not to let circumstances faze him has 
made him the delightof sponsors, network executives, 
and — ^most important of all — a large and devoted 
viewing audience. Not long ago, when he was inter- 
viewing a very hervous singer on Chance Of A Lifetime, 
the scenery on the stage collapsed with a loud crash 
— though, fortunately, out of camera range. "Do you 
hear how they're knocking themselves out for you?" 
Dennis asked. "Now, I want you to go out and knock 
them dead in turn." Reassured, the girl went on and 
was great. And when an elderly gentleman on Dennis' 
CBS-TV daytime show. On Your Account, had a fit 
of sneezes and lost his upper dentures, Dennis tactfully 
saved what might have been an embarrassing situation 
by his hearty "Gesundheit!" Then he added another 
little rhyme: "A sneeze, whenever it occurs, is 
welcome as a kitten's purrs." By that time, both 
dentures and calm were restored. 

Dennis says that it's come to the point where he looks 
forward to the unexpected. "It's sort of a challenge 
that helps me prove to myself that I can still 
think on my feet." 

It has not been recorded in the annals of television 
or radio that this ability has ever failed Dennis or 
that he's ever been at a loss for words. He shuns 
prepared scripts wherever possible, scorns tele- 
prompters or cue cards, and doesn't use writers for his 
material, relying entirely on his quick-wittedness, 
his spontaneous sense of humor, his sincerity and 
warmth. "I'm no comedian. When I'm before a 
camera, I just try to be myself," he says. "And I'm 
satisfied if I can come across with a degree of warmth 
and humanity." That he succeeds {Continued on page 69) 

Dennis James emcees On Your Account, CBS-TV, M-F, 4:30 P.M. 
EDT, sponsored by Procter & Gamble for Tide and Prell — and Chance 
Of A Lifetime, ABC-TV, Sun., 9 P.M. EDT, sponsored by Tweed and 
other Lentheric fragrances, and Bromo-Seltzer (Emerson Drug. Co.) 



30 





mmm^^ 



'.afeTn* 




Micki's learned to love water sports, too, and they often launch a boot just to go calling on their neighbors. Their swimming 
pool is another of their delights. They like informal picnics — end friendly get-togethers in Dennis' well-filled "trophy room." 





Dennis enjoys cooking on the outdoor barbecue — particularly the Italian specialties so dear to his childhood. Below, right, he 
proudly introduces his parents, Teresa and Demetrlo Sposo, and his brother Lou — who directs Chance Of A Lifetime, over ABC-TV. 




vtinso^ie: 

ANNIE OAKLEir 




Gail can really ride! She can also 
handle Annie's favorite Winchester — 
OS Gene Autry (foreground) and channp 
John J. Crowley (left) can well testify. 




Riding on location, dancing on a 
date, Gail Davis shows how a smart 
girl can always aim for glamour 

By PEER J. OPPENHEIMER 



To THE OLDER FOLKS, the middle-aged 
group and the "young-married" couples, 
Gail Davis was just about the most 
glamorous girl at the Grand Ball — the 
highlight of Little Rock's Rose Festival— as she 
led the Grand Parade on the arm of 
Lieutenant Hoyt Allen. The Lieutenant wore 
his white Naval uniform. Gail also wore 
white, a beautiful, off-the-shoulder, nylon 
gown with a tight bodice and billowing skirt. 

But, to the younger fans in her home 
town, she was a disappointment. They 
thought the gun-toting, fast-riding heroine 
of the Annie Oakley series was far more 
glamorous in her cowgirl outfit, gun belt with 
six-shooters slung around her waist, a 
wide-brimmed Stetson jauntily perched on 
her head. Two worlds. Two points of 
view. Two attitudes toward the same girl. 
Or is she the same girl? 

"In a way, I live a double life," says Gail. 
"I've always been tomboyish, loved to 
ride, climb trees, wear jeans. But at the 
same time I wanted to be feminine, 
glamorous and sophisticated. I've been com- 
peting with myself!" 

That's the story of a girl who has fifteen 
glamorous evening gowns in her closet, 
side by side with a dozen cowgirl outfits, 
who puts on her (Continued on page 75) 

Gail Davis stars in the title role of Annie Oakley, as 
produced for TV by Gene Autry's Flying A Pictures. 
See local papers for time and station in your area. ' 



32 





Even as a little girl, Sail 
loved her mother's pretty 
clothes — and her perfume. 




She still believes in being 
feminine today — and is, 
on the set or at home. 




-WINSOME 
ANNIE OAKLEY 




Gail can really ridel She can also 
handle Annie's favorite Winchester — 
OS Gene Autry (foreground) and champ 
John J. Crowley (left) can well testify. 




Riding on location, dancing on a 
date, Gail Davis shows how a smart 
girl can always aim for glamour 

By PEER J. OPPENHEIMER 



To THE OLDER FOLKS, the middle-aged 
group and the "young-married" couples, 
Gail Davis was just about the most 
glamorous girl at the Grand Ball — the 
highlight of Little Rock's Rose Festival— as she 
led the Grand Parade on the arm of 
Lieutenant Hoyt Allen. The Lieutenant wore 
his white Naval uniform. Gail also wore 
white, a beautiful, off-the-shoulder, nylon 
gown with a tight bodice and billowing skirt. 

But, to the younger fans in her home 
town, she was a disappointment. They 
thought the gun-toting, fast-riding heroine 
of the Annie Oakley series was far more 
glamorous in her cowgirl outfit, gun belt with 
six-shooters slung around her waist, a 
wide-brimmed Stetson jauntily perched on 
her head. Two worlds. Two points of 
view. Two attitudes toward the same girl. 
Or is she the same girl? 

"In a way, I live a double life," says Gail. 
"I've always been tomboyish, loved to 
ride, climb trees, wear jeans. But at the 
same time I wanted to be feminine, 
glamorous and sophisticated. I've been com- 
peting with myself!" 

That's the story of a girl who has fifteen 
glamorous evening gowns in her closet, 
side by side with a dozen cowgirl outfits, 
who puts on her (Continued on page 75) 

Gail Davis stars in tlie title role of Annie Oakley, a.1 
produced for TV by Gene Autry's Flying A Picture!!. 
See local papers for time and station in your area. ' 





Evan as a little girl, Sail 
loved her mother's pretty 
clothes — and her perfume. 




She still believes in being 
feminine today — and is, 
on the set or at home. 





Clothes mark the man: Fess forsakes horse for plane as he tours the country. 

Fess Parker fits every description of 
a legendary hero— particularly 
that beloved giant, Davy Crockett! 




Davy Crockett fans experienc 



34 



\Mlqktj McMt ii Ht 




By FREDDA DUDLEY BALLING 

FESS Parker has appeared in ten motion pic- 
tures, the latest and most important of 
which is "Davy Crockett, King of the Wild 
Frontier," and he has starred in three television 
films on 'Disneyland — "Davy Crockett, Indian 
Fighter," "Davy Crockett Goes to Congress," and 
"Davy Crockett at The Alamo." Comparatively 
speaking, this is not extensive film footage for 
a newcomer, but Fess Parker's fast fame proves 
that uranium is where you find it. He is 
authentic Geiger-quaking, fissionable material — 
aU six feet, five inches of him — but the only atomic 
fallout expected by Walt Disney, who has Fess 
under long-term contract, is pennies from heaven. 
Or, more likely, thousand-dollar bills. 
. To get a few things straightened out at once: 
Fess Parker is his square moniker, and Fess, in 
Old English, means "proud." In heraldry, a ]ess 
is a wide, horizontal band across the middle of 
an escutcheon — usually constructed of some such 



See Next Page 



Fess, in his first starring role, studies the Davy Crockett script 
with Walt Disney and Norman Foster, director of the famed film. 



the thrill of a lifetime as they meet their idol in person. 





Clothes mark the man: Fess forsakes horse for plane as he tours the country. 

Fess Parker fits every description of 
a legendary hero — particularly 
that beloved giant, Davy Crockett! 



Oi Miqktif Mem A //e 



34 




By FREDDA DUDLEY BALLING 

FESS Parker has appeared in ten motion pic- 
tures, the latest and most important o£ 
which is "Davy Crockett, King of the Wild 
Frontier," and he has starred in three television 
films on Disneyland — "Davy Crockett, Indian 
Fighter," "Davy Crockett Goes to Congress," and 
"Davy Crockett at The Alamo." Comparatively 
speaking, tliis is not extensive film footage for 
a newcomer, but Fess Parker's fast fame proves 
that uraniimi is where you find it. He is 
authentic Geiger-quaking, fissionable material — 
all six feet, five inches of him^but the only atomic 
fallout expected by Walt Disney, who has Fess 
under long-term contract, is pennies from heaven. 
Or, more likely, thousand-dollar bills. 
, To get a few things straightened out at once; 
Fess Parker is his square moniker, and Fess, in 
Old English, means "proud." In heraldry, a jess 
is a wide, horizontal band across the middle of 
an escutcheon — usually constructed of some such 



See Next Page 



► 



Fess, in his first starring role, studies the Davy Crockett script 
with Walt Disney and Norman Foster, director of the famed film. 



Davy Crockett fans expen 





Fess Parker, star of Walt Disney's full-length feature film, 
"Davy Crockett, King of the Wild Frontier," also stars in thp 
popular "Davy Crockett" episodes on Disneyland, as seen over 
ABC-TV, Wed., 7:30 P.M. EDT, sponsored by the American Mo- 
tors Corp., Derby Foods, Inc., and the American Dairy Association. 



a Miqk/q Mem i& fk 

(.Continued) 

opulent fabric as ermine, velvet, silver or gold. In 
spite of all this implied fanfare, Fess himself has 
never looked up the Parker family crest for fear of 
finding on it a small biscuit rampant — the Parker 
House roll. 

Born in Fort Worth, Texas, ma'am, Fess grew up 
in San Angelo. He started his college career at Texas 
A. and M., transferred to Hardin-Simmons (where 
he hoped to play four years of college football), 
served three years in the Navy — rising from ap- 
prentice seaman to seaman, first class — returned to 
Hardin-Simmons briefly, and then moved to the Uni- 
versity of Texas, where he earned his degree. He 
also attended U.S.C. in Los Angeles, where he 
knocked out his master's degree in Theater Arts. His 
fraternity is Pi Kappa Alpha. 

At this point, it might be remarked that Fess is 
not ohly a picture and TV star, but a recording artist, 
as well — a fact which makes at least one woman 
furious. The lady in question stormed into a Los 
Angeles record shop and asked the salesman whether 
he had the Fess Parker platter of "The Ballad of 
Davy Crockett." Apologetically, the salesman ad- 
mitted that he was temporarily out of the number, 
but added that a new supply would arrive shortly. 
Meanwhile, he said, a number of guitar-and-gullet 
boys had waxed the song . . . 

"I don't want a substitute," snapped the shopper. 
"I wdnt Fess or nothing. This is the seventh record 
shop I've tried, and every single one of them is sold 
out. It makes me simply furious." 

(Note to the lady: By the time you read this, you 
will be able to buy— not only "The Ballad"— but a 
45 rpm Columbia recording of the three "Davy 
Crockett" dramas which have been telecast.) 



At The Alamo: Hans Conreid as Thimblerig, Nick Crovot 
as Bustedluck, join Fess and Buddy In their last stahd. 



36 






Raised on a ranch in Texas, bachelor Fess has long known how to take care of himself, hie lives modestly in a small but 
comfortable house in Hollywood, keeps a neat yard, and con scramble up a "mean" egg to satisfy his hearty appetite. 



Incidentally, the beginnings of Fess' guitar playing 
(so vital a part of "The Ballad of Davy Crockett") are 
shrouded in mystery. One version is that he was born 
with a guitar in one hand and a Texas bluebonnet in 
the other. A more comfortable theory is that, while 
Fess was a student at the University of Texas, folk 
singer Burl Ives appeared at the college on concert 
tour. Fess was so impressed with Ives' performance — 
and discovered himself to be so completely at home 
with the material used and the interpretation em- 
ployed — that he could talk of nothing else for weeks. 
His girl friend finally retaliated by buying Fess a 
guitar for Christmas. 

Of course, it was a gag gift for which she had paid 
only a few dollars at the local music store, but Fess 
elected to take it seriously. So seriously that he asked 
if she would be hurt if he traded in the six-stringer 
for a fine instrument. She said something like no, not 
if he wouldn't practice under her balcony — and that 
did it. 

From that moment to this, scarcely a day has gone 
by during which Fess has not fovmd a few moments 
in which to beat out chords. Between scenes on the 
set, he can be found strumming and humming, com- 
posing melodies of his own. His only periods of string- 
less silence — sometimes lasting a week — are brought 
on by attendance at a Segovia concert. "The man has a 
kind of magic," he says, grinning in wry appreciation. 
"It doesn't seem human for one pair of hands to get 
so much music out of a guitar." 

His regional drawl (more Southern than Texan) , his 
quiet manner, his far-flung stature, his steady eyes — 
and his air of considered calm — convey at least one 
wrong impression. A stranger (Continued on page 86) 




A guitar player since college days, Fess composes his 
own tunes, enjoys duets with girl friend Marcy Rinehart. 



37 



TWICE BLESSED 




Mr. and Mrs. Charles Novotny of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, were 
aboard the Queen Mary when they learned their number had 
won! Below, Janis Carter welcomed them back from Europe. 



(- 




Feather Your Nesi, NBC-TV, M-F, 12:30 P.M. EDT— for 
Colgate-Palmolive, Cavalier Cigarettes, other products. 



Fate had an inspiring surprise in 
store, when Feather Your Nest 
presented a house to the Novotnys 



By LILLA ANDERSON 

THE STAFF at Feather Your Nest was still 
buzzing. "You should have been here 
yesterday," said George Backman, the set 
designer. . . . "You never saw such a thing," 
said a stagehand. . . . "Bud Collyer got all 
choked up and red in the face and Janis Carter 
couldn't talk, she was that surprised," said 
Randy Kraft, the announcer. . . . "The people 
who won the house darned near broke up the 
show," said Louise Hammett, the associate 
producer. 

Breaking up that tight, competent, happy gang 
takes some doing. I got a word in edgewise: 
"What actually happened?" And Pearl Penney, 
who is- in charge of the prizes, explained: "They 
said nothing had ever meant so much to them 
as winning this house. So they brought Bud a 
silk tie from Italy and Janis some costume 
jewelry from Paris. It's never happened before. 
Contestants just don't do that." 

Everyone nodded. This, they indicated, was 
their own, particular (Continued on page 84) 



Charlie and Glad were a 



38 





Bud Collyer, emcee of Feather Your Nest, handed the Novotnys the key to their dream house, as hostess Janis beamed. 
Skogman showed them their P & H "Lakeside" model home — which had even more meaning for the Novotnys than a new house. 




39 



TWICE BLESSED 




Mr. and Mrs. Charles Novotny of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, were 
aboard the Queen Mary when they learned their number had 
won! Below, Janis Carter welcomed them back from Europe. 




fyatherYour A-e.,, NBC-TV. M-F. 12:30 P.M. EDT-for 
Colgate-Palmolive, Cavalier Cigarettes, other products. 



Fate had an inspiring surprise in 
store, when Feather Your Nest 
presented a house to the Novotnys 

By LILLA ANDERSON 



THE STAFF at Feather Your Nest was still 
buzzing. "You should have been here 
yesterday," said George Backman, the set 
designer. . . . "You never saw such a thing," 
said a stagehand. . . . "Bud CoUyer got all 
choked up and red in the face and Janis Carter 
couldn't talk, she was that surprised," said 
Randy Kraft, the announcer. . . . "The people 
who won the house darned near broke up the 
show," said Louise Hammett, the associate 
producer. 

Breaking up that tight, competent, happy gang 
takes some doing. I got a word in edgewise: 
"What actually happened?" And Pearl Penney, 
who is-in charge of the prizes, explained: "They 
said nothing had ever meant so much to them 
as winning this house. So they brought Bud a 
silk tie from Italy and Janis some costume 
jewelry from Paris. It's never happened before. 
Contestants just don't do that." 

Everyone nodded. This, they indicated, was 
their own, particular (Continued on page 84) 



Charlie and Glad were all snniles as builder LeRoy 




Bud Collyer, emcee of Feather Your Nest, handed the Novotnys the key to their dream house, as hostess Janis beamed. 
Skogman showed them their P & H "Lakeside" model home— which had even more meaning for the Novotnys than a new house. 




39 



)WP*^ja«V 







V, ^ 





ffo/td^y Tim for 



^i 



IX 



7. 




^ 






• 



..■,.1^ 



Coney Island was as much of a thrill to Godfrey's small guests from the Henry Street Settlement as it was to 

Arthur himself — and he was as excited as any of 'em. His own Little Godfreys were somewhat timid about the various "rides," 

requiring his constant reassurance. Below, he grasps Phyllis McGuire's hand as they swing in the Chairoplone. 



When the world's gayest redhead takes 
over the world's gayest playground, 
anything can happen — and so it does ! 



By MARTIN COHEN 



IF A MAN is as old as he feels, the world- 
famous one with the red hair and freckles 
has no business rxinning around in long 
pants. The day Arthur Godfrey spent at Coney 
Island, he acted like a nine-year-old — give or 
take a year. There were four hundred 
children from the Henry Street Settlement as 
Arthur's guests, but you needed a score card to 
tell the Godfrey gang from the kids. 



mtm 



41 





V 




Holiday Tine for 




Coney Island was as much of a thrill to Godfrey's small guests from the Henry Street Settlement as it was to 

Arthur himself — and he was as excited as any of 'em. His own Little Godfreys were somewhat timid about the various "ride 

requiring his constant reassurance. Below, he grosps Phyllis McGuire's hand as they swing in the Chairoplane. 



When the world's gayest redhead takes 
over the world's gayest playground, 
anything can happen — and so it does ! 



By MARTIN COHEN 



IF A MAN is as old as he feels, the world- 
famous one with the red hair and freckles 
has no business running around in long 
pants. The day Arthur Godfrey spent at Coney 
Island, he acted like a nine-year-old— give or 
take a year. There were four hundred 
children from the Henry Sti-eet Settlement as 
Arthur's guests, but you needed a score card to 
tell the Godfrey gang from the kids. 



SODFRIY 





Holiday Tine for SODFREY 



{Continued) 



"This is the greatest fun," he said, and for the 
next hour laughed harder than a Macy's Santa 
Claus. 

Fun it was but, to be downright objective, some 
of those screams of joy sounded mighty like 
screams of anguish. And they'll tell you the color 
was something — and it was — the shimmering 
scramble of the merry -go-roUnd bulbs, the bold 
stripes of Arthur's fancy coveralls, the Godfrey 
gals in red and green dresses with faces to match. 

"Such fun," Arthur kept saying. "I can't re- 
member when I ever had such fun." 

The show from Steeplechase Park had been 
in the works for a few years. For one good rea- 
son or another, it was put off until this summer. 
When Arthur gave the go-ahead, director Bobby 
Bleyer, Arthur's assistant Freddie Hendrickson, 
and a crew of technicians swarmed over the 
Park. They checked for acoustics. They timed 
the rides. They planned a route for the cast. 
And talk about rehearsals — days, weeks, months 
— this one had none. The evening before the 
telecast, Arthur came out to the Park and stayed 
until midnight. He literally rehearsed for the 
entire cast. 

"Arthur was on every ride at least a half- 
dozen times," a spy from NBC reports. "He said 
that he was doing it for the sake of the show, 
but he was really having the time of his life." 

The Little Godfreys were kept away until near 
show time, for Arthur felt that getting their first 



Whirlpool: Godfrey in center, back to camera — flanked 
by Janette and assorted McSuires — with Frank Parker 
to his right and Carmel Quinn poised in the foreground. 



Arthur whooshed happily down the breathtaking Pan- 
ama Slide, as the McGuire Sisters prepared to follow 
and Janette Davis (top right) hesitated — and hesitated. 

Arthur Godfrey Time, on CBS Radio, M-F, 10 A.M., and CBS- 
TV, M-Th, 10:30 A.M., and Arthur Godfrey's Digest, on CBS 
Radio, Fri., 8 P.M.; multiple sponsorship. Arthur Godfrey's Tal- 
ent Scouts, on CBS-TV and CBS Radio, Men., 8:30 P.M., spon- 
sored by Thomas J. Lipton, Inc. and CBS-Columbia. (All EDT^ 



42 



reactions to the rides would be more fun. The 
McGuire Sisters were singing in Pittsburgh that 
week. Arthur sent his plane down for them and 
they got to the Park about an hour before broad- 
cast time. Janette Davis, who was supposed to 
be vacationing in Europe, startled even Arthur 
by walking into the studio that same morning. 
She had landed at International Airport at nine- 
thirty A.M. Actually, Jan had got homesick and 
cut her vacation short by three weeks. And, of 
course, Carmel Quinn and Tony Marvin were 
on hand. 

The wardrobe department had brought clothes 
for everyone. Arthur and Frank Parker, Tony 
Marvin and dance director Harry Rogue, all 
wore fancy bib-overalls. Arthur wore a bright- 
yellow shirt under his blazing blue stripes. 

The case history of the women's clothes is 
intriguing. The man in charge of buying and 
supplying clothes had brought in form-fitting, 
faille, mechanic-type suits for the girls, plus flat 
shoes. 

"No, no, no," said Arthur with incisive realism. 
"If women are going to dress up like test pilots, 
men will stop going to amusement parks with, 
them. If you can't see a bit of ankle and calf, 
then we might as well go back to Manhattan and 
play pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey." 

The wardrobe man was a magician. He put 
the coveralls back on the rack and brought out 
some new dresses, pink {Continued on page 78) 



Around and around they go — and where they'll 
land nobody knows! Janette was the last to spin 
off. Godfrey alone maintained his equilibrium. 




Janette had no fears of the parachute jump, made 
two trips with Tony Marvin. Godfrey was good with 
a target rifle — and a crack shot with a baseball! 







The $64,000 Question 



For Hal March, it isn't making money 

— or even giving it away. It's: 

How long is he going to be a bachelor? 

By GREGORY MERWIN 





Contestant Redmond O'Hanlon waits as Hal reaches for the 
envelope which might have led him to the $64,000 Question. 
Banker Ben Feit is the custodian of both cash and queries. 

ALL THE PEOPLE in this story are really people, 
except for Hal March . . . sometimes he's a 
character — and why not? — for he is or has been a 
boxer, actor, writer, lover, comedian, burlesque-type 
baritone, ah unhappy bachelor, a happy bachelor . . . 
and now he's got the job of passing out dollars by 
the bucketful! 

"The way I hear it," Hal {Continued on page 90) 



Hal March emcees The $64,000 Question on CBS-TV, Tues., 10 
P.M. EDT, for the Revlon Products Corporation. He co-stars with 
Tom D'Andrea in The Soldiers, on NBC-TV, Sat., 8 P.M., EDT. 



Hal March and Tom D'Andrea have an informal look 
at the script for their situation comedy, The Soldiers. 

Commuting to New York from California, Hal camps comfortably in a hotel apartment, catches up on his East Coast mail 
. . . watches his beloved Giants play ball on TV . . . and learns how to live out of a suitcase, in real stage-trouper style. 





Bill and Mary wed in college. Today, they count their 
blessings: Growing mail from his TV fans, a gold disc 
for his first million-sale record, a lovely home — and 
lively Carrie, 7, Billy, 5, Cathy, 4, and Tommy, 1. 




Bill Hayes is always lucky— whether 
meeting Mary, making records, or 
singing on Sid Caesar's big new show 




(m 




By FRANCES KISH 



THE SEVEN GIRLS With previous commitments, 
who had to turn down Bill Hayes when he telephoned 
for a date, couldn't know that destiny was on the 
side of Mary Hobbs. Mary was a sorority sister 
of Bill's cousin, and she was eighth on the list of 
possible dates the cousin had given him. The only 
reason Mary happened to be free that evening was that 
she was angry at her own date. It would prove to 
that young man she didn't have to stay at home, 
moping over him! 

Practically any girl in town would have said "yes" 
to a date with Bill Hayes, if she could. He was 
a handsome five-foot, nine-and-a-half-inch college 



46 



Continued 









•.- 1^*- 




/ 



# 




i. 



I 




Their present home on Long Island is the fulfillment 
of o dream Bill and Mary had since the makeshift 
rooms of early student days and their years of touring. 





/e^_rwe 



(ContvaneA) 



junior, with wavy black hair, nice gray-blue eyes. He 
had a smile which came suddenly and lit up his whole 
face, a quiet speaking voice and manner, and a fine 
singing voice. He was a serious musician who played 
the violin, piano and guitar. In sum, he was an alto- 
gether attractive and eligible young man. (All of which 
were also good reasons for Mary Hobbs to become Mrs. 
Mary Hayes a little more than a year later.) 

Now, some ten years after that first date. Bill is still 
a quiet and serious young man — though he's a highly 
popular TV personality in the musical revue produced 
by Sid Caesar, with such co-stars as Phil Foster, Bobby 
Sherwood and Barbara Nichols. Bill has to his credit 
a fabulously successful Cadence recording of "The 
Ballad of Davy Crockett" — well past the million and a 
half mark in sales — and a newer one called "The Berry 
Tree," which is climbing up fast. Behind him are such 
successes as three and a half years on Your Show Oj 
Shows, with Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca; the juvenile 
leads in a long-run romantic Broadway musical, "Me 
and Juliet," and a Hollywood movie, "Stop, You're 
Killing Me!" — plus innumerable leads in srnnmer stock, 
hundreds of personal appearances, dozens of guest shots 
on radio and television. You could say that this Bill 
Hayes is a young man who has definitely "arrived." 

You wouldn't guess any of this if you saw him at 
home, however, with the four lively Hayes yoimgsters — 
who make Bill seem even quieter and calmer by con- 
trast. Besides his own brood, the neighbors' kids usually 
come a-shouting when his canary-colored convertible 
turns into the driveway of the ranch-type house the 
Hayes live in, on Long Island. It's a pretty house, cedar- 
shingled with pale-green trim, with room for a growing 
family and for a boxer named Mister and a white cat 
named Snowball. 



Bill Hayes sings on Sid Caesar's new hour-long revue over NBC-TV, 
three Mondays out of four, from 8 to 9 P.M. EDT, as sponsored by 
Lee Limited (for Dri-Mist and Sof-Set No-Lac), American Chicle 
Co. (Dentyne chewing gum), Remington Rand Eleptric Shavers. 



jiif 




Special family quor+et — Bill Hayes III and Bill Hayes IV, Carrie and Cathy — blending voices in guess what ballad? 



The children aie seven-year-old Carrie (full name 
Carolyn, but nobody calls her that) ; five-year-old Billy 
(BUI Hayes IV, named after his father, his grandfather 
and great-grandfather); Cathy, a merry four-year-old; 
and Tommy, a friendly, laughing toddler. The boys look 
like Bill, except that they have blond hair. The girls 
look like Mary, who is a five-foot, four-inch, blue-eyed, 
slender, strawberry blonde. Cathy, in particular, is the 
image of her mother, with the same gold-red long bob 
and bangs. 

Mary sighs a little over the fact that there isn't a child 
in the lot with Bill's shining dark hair. Or, right now, 
with Bill's quiet voice! The noise at times can be 
shattering — ^but not to Bill. He may come home, ex- 



hausted from long rehearsals and quick personal- 
appearance trips and business conferences. Yet he'll sit 
there and listen to the kids as if their shrieks and 
laughter were the muted music of some far-off 
symphony. He just likes kids. 

Sometimes, when three or four of the neighbors' chil- 
dren join his own and the going gets too rough, he will 
ask gently, "Will you kids play outside for a while?" — 
adding a "Please." It's the closest he comes to a com- 
mand, but they understand, and out they go without too 
much fuss. But, mostly, it's Mary who shoos them away 
when Bill wants to rest or read. 

"If you want a typical picture of my husband with 
the children," she observes, {Continued on page 82) 



49 




t. 





Unexpected 
Romance 



At three o'clock in the morning, in the baronial ele- 
f\ gance of the Hotel Plaza's Oak Room, Miss 
Patricia Wheel . . . young and lovely star of 
NBC Radio's The Doctor's Wife, featured player in 
CBS-TV's The Guiding Light, and talented charmer of 
assorted television dramas . . . gazed across the table 
at her handsome companion, Eric Henry Alba 
Teran, and — as definitely as though she were reading 
a line of script — said silently to herself, "I like this man." 

Among those never-to-be-forgotten moments by 
which a woman marks the course of her love, usually 
the first is that one in which her secret heart tells 
her conscious mind, "I like this man." For Pat, 
however, it was belated and consequently confusing. 

Seated in the charming garden (Continued on page 88) 




To Patricia Wheels love andl marriage 
were but distant dreams — then, 
suddenly, the right man came along! 



By HELEN BOLSTAD 




Interest in her work first brought Pat and Eric 
Henry Alba Teran together. Now, she's fascinated 
by his career as an industrial designer — and both 
are busy with projects in their garden apartment. 




Patricia Wheel is Julie Palmer in The Doctor's Wife, as 
written by Manya Starr, NBC Radio, M-F, 10:30 A.M. She is 
Peggy Ryan in The Guiding Light, CBS-TV, 12:45 P.M.— 
CBS Radio, 1 :45 P.M.— M-F, for Ivory and Duz. (All EDT) 



51 




Television's excellent 
"one-night stands" play to 
the greatest audience on earth 




Kraft Television Theater. Left: Curtis James as the witch doctor, Ossie Davis as the emperor, and Everett Sloane as the "trader" 
in a colorful scene from Eugene O'Neill's noted drama, "Emperor Jones." Right: Celebrating its eighth anniversary as the first 
and oldest TV dramatic hour, Kraft featured Harry Townes, Elizabeth Eraser and John Cassavetes in "Judge Contain's Hotel." 





Ford Theater. Left: Franchot Tone, Laroine Day 
and- Natalie Wood star in "Too Old for Dolls." 
Above: Kathryn Grant in "Touch of Spring." 





U. S. Steel Hour (now on CBS-TV): Kenny Delnnar, Josephine 
Hull ond Wally Cox in "The Meanest Man in the World." 



Studio One Summer Theater: John Forsythe and Nita 
Talbot in "Operation Honne," slated for the movies. 



TV theater close-up 



TEN YEARS AGO, the idea of bringing plays of Broadway 
caliber into American homes via television was a 
far-fetched dream — possible, perhaps, but most 
improbable. Even five years ago, although great strides 
had been made, TV was still in the knee-pants stage. 
The pioneer dramatic programs of today — such as Kraft 
TV Theater, Studio One, Philco TV Playhouse— vjere 
then in their infancy. Television, like any growing 
child, still had to seek its guidance and dependence from 
a parent — Hollywood. But today the shoe is on the 
other foot. Hollywood's former attitude of condescension 
and indifference has changed to one of respect — and 
gratitude. For the film world has recognized television 
for what it is: a tremendous and unlimited source of 
creativeness. Hollywood can thank TV for stars such 
as Eva Marie Saint, James Dean, Charlton Heston, 
Jack Lemmon, who got their first "breaks" in video. And 
to TV goes the credit for such movies as "Little 
Boy Lost," "Marty" and the forthcoming "Patterns" 
and "The Catered Affair." 

The list of fine dramatic TV programs is as long 
as it is varied. Granddaddy of them all is Kraft 
TV Theater, which debuted May 7, 1947. Kraft also 
has the distinction of being the first commercial 
network show, first to be carried on the Midwest cable, 
first to prepare a drama for a color telecast, and first 
to present 104 full-hour live drama productions in one 
year (on two networks) . The following year, 1948, 
Studio One made its bow and, during its seven-year 
run, has consistently presented outstanding performers 
in excellent productions ranging from opera and 

See Next Page m 




Philco TV Ployhouse: Thelnna Ritter, Kathleen Maguire, 
Pat Henning, Pat O'Malley in "The Catered Affair." 



53 




TV theater close-up 



{Continued) 



ballet to comedies and fantasies, melodramas and 
documentaries. In 1949, Philco TV Playhouse 
entered the TV picture and immediately distinguished 
itself by presenting "Dinner at Antoine's," the first 
TV adaptation of a full-length novel. By 1950, Robert 
Montgomery Presents was in full swing, presenting an 
unusual variety of original and adapted stories and 
providing a debut center for celebrities and unknowns. In 
more recent years, as the number of viewers has grown 
to be the greatest audience on earth, those behind the 
scenes have striven to present bigger and better 
productions to match the magnitude of that audience. 
Climax, U. S. Steel Hour, Lux Video Theater, The Hall- 
mark Hall Of Fame are but a few fine examples. 
And — whereas, in previous years, summer was considered 
a slack season — this year the powers-that-be have 
taken a bold step and have continued to give viewers 
first-rate fare throughout the warm months. 

Pictured on these pages are stars and scenes from 
leading TV dramatic programs which can be seen the year 
'round. Many of the lead players are top Hollywood 
stars — ^Dane Clark, Ruth Roman, Thelma Ritter, Mary 
Astor. Others have distinguished themselves on Broad- 
way — ^Josephine Hull, Eddie Albert, Franchot Tone, 
John Forsythe. Then there are those who, in addition 
to stage, radio and movie appearances, have established 
a definite and esteemed place for themselves in TV. 

Everett Sloane has behind him twenty-five years of 
acting experience. Leaving the University of Pennsylvania 
in his junior year, he studied at the Hedgerow Reper- 
tory Theater. Soon, he established himself in 
radio as a leading actor on such programs as Crime 
Doctor, Mr. Ace And Jane, Grand Central Station and, 
most recently, 21st Precinct. His many movie credits 



Robert Montgomery Summer Theater: Elizabeth Mont- 
gomery and John Newland, who is the show's director. 



General Electric Theater: Eddie Albert, Ruth Roman, Robert Armstrong and Dane Clark combine their years 
of experience on Broadway and in Hollywood to present the suspenseful drama, "Into the Night." 



54 





n 
I 



The Vise: High-tension dranna, British style, is presented weekly in films made in England and featuring 
numerous international stars. Above. Brenda Hogan and Kenneth hiaigh star in "Weekend Guest." 



include "The Desert Fox," "The Men" and "The Blue 
Veil," and on Broadway he was seen in "Room Service" 
and "A Bell for Adano." Television has consistently 
claimed him on all major programs, among them, Kraft 
TV Theater, Studio One and Front Row Center. 

John Newland started his stage career at 16 and, after 
many years as a singer and dancer in vaudeville, 
switched to serious acting and studied in New York. 
He has appeared on Broadway in "Lend an Ear" and 
"Ziegfeld Follies." In the past few years he has 
devoted his talents almost exclusively to television, 
most notably on Robert Montgomery Presents. 

Harry Townes, after a long run in Broadway's famous 
"Tobacco Road," spent four years at the Kennebunk 
Playhouse in Maine, appeared in other leading Broadway 
productions, such as "Finian's Rainbow," and starred 
in the movie, "Operation Manhunt." His consistently 
excellent performances on every major dramatic show, 
including Studio One, Kraft, and Pond's Theater, have 
made him a favorite of producers and viewers alike. 

Nita Talbot showed show-business promise from the 
time- she was three and entertained at parties. She 
was a Conover model in her teens, studied acting in New 
York and later with Charles Laugh ton. After a few 
unsatisfactory Hollywood roles she returned to New York 
and began concentrating on television. She created 
attention with her role as a dumb blonde in the Claudia 
series and has since proved her versatility in roles 
on Studio One and Goodyear TV Playhouse. 

At "^ Natahe Wood has behind her the experience of 
an aci ss twice her age. First winning acclaim in 
movies such as "Tomorrow Is Forever," "The Miracle on 
34th Street" and "The Blue Veil," she endeared herself 
to TV audiences as Paul Hartman's daughter in Pride 
Of The Family. Numerous other TV performances 
include leads in "Alice in Wonderland," Hollywood 
Opening Night and Ford Theater. 

With the presence of such performers as these, plus 
many others, new and old, whom TV has to offer, 
there can be no doubt of good things to come. 
And it seems quite certain that television, show-business' 
biggest "upstart," is now entering its own Golden Age. 




Front Row Center: Marion Ross and Mary Astor in a 
scene from stoge and screen hit, "Dinner at Eight." 



55 





To Frankie Laine, love of music is love of people . . . 

the enduring joys of friendship, family and faith 



56 



Jft 



^1 






The Laines are "really living" in their Dutch Colonial honie in California. Frankie's wife is lovely Nan Grey, and he's 
"Daddy" to Pom and Jan, I I and 12. That's Lucky, the family pet, with Frankle and the girls, beside the swimnning pool. 

By BUD GOODE 

FRANKiE Laine walked down the hall of a charitable 
home in Ferguson, Missouri. It was 1947, and 
Frank's popularity was riding the crest of his first 
big record hit, "That's My Desire." He and his 
accompanist, Carl Fischer, had driven to the charitable 
home from St. Louis to visit little Helen Maysey, a 
bedridden teenager. The attendant told Frank that 
Helen suffered from splenic anemia. Every three 
months, she had to go to the Christian Hospital in 
St. Louis for a transfusion — three to four pints of 
blood. The fresh supply of blood carried her through 
the next three months. The doctors knew little 
about her illness. She wasn't given much hope. 

Frank and Carl opened the door to Helen's small, 
cell-like room. The wall behind her bed was covered 
with Frankie Laine pictures. {Continued on page 98) 

The Frankie Laine Show replaces Arthur Godfrey And His Friends 
for 8 summer weeks, on CBS-TV, Wed., 8 P.M. EDT, sponsored by 
The Toni Company and by Frigidaire. See local newspapers 
for time and station of Frankie's TV program for Guild Films. 

Decorator Nan designed the Laines' unique dining table. The student's chair where Jan does her homework (assisted by 
Frankie) is one of the many antiques Nan has collected — as Is the marble-top dresser in Nan's and Frankie's bedroom. 





^p8* 




ti*{<>S^*|fe»ft»««Ji,' 





Tod Andrews conquered his shyness— and won even more 

than a stellar career in the TV drama. First Love 




By ED MEYERSON 



HE WAS SHY. He was sensitive. And, to make matters 
worse, his last name began with "A." This meant 
that, in all his classes at school, Tod Andrews had 
to sit in the first row — usually, the first seat — and in- 
variably, the teacher would call on him -first. Now, it 
wasn't that Tod didn't know the answer. He just didn't 



know how to get it out. Stuttering and stammering — 
his cheeks burning red with bashfulness — he could 
neither speak nor could he die on the spot. And the 
floor refused to swallow him up. 

It was Tod's mother who suggested that he enroll in 
a dramatics class to help get (Continued on page 80) 



58 



Help Yourself to Living 




The great satisfactions which hove come to Tod Andrews as an actor have been personal, rather than professional. It was 
through his stage roles that he met Gloria Folland, herself a successful actress. Now there's a young Tod Walter Andrews, 
aged three and red-headed. "Nothing shy about him," grins Tod — who, if he hadn't been shy, might not have turned actor! 





Tod and Gloria toured together in the play, "Mr. Roberts" 
— and got tips on real seamanship from Copt. Ralph Wilhelm, 
CO. of the USS Uvalde, and Lieut. Comm. Edward Fain (left). 



Tod Andrews is Zach James in First Love, by Manya Starr, on NBC-TV, 
M-F, 4:15 P.M. EDT. for Jergens-Woodbury Products and others. 



59 




I. Stanley Warrick agrees to pretend that Janice Bennett 
and he are engaged, as Stella challenges him with a test of 
whonn her daughter Laurel loves — him or her husband Dick. 



STELLA DALLAS smiled sadly to herself as she thought of 
the triangle of" mothers of which she was a part — 
of the three mature women struggling and striving 
to protect what each saw as the happiness of her child. 
SteUa wondered how much a mother should be allowed 
to interfere in her child's life and whether she had per- 
haps made the wrong move in her effort to protect her 
daughter Laurel against Mrs. Grosvenor and Ada Dex- 
ter. . . . From the very start, Mrs. Grosvenor has re- 
sented Laurel's marriage to her son, Dick Grosvenor. 
She has sneered at SteUa's humble sewing-shop back- 
ground and has always insisted that Laurel could never 
fit into the socialite life of the Grosvenors in their home 
on Boston's aristocratic Beacon Hill. Nevertheless, Stella 
encouraged the love Laurel and Dick felt for each other, 
watched it grow into a happy marriage despite their 
different backgrounds, and has fought to preserve this 
love against Mrs. Grosvenor's interference. . . . Stella 



Pictured here, as heard on the air, are: 

Stella Dallas Anne Elstner 

Laurel Grosvenor Vivian Smolen 

Dick Grosvenor Bert Cowlan 

Stanley Warrick Alastair Duncan 

Janice Bennett Millicent Brower 

Mrs. Grosvenor Ara Gerald 

Stella Dallas is heard over NBC Radio, M-F, at 4:15 P.M. EDT, 
for Bayer Aspirin, Phillips' Milk of Magnesia, other products. 




2. Laurel had turned to Stanley because of Dick's neglect 
and, as she pleads with Stanley to confess that his engage- 
ment is a joke, Stella fears Stanley nnay give away the plan. 



knows that Dick and Laurel are right for each other, but 
she is also aware of Dick's weakness — of the way he has 
always followed his mother's lead and has never been 
able to offer her any strong opposition. His marriage to 
Laurel had been Dick's one real rebellion against Mrs. 
Grosvenor. But, since the marriage, Dick has failed to 
stand up to his mother's constant attacks on Laurel and 
this has made Laurel confused and uncertain. . . . Thus, 
when Stanley Warrick comes along to pay her the 
compliments and attentions which Dick has neglected. 
Laurel cannot help but be attracted to him. Stanley's 
mother, the extremely wealthy, but mentally unbalanced 
Ada Dexter, adores Laurel. When her long-missihg son, 
Stanley, was returned to her, Ada became obsessed with 
the idea of Stanley's marrying Laurel, thus, in effect, 
making Laurel her daughter. At Ada's suggestion, Stan- 
ley began to pursue Laurel, and Ada had been overjoyed 
when Stanley actually fell deeply in love with Laurel — 
and when Laurel, too, seemed to share his feelings. 
. . . But Stella has seen Laurel's response to Stanley for 
what it really is — a reaction to her present unha^jpiness 



60 




\^ir 



/ 



^ 






# 




s 



3. Stellos plan_ works in that Laurel end Dick return together to the Srosvenors' Beacon Hill home, but Stella con see that 
the reconciliation is not a truly happy one. Dick cannot resist taunting Laurel over the manner in which Stanley seems to 
have toyed with her, then cast her aside, and Laurel is deeply wounded by his jibes and his mother's continued hostility. 

See Next Pagem 



61 




4. Laurel's marriage to Dick has foundered because he has 
failed to stand up for her against his socialite nnother, who 
has always felt Laurel's background makes her "unsuitable." 




5. Stella learns that Laurel, hurt and bewildered 
by Dick's attitude, has begun to see Stanley again. 
Heartsick, Stella fears that her plan may backfire. 



(Continued) 



with Dick. Stella, in searching frantically for a way to 
bring Laurel to her senses, finally found an ally in Janice 
Bennett, a young sociaUte who had been a customer of 
Stella's for many years. Janice suggested that, if Stanley 
were engaged to another girl, then 'Dick would no 
longer be jealous and Laurel could return to him. . . . 
At the time, this seemed hke a good idea to Stella. She 
had challenged Stanley to be "man enough" to leave 
Laurel alone, to pretend that he was engaged to Janice 
so that Laurel would be forced to try to forget him and 
resume her marriage with Dick. Stanley, convinced that 
Laurel really loved him and wanted to marry him, 
agreed with the plan — certain it would only prove to 
Stella that Laurel's feelings for him are genuine. Laurel 
is hurt when she hears of the engagement, and Dick dis- 
appoints Stella by looking upon Laurel condescendingly, 
simply as someone with whom Stanley toyed for a while, 
then cast aside when he met Janice. They decide on a 
reconciliation, but, on their return to the Beacon Hill 
house, Dick mocks Laurel for the way Stanley has 
treated her, and Mrs. Grosvenor puts a new viciousness 
into her attacks on her daughter-in-law. ... As for Ada 
Dexter, she is furious that her son could possibly prefer 
someone else to Laurel. She becomes wilder and wilder, 
and — between his mother's rage and Laurel's obvious 
hurt — Stanley is tempted to reveal that his engagement 
is a trick. Only his promise to Stella prevents him. . . . 
Then Dick and Janice meet — and are immediately 
attracted to each other. Janice, who finds herself falling 
in love with Dick, justifies her feelings by saying that 




6. At the sewing shop, Stella is shocked as Janice tells 
her that she loves Dick Grosvenor and that, since Laurel 
obviously prefers Stanley, they should "switch partners." 



62 




7. As Stanley watches S+elia, Laurel and Dick after the make-believe engagement has been revealed, he is certain that now 
it hos been proved that Laurel really loves him. But Stella is convinced that only stubborn pride keeps Laurel and Dick apart 
and she searches frantically for a way to avoid a divorce and then a re-moting of Stanley and Laurel, Dick and Janice. 



Dick and Laurel are plainly unhappy together. Mrs. 
Grosvenor is dehghted about Dick's attentions to Janice 
— who, to Mrs. Grosvenor's mind, is much more suitable 
a daughter-in-law than Laurel. . . . Stella becomes truly 
frantic, but she still refuses to allow Stanley to tell 
Laurel that the engagement is a hoax. She pleads with 
Stanley to do something to straighten out the tangle. But 
it is Janice who comes up with an idea. She decides that, 
since she wants to marry Dick, and Laurel wants to 
marry Stanley, they should simply "switch partners." 
Laurel and Dick can be divorced and then she and 
Dick, Laurel and Stanley, can be married. Mrs. Gros- 
venor is overjoyed, Ada Dexter is beyond herself with 
delight, Dick is easily led by Janice and, to Stanley, it is 
the perfect solution. . . . But Stella can only see it as an 
immoral plan and she is horrified by the scheme. Laurel 
is stunned. When Stanley declares that the changing of 
partners is actually Stella's idea, Stella denies it vigor- 



ously but she cannot seem to stop the momentum of 
Janice's scheme. . . . Stella's own plan, which started out 
as an attempt to reconcile Dick and Laurel, has turned 
into the greatest threat to Laurel's happiness. In the 
past, Stella has always shown wisdom in dealing with 
people and particularly in raising and protecting Laurel. 
Now she searches desperately for a solution to this 
present confusion. But where should she take her stand 
against two such powerful opponents as Ada Dexter and 
Mrs. Grosvenor — and against such a wily young schemer 
as Janice Bennett? What action can Stella take to help 
Dick and Laurel as they persist in being their own worst 
enemies? How can Stella help without being called "in- 
terfering"? . . . Somehow, in some manner, Stella knows 
that she must find a way to make Laurel's life once again 
peaceful and happy . . . for, as with all mothers, the 
happiness of her child is the greatest happiness Stella 
Dallas could ask for herself. 



63 



HE'S A BIG BOY NOW 



Julius La Rosa has grown steadily 

with his fame — as a man, as well as a star 




Julie and "his girls," The Debutones: Left to right — 
Sherry Ostrus, Irene Carroll, Bix Brent, Connie Desmond. 



By IRA H. KNASTER 

You HAVE a luncheon date with 
Julius La Rosa. The rendezvous is 
for half-past noon, at his office on 
Madison Avenue in the Fifties. 
You hop into a taxi, armed v^rith pen- 
cil, note paper, and several grains 
of salt — this latter item for the 
reason that your previous impressions 
of Julie are, shall we say, mixed. 
They've stemmed mainly from 
page-one headlines and the contra- 
dictory comments of this young 
singer's best friends and his severest 
critics. 

Being the painfully prompt type, 
you arrive (Continued on page 92) 

The Julius La Rosa Show is seen on CBS-TV, 
.M,W.F, 7:45 P.M. EDT. Julie al.so .stars on 
TV's Top Tunes, on CBS-TV, Sat., 10 P.M. 
EDT, as sponsored by Liggett & Myers To- 
iiacco Company for Chesterfield Cigarettes. 



Mixing business with pleosure, in his office high above Madison Avenue, Julie goes over scripts and scores with 
manager Frank Barone and publicist Beverly Browning — and plays a game of chess, his newest enthusiasm, with Barone. 






Bob Haymes, who has his own shows on WCBS, 
helps write and plan Julie's M-W-F programs. 



At home with his parents, Julie enjoys "the greatest cooking in the world" — his beloved Mom's. And his appetite 
for reading is equally great, with the accent on history, psychology, philosophy and "books on religious thought." 




HE'S A BIG BOY NOW 



Julius La Rosa has grown steadily 

with his fame — as a man, as tvell as a star 




Julie and "his girls," The Debutones: Lett to right — 
Sherry Ostrus, Irene Carroll. Bix Brent, Connie Desmond. 



By IRA H. KNASTER 

You HAVE a luncheon date with 
Julius La Rosa. The rendezvous is 
for half-past noon, at his office on 
Madison Avenue in the Fifties. 
You hop into a taxi, armed with pen- 
cil, note paper, and several grains 
of salt — this latter item for the 
reason that your previous impressions 
of Julie are, shall we say, mixed. 
They've stemmed mainly from 
page-one headlines and the contra- 
dictory comments of this young 
singer's best friends and his severest 
critics. 

Being the painfully prompt type, 
you arrive (Continued on page 92 ) 

The Juliics La Rosa Shoiv is seen on CBS-TV. 
M.W.F, 7:4.5 P.M. EDT. Julie also stars on 
TVs Top Tunes, on CBS-TV, Sat., 10 P.M. 
EDT, as sponsored by Liggett & Myers To- 
hacro (■om|iany for Chesterfield Cigarettes. 




Mixing business with pleasure, in his office high obove Madison Avenue, Julie goes over scripts and scores with 
nnonaqer Frank Barone and publicist Beverly Browning— and plays a gome of chess, his newest enthusiasm, with Barone. 




Bob Haymes, who has his own shows on WCBS, 
helps write and plan Julie's M-W-F programs. 




At home with his parents, Julie enjoys "the greatest cooking in the world"— his beloved Mom's. And his appetite 
for reading is equally great, with the accent on history, psychology,' philosophy and "books on religious thought." 






Even before the baby came, Lois and Morton Hunt 
checked college catalogues for future registration! 



Ihiiliililiiidi 



Nursery furniture was a more immediate problem, so they 
"scouted" the Liliputian Bazaar in Best's Fifth Avenue store. 



LOIS HUNT'S LULLABY 

It's her very own song, to her very 
own baby— the high note of a singing 
life which has unfolded like a dream 

By GLADYS HALL 



SOMETIMES, in the drama of daily living, there are 
emotions so deep that they can be expressed only 
in the lines of the greatest poets ... such lines as: 
Happy, he 

With such a mother! Faith in womankind 
Beats with his hlood, and trust in all things high 
Comes easy for him; and tho' he trip and fall 
He shall not blind his soul with clay . . . 
This lovely tribute to motherhood appears in Tenny- 
son's "The Princess" . . . and also on the title page of 
Lois Hunt's copy of Bahy and Child Care, by Dr. Ben- 
jamin Spock. They were inscribed there by Lois's 
husband, magazine writer Morton Hunt, during those 
ecstatic months when Lois and Morton were awaiting 
the birth of their first child. To them, Morton added 



this tribute of his own: "And who ever thought that 
the girl I love would be — somebody's mother?" 

"Mort," Lois observes, "always finds the appropriate 
thing to say, at the appropriate time, and his postscript 
to Tennyson's lines was especially apt. After being 
married for eight and a half years — and no baby — who 
would have thought . . . !" Her brilliant brown eyes 
widen at the wonder of it all. 

"Actually, Mort was not surprised," she laughs, "not 
the least bit. I was not obliged to whisper my sweet 
secret into his reddening ear. Nor was it revealed to 
him by the unexpected sight of me knitting a tiny 
garment — I didn't knit any, because everything I knit 
turns out to be a scarf! We knew the wonderful truth 
even before the doctor told us. That made it nice, 



66 



Continued 



> 





Lois can't knit well, but Robert Q. Lewis, her boss, is a whiz 
with the needles and offered to help with the "tiny garments." 



As Lois continued working on his shows, bachelor 
Bob mode sure she got plenty of milk and vitamins. 



Morton and Lois don't ogree with Shakespeare! They think there's a lot in a name and compiled quite a list — just in case. 





Both took the Red Cross course for parents- 
to-be, conducted by Elizabeth J. Tlernan, R.N. 




LOIS HUNT'S LULLABY 

{Continued) 



too . . . made the secret — for a time, at least — ours alone. 
The important thing for us is that, when we were first mar- 
ried, we both felt the same way about having a baby . . . not 
feeling secure enough, since our professions are both so un- 
predictable. Then we both matured at the same time and 
wanted a baby so much that this has been a very happy time 
indeed. 

"Everyone has been happy about it . . . very much including 
Robert Q. Lewis, who had been teasing Jaye P. Morgan and 
me for months, asking one of us — ^preferably both — to please 
have a baby! When I told him that I was, he was just 
delighted, tickled pink. He started knitting tiny garments," 
Lois laughs. "Actually, he just took needles and wool in 
hand as a gag for the photographers. But Robert Q. really 
can knit, he does knit, and he promised me 'a dozen hand- 
knit diapers' . . . which, I must reproalchfuUy add, have not — 
unlike the baby — been delivered as yet! 

"In any other medium in which I've ever worked — in opera, 
on the concert stage — I would have been obliged to quit in 
the fifth month of my pregnancy, because of the demands 
which opera and concert make upon my voice. On any other 
television show except the Robert Q. Lewis Show, I probably 
would not have been welcome after the fifth month. But 
Robert Q. — feeling the way he did — made it cozy and com- 
fortable for me to go on working up to a very few weeks 
before my confinement. His show is a family type of show, 
anyway, and the audience realizes it, feeling that they, too, are 
part of the family. This was proven to me in the warmest, 
friendliest way. After Robert Q. announced on the air that 
Morton arid I were expecting an addition to our family, I 
received literally thousands of cards and was up to here in 
bootees! {Continued on page 94) 



The Robert Q. Lewis Show, seen on CBS-TV, M-F, 2 P.M. EDT, is spon- 
sored by Helene Curtis Industries (Spray Net, Lanolin Discovery, Sham- 
poo Plus Egg), Miles Laljoratories, Inc. (makers of Alka-Seltzei') , General 
Mills (Betty Crocker Cake Mixes), Johnson's Wax, Mazola, Viceroy 
Cigarettes, and other products. The Robert Q. Lewis Show, heard on CBS 
Radio, Sat., II A.M. EDT, is sponsored by Perma-Starch, S-7, and others. 



Required reading for the Hunts: Baby and Child Care — the book which Morton lovingly inscribed to Lois in the days 
of waiting. They really had fun decorating the nursery, and Lois proved her theories about chic "maternity" styles. 



k 



68 




A Very Good Neighbor 

{Continued jrom page 30) 
in this is proved by the fact that Dennis 
is probably the only emcee in television 
who invariably gets a big hand for his 
Bromo-Seltzer commercials. 

One reason for Dennis' infectious good 
nature and superb salesmanship is his 
complete sincerity and warmth. He ob- 
viously enjoys hirnself fully as much as his 
audience, and he becomes completely ab- 
sorbed in whatever he does. For instance, 
to this day he recalls as his toughest as- 
signment one given to him a couple of 
years after the war. when he had to meet 
a boat returning from Europe with six 
hundred war dead. It was the kind of 
beautiful spring day on which he'd nor- 
mally have felt like jumping with the sheer 
joy of Uving. But, once aboard ship, he 
became terribly saddened and depressed 
by the thought of his buddies in the hold 
going to a final resting place in American 
soil. Under the circumstances, he couldn't 
comment on the beauties of the New York 
skyline coming into view, on the bustle 
of the harbor, the bright blue of the sky. 
or the deeper tone of the sea. He was be- 
fore mike and camera for an hour and a 
half, and— when it was over — felt limp 
and drained of all energy. Though he's 
since been on many telethons on behalf 
of the United Cerebral Palsy Association 
— for sixteen hours straight— he considers 
the other by far the hardest task he's 
ever had to tackle. 

On the other hand, the most fun he's ever 
had was when he used to handle the com- 
mentary on wrestling bouts, which were 
the steady fare of early TV programming. 
Knowing next to nothing about the sport, 
he got himself a manual, brushed up on 
some of the terms, and then proceeded to 
address himself to an audience who pre- 
sumably knew even less about wrestling 
than he did — the American housewife. In 
line with his bent for keeping his chatter 
direct and warm, he picked out one house- 
wife particularly dear to his heart — his 
mother, explaining to her what w^as going 
on in the ring. This approach brought him 
a vast new public, a good deal of money, 
and enduring fame. 

Also, during this period, Dermis devel- 
oped his technique of on-the-spot rhym- 
ing. This had its origin when a wres- 
tler by the name of Gino Garibaldi was 
thrown clear of the ring by his opponent. 
"He's been thrown out, but he'll come 
back — and, when he does, their heads will 
crack," Dennis commented, and he was 
almost instantly rewarded by seeing his 
prediction come true. 

His rhymed narration soon became im- 
mensely popular, but poetry backfired 
when a wrestler named Tarzan Hewitt 
didn't Uke the terse verse: "Look at the 
suet on Tarzan Hewitt." Tarzan later 
sneaked up on Dennis and put a hammer - 
lock on him that nearly broke his arm. 

Dennis, never one to run away from a 
fight, retaliated by further taunts. Soon 
a regular feud developed between them 
and — as a consequence — matrons by the 
hundreds began attending wrestling 
matches in person, armed with baseball 
bats and frying pans. Dennis has referred 
to them as his private '"Housewives' Pro- 
tective League." 

The affection with which millions of 
women regard Dennis James, "every- 
body's favorite neighbor," has little to do 
with his wavy hair and good looks but 
seems to be the result of some special ap- 
peal that has wrought its charm ever since 
he was in his cradle. While both Dennis 
and his mother stoutly deny that he was 
the family favorite, there is at least cir- 
cumstantial evidence that he was on the 




ill reall y lovely to love? 



...Ts there an ' 
J- # 

air of freshness 
about you . . . always ? 




You'll be fresh as a daisy, even on hot humid 
days— when you use Fresh Cream Deodorant! 
Prove it to yourself this way : 

Buy a jar of Fresh today. Use Fresh under 
one arm and continue your present deodorant 
under the other arm for a few days. 

See for yourself which prevents odor best 
—keeps underarms drier— protects clothing 
better . . . makes you sure you have an air 
of freshness always. 

iJ^l£^ is a registered trademark of Pharma-Craf t Corporation. 
Also manxifactured and distributed in Canada. 




"Jfleih is extra effective — contains the 
most eflfective perspiration-checking 
ingredient known. Gentle to skin . . . 
creamy smooth, not sticky or greasy. 
Delicately fragrant. Use daily. 



a fflJlAt^ girl is always lovely to love 



69 



receiving end of plenty of love and af- 
fection. He was the baby of the Sposa fam- 
ily, the youngest of three sons born to 
Teresa and Demetrio Sposa. His father 
immigrated from Italy as a boy, settled in 
Jersey City, New Jersey, started out as a 
carpenter's helper, worked himself up to 
become a contractor, and has since retired 
on his savings to live in Florida. He takes 
great pride in having been able to send 
Dennis through college. 

Dennis' mother recalls how all the 
neighbors used to oh-and-ah when she 
wheeled him down the street. "He was a 
beautiful baby," she says. "Never gave us 
a minute of trouble." 

There wasn't too much money around 
the house when Dennis was a child, and he 
learned early that he had to work for his 
spending money. But that never was very 
difficult for Dennis, who seems to have 
been born with the knack for making 
friends. Making deliveries for Tony's meat 
market in the neighborhood, Dennis' smile 
and his helpfulness earned him a rich har- 
vest in tips, cookies, and general good will. 
"Dennis was the best boy who's ever 
worked for me," says Tony Cantrella, his 
old ex-boss. "He brought lots of cus- 
tomers into the store." Aside from deliv- 
ering meat, Dennis could always be 
counted on to climb through narrow win- 
dows when Mrs. Murphy had locked herself 
out of the house, to rescue Mrs. Poletti's 
baby from a deserted cellar, or to lend a 
hand with a heavy laundry basket. 

A little later, Dennis found another way 
to earn his allowance. A husky youngster 
with good coordination and lightning re- 
flexes, he develooed considerable skill with 
his fists at the "Y." When he was asked to 
fill in a card at a local boxing club one 
Saturday evening, he won the bout and 
was given a stale cake for a prize. "When 
I brought it home. Dad gave me another 
workout," Dennis recalls with a smile. "He 
was very disappointed that I should have 
so little sense as to let myself be knocked 
around for nothing but a stale cake. He 
didn't calm down till I had a chance to cut 
it open and show him the twenty-dollar 
bill inside it. The cake was just to protect 
my amateur standing." In college, Dennis 
subsequently became middleweight box- 
ing champion. 

Planning to become a doctor, Dennis at- 
tended St. Peter's College, in Jersey City, 
as a pre-med student and, upon graduation, 
won admission to a medical school. How- 
ever, being a doctor wasn't what Dennis 
really wanted. All through his school years, 
he'd been extremely active in amateur 
theatricals, debating clubs and similar 
projects, and he felt a terrific urge to get 
before a microphone and make his living 
by talking to people, instead of doctoring 



them. Nowadays, whenever he feels a 
twinge of regret that he didn't become a 
doctor, he consoles himself with the 
thought that he probably contributes as 
much to keeping millions of people well by 
making them smile as he would by treat- 
ing a few hundred patients. 

As for his dramatic urge, Dennis freely 
admits that he's been something of a ham 
as far back at he can remember. "Nobody 
ever had to egg me on to do my stuff," he 
says. "Even in grammar school, I used to 
recite long poems at the drop of a buskin. 
One of my standbys was 'Over the Hill to 
the Poorhouse.' I'd get down on my knees 
and really emote. And I wasn't satisfied 
unless I could wring a few tears out of the 
mothers in the audience." 

Tears, along with smiles, are still part of 
many of Dennis' shows. People win jack- 
pots on other give-away shows without 
biirsting out crying, but there's something 
in the way Dennis brings out a story of 
sorrow, heartache and need that invariably 
moves viewers and participants alike to 
tears. Dennis likes people, and his gen- 
uine kindliness and concern make them 
respond in kind. "Oh, you're just grand," 
is the way one elderly lady spontaneously 
put it the other day, after winning two 
thousand dollars in On Your Account — 
and before bursting into tears of gratitude. 
And Dennis' heavy fan mail echoes this 
sentiment. 

It was, perhaps characteristically, a 
woman. Miss Bernice Judis — then the 
fabulous manager of the New York's fabu- 
lously successful independent Station 
WNEW — who gave Dennis his first break 
in big-time radio. Also characteristically, 
it was the result of a fluff which he'd 
turned into a joke. 

Though still planning officially to enter 
medical school in the fall, Dennis took a 
course in radio announcing at an evening 
school in New York during the summer 
following his graduation from college. 
Diuring the day, in order to meet expenses, 
he worked as a salesman for Abercrombie 
& Fitch. Both of his intended careers, inci- 
dentally, were almost shelved by his suc- 
cess in this job. Discovering a "sleeper" 
in a theretofore slow-moving item — an 
infra-red lamp used to destroy ticks, fleas 
and other vermin on pets — he became so 
impressed with the lamp's possibilities that 
he sold a hundred of them in one day. 
Equally impressed, the manufacturer 
hired him as assistant sales manager at a 
salary of $125 a week plus $100 for ex- 
penses — a pretty fair haul for a kid fresh 
out of college, especially in the lean days 
of 1938. Nevertheless, shortly thereafter, 
when he was offered a chance to do a disc- 
jockey show on Jersey City's WAAT, 
Dennis unhesitatingly bade adieu to both 



OCTOBER'S "BETTER HALF " 

Femme stars shine brightly in our next feature-filled, picture-packed issue: 

ARLENE FRANCIS • ROSEMARY CLOONEY • KATHY GODFREY 

JEAN HAGEN of The Danny Thomas Show 

MARION RANDALL of Valiant Lady 

ROSEMARY DeCAMP of The Bob Cummings Show 

PEG LYNCH of Ethel and Albert (ALAN BUNCE is "the other half." of course) 

OCTOBER 
TV RADIO MIRROR • on sale September 6 



70 



medicine and sales as possible careers. 

"I was scared to tell my parents about 
my decision," he recalls. "They'd made so 
many sacrifices to send me through col- 
lege, and I knew they had their hearts set 
on my becoming a doctor. I hated to dis- 
appoint them. It shows what wonderful 
people they are that they raised no ob- 
jections. 'If that's what you want to do, 
go ahead,' Dad said. 'I'll do all I can to 
help you.' " 

Dennis, as it turned out, didn't need any 
help. Though he took the job at WAAT at 
no pay, he soon acquired sponsors, came 
to the attention of Miss Judis during his 
first season, and transferred to WNEW the 
following spring. He was earning a very 
nice living indeed, for a young man, when 
he was hit by the television bug. A total 
of only some three hundred sets, all of 
them experimental, were in existence at 
the time. For Dennis, television in those 
days meant a lot of hard work at very 
little money. But he was fascinated by the 
medium, had enough vision to foresee its 
possibilities, and was determined to stay 
with it. Today he is less proud of having 
been one of the first men to appear before 
a television camera than of the fact that 
he's still around and going strong. 

"Being a pioneer is all very well," he 
says, "but their usual fate is to fall by the 
wayside, once a new thing gets going and 
the big boys come in. The trick is simply 
to 'stay alive,' especially in a medium as 
insecure and fickle as television." 

Despite a considerable income, continu- 
ing popularity and the unabated demand 
for his services by sponsors and networks, 
Dennis admits that he is aware of the con- 
stant pressure and doesn't feel completely 
secure to this day. "Success in this busi- 
ness depends on too many factors beyond 
your control," he explains. "You never 
know what is going to happen from one 
thirteen-week period to the next. People 
read about fabulous contracts, but they fail 
to realize that these bind only the per- 
former, not the network. Once you feel 
you've got it made, that's when you usu- 
ally start sliding." 

While Dennis is aware of the pitfalls, 
he has, nevertheless, the happy faculty of 
not letting it worry him. "I'm doing the 
best I can each day, six days a week. That's 
all anybody can do. Once you allow your- 
self to be upset by the constant pressure, 
you're liable to wind up in the hospital." 

One reason for Dennis' relative peace of 
mind is his matchless versatility. With the 
exception of conjuring, there's practically 
nothing he hasn't done — and done well — 
before the TV cameras, from straight com- 
mercials to straight drama. Another, and 
perhaps a far more powerful reason, 
though, is his exceptionally happy mar- 
riage. 

The story of how he met his wife Micki, 
in Florida, while he was recuperating from 
a throat operation and unable to talk — 
forced to rely exclusively on scribbled 
notes and a subtropical moon — has been 
told often. Begun in silence, their romance 
has grown into serene contentment at 
having found each other and being at 
peace with the world. 

Micki, the former Marjorie Crawford, 
is a beautiful and sensitive girl who tends 
to be quiet and retiring, while Dennis is 
outgoing and hearty. During the three 
and a half years of their marriage, both 
have made compromises and achieved a 
happy balance. As Dennis puts it, "We 
each try to consider the other's happiness 
first." 

Micki, who used to be a commercial ar- 
tist, is a talented painter who has sparked 
Dennis' interest in painting to where it is 
now his most absorbing hobby. They paint 
on a double easel in a spacious studio on 
the second floor of their home overlooking 



Long Island Sound, in New Rochelle, New 
York. And that beautiful house of theirs 
is another enthusiastic interest they share. 
Still others including: Taking and editing 
films, for which Dennis supplies the nar- 
ration; boating; and their two-year-old 
boxer. Candy. Dennis also does a lot of 
wood-working with power tools, following 
plans designed by Micki. 

Micki, on the other hand, has learned 
to take in her stride aU that's required of 
the wife of a man who's as famovis, popular 
and successful as Dennis. A superb hostess 
in her own home, she's equally gracious 
and charming at a party or reception given 
by others and has no difficulty mixing with 
people in aU walks of life. 

The Jameses have no children of then- 
own as yet, but have virtually adopted 
thousands of others — the unfortunate vic- 
tims of cerebral palsy. Dennis became 
aware of the problem almost accidentally, 
when he was asked to pose for a publicity 
photo on behalf of the United Cerebral 
Palsy Association. Holding the quivering 
body of a spastic little girl in his arms did 
something to him. From that moment on, 
he's given unstintingly of his time and 
energy to help raise funds necessary for 
the long and costly retraining and rehabili- 
tation of afflicted youngsters. Over the past 
couple of years, he's presided over more 
than a dozen telethons, each lasting for 
sixteen uninterrupted hours. And, while 
Dennis is before the cameras, Micki is at 
the switchboard, sparing herself no less 
than her husband does. "The biggest re- 
ward we have," Dennis says, "is to hear a 
little girl talk, who a year before could 
only stammer — or see a Uttle boy walk, 
who couldn't get out of his wheelchair be- 
fore." 

Another share of the unspent love in 
their hearts goes to their dog. Candy, who 
was given them by Dennis' brother, Lou. 
"Candy was the runt of the litter," Micki 
relates. "Lou couldn't understand why we 
wanted her instead of one of the other, 
sturdier pups. She was so puny, weak and 
trembling tiiey called her Shaky. Maybe 
that's why Dennis and I fell in love with 
her. Today, she's a real beauty, though, 
and the gentlest dog aUve." 

"And the smartest one, too," Dennis 
adds. "That dog seems to vmderstand 
everything, even spelling. She'll obey 
speUed-out commands, as well as words." 

The Jameses have many friends whom 
they love to entertain. Closest among them 
are the Herb Shriners, who are neigh- 
bors and also live in a house at the water's 
edge. When they want to drop in on each 
other for a neighborly visit, they take the 
boat. "It's a little complicated, when you 
just want to borrow a couple of eggs and 
a cup of sugar, but it's fun," Micki says. 

For a long time, boating has been one 
of Dennis' great passions, and it's one Micki 
has learned to appreciate in turn. During 
the summer, they spend much of their 
leisure time cruising on the water, and 
this summer Dennis even considered com- 
muting to town by boat, instead of train. 

Still a young man despite his sixteen 
years in television, Dennis isn't apt to give 
much thought to the future. He likes what 
he's doing and hopes to keep busy at it 
for a long time to come. Though retire- 
ment seems to be a long way ofE, Dennis 
and Micki have still given it some thought. 
"Micki and I, we're really both small-town 
folks at heart," Dennis says. "We have our 
eyes on a nice spot in Florida. Someday, 
that's going to be home for us." 

With all their interests to keep them 
b\isy, chances are they won't get bored. 
But, when they do pack up and head 
South, TV won't be the same any more. 
Not without "everybody's favorite neigh- 
bor." 



a world of ENTERTAINMENT! 




GARBO to MONROE 



BING to GARY CROSBY 



BENNY to GOBEL 



TUCKER to CLOONEY 



STARLAND 



AT NEWSSTANDS NOW 



Picture-packed, star-studded STARLAND takes 
you into the Show Business World — 
MOVIES. TV. RADIO and RECORDS 

158 Biographies, 274 intimate Pictures, 
174 Stories of Your Favorites, Latest 
News Events in the Show Business World 



YOU'LL SEE STARS! 

Harry Belafonte 
Jaye P. Morgan 
Clark Gable 
Mary Martin 
Sannmy Davis Jr. 



Judy Holliday 
Humphrey Bogart 
Eartha Kitt 
Eddie Arnold 
Sheree North 



If STARLAND is not avail- 
able at your newsstand, please 
mail this coupon and 50^ 



I MAIL COUPON TODAY j 

STARLAND RM-955 

205 E. 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Send me postoaid, a copy of STARLAND. 
I enclose 50c. 



Name. 



Please Print 



Address. 



City. 



.State. 



71 



I 



nside Radio 

All Times Listed Are Eastern Daylight Time. 



Monday through Friday 



NBC 
Morning Programs 



MBS 



ABC 



CBS 



8:30 
8:45 




Local Program 


John MacVane 




9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 




Robert Hurleigh 
Easy Does It 
News, Cecil Brown 
9:35 Easy Does It 
(con.) 


Breakfast Club 


News Of America 


10:00 

10:15 
10:30 

10:45 


Mary Margaret 

McBride 
10:05 Norman 

Vincent Peato 
One Man's FamUj? 
Second CItance 

Break The Bank 


Cecil Brown 

Guest Time* 
News 

10:35 Johnny 
Olsen Show 


My True Story 

10:25 Whispering 
Streets 

When A Girl Marries 


Arthur Godfrey Time 


11:00 

11:15 

11:30 
11:45 


Strike it Rich 

Plirase That Pajs 
Fibber McGee & 
Molly 


Mutual Morning 

11:25 Holland Engle 
Oueen For A Day 

*Wed., Faith In 
Our Time 


Companion- 
Dr. Mace 
Paging The New 

Albert Warner, News 
Your Neighbor's 
Voice 


Arthur Godfrey 
(con.) 

Make Up Your Mind 
Second Husband 



Afternoon Programs 



12:00 




Noon News 
12:05 Down At 


Valentino 


Wendy Warren & 
The News 


12:15 




Holmesy's 


Frank Farrell 


Backstage Wife 


12:30 








Helen Trent 


12:45 








Our Gal Sunday 


1:00 




News, Cedric Foster 


Paul Harvey, News 


Road Of Life 


1:15 




Luncheon At Sardi's 


Ted Malone 


Ma Perkins 


1:30 


Pauline Frederick 


Letter To Lee 




Young Dr. Malone 


1:45 




Graham 




The Guiding Light 


2:00 




Luncheon With 




Second Mrs. Burton 


2:15 




Lopez 
2:25 News, Sam 




Perry Mason 


2:30 




Hayes 


Martin Block 


This Is Nora Drake 


2:45 








The Brighter Day 


3:00 


News 


Ruby Mercer Show 


Martin Block (con.) 


Linkletter's House 


3:15 


3:05 WoR^erfur City 






Party 


3:30 


Spotlight Storw 
Just Plain Bill) 






Fred Rabbins Show 


3:45 








4:00 


Right To Happiness 


Bruce & Dan 


Broadway Matinee 




4:15 


Stella Dallas 








4:30 


Young Widder Brown 


Tex Fletcher's 


Chautauqua Student 


Treasury Bandstand 


4:45 


Pepper Young's 


Wagon Show 


Symphony, Mon.; 






Family 




Treasury Band- 
stand, Tues.-Fri. 


4:55 News 


5:00 


Woman in My House 


Sgt. Preston 


Musical Express 




5:15 


Lorenzo Jones 




Bobby Hammack 




5:30 


Lone Ranger 


Bobby Benson 


Gloria Parker 




5:45 


5:55 Dan'l Boone 


America's Business 
5:50 Wismer, Sports 
5:55 Cecil Brown 


Vincent Lopez 





6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 



8:00 

8:15 
8:30 
8:45 



6:00 



9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



Monday 



Three Star Extra 



Alex Dreier, Man 

On The Go 
News Of The World 
One Man's Family 



Your Land And Mine 
Berkshire Festival 



Telephone Hour 



Band Of America 



Fibber McGee & 

Molly 
Hollywood Bowl 

Concerts 



Evening Programs 



ABC Reporter 



Local Program 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 
Gabriel Heatter 
In The Mood 



Top Secret Files 
Broadway Cop 



News, Lyie Van 
9:05 Footnotes to 

History 
Spotlight Story 
Reporters' Roundup 



Virgil Pinkley 

Orchestra 
Distinguished Artists 



Bill Stern, Sports 
George Hicks, News 



Vandercook, News 

Quincy Howe 

Strange 

Saga 

7:55 News 



Red Benson's 

Hideaway 
8:25 News 
Voice Of Firestone 



Music Tent 



9:25 News 
Freedom Sings 

9:55 News 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
How To Fix It 
Martha Lou Harp 



Jackson & The News 



Lowell Thomas 



Scoreboard 
7:05 Tennessee 

Ernie 
Edward R. Murrow 



Mr. Keen, Tracer 
Of Lost Persons 
8:25 Doug Edwards 
Arthur Godfrey's 
Talent Scouts 



Rosemary Clooney 



Bing Crosby 

Amos 'n' Andy Music 

Hall 
9:55 News 



Scoreboard 
10:05 Dance 
Orchestra 



Tuesday 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 



8:00 

8:15 
8:30 
8:45 



9:00 



9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



NBC 



Three Star Extra 



Evening Programs 

MBS ABC 



Alex Dreier, 

Man On The Go 
News Of The World 
One Man's Family 



People Are Funny 
Dragnet 



Biographies In 
Sound 



9:55 News 



Fibber McGee & 

Molly 
Heart Of The News 
New England Survey 



Local Program 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 
Gabriel Heatter 
Eddie Fisher 



Treasury Agent 



John Steele, 
Adventurer 



News, LyIe Van 
9:05 Footnotes To 

History 
Spotlight Story 
Army Hour 



Virgil Pinkley 

Men's Corner 
Dance Music 



Bill Stern, Sports 



Vandercook, News 
Quincy Howe 
Strange 
Saga 



Scoreboard 
7:05 Tennessee 

Ernie 
Edward R. Murrovi 



Red Benson's 
Hideaway 

8:25 News 

Hideaway (con.) 
8:55 News 



Music Show 
9:25 E. D. Canham, 
News 

Platterbrains 

9:55 News 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
How To Fix It 
Take Thirty 



CBS 
Jackson & The Netl 

Lowell Thomas 



Suspense 

8:25 Doug Edward 
Disk Derby, 
Fred Bobbins 



Disk Derby (con.) 



Bing Crosby 
Amos 'n' Andy Mus 
Hall 



Scoreboard 
10:05 Dance 
Orchestra 



Wednesday 



Evening Programs 



7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 



6:00 
8:15 



8:30 
8:45 



9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



6:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



Three Star Extra 



Alex Dreier, 

Man On The Go 
News Of The World 
One Man's Family 



Conversation 



News 

8:35 College Quiz 
Bowl 



Best Of Groucho 

Truth Or 
Consequences 



7:00 
7:15 



7:30 
7:45 



1:00 



8:15 
8:30 



9:00 



9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



8:00 
6:15 
6:30 
6:45 



Fibber McGee & 

Molly 
Heart Of The News 
Keys To The Capital 



Thursday 



Three Star Extra 



Local Program 



Fulton Lewis 
Dinner Date 
Gabriel Heatter 
In The Mood 



Jr. 



True Detective 



Sentenced 



News, LyIe Van 
Spotlight Story 
Family Theater 



Alex Dreier, 
Man On The Go 

News Oif The World 
One Man's Family 



Roy Rogers 



Dr. Six Gun 



News 

9:05 X Minus One 



The Loser 
9:55 News 



7:00 
7:15 
7:30 
7:45 



8:00 

8:15 
8:30 
8:45 



9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 



10:00 



10:15 
10:30 



Fibber McGee & 

Molly 
Joseph C. Harsch 
Jane Pickens Show 



Friday 



Three Star Extra 



Virgil Pinkley 

Sounding Board 

Evening 

Local Program 



Bill stern, Sports 



Vandercook, News 
Quincy Howe 
Strange 
Saga 



Red Benson's 

Hideaway 
8:25 News 
Hideaway (con.) 

8:55 News 



Music Show 
9:25 News 
President's News 
Conference 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Behind The Iron 

Curtain 
Gabriel Heatter 
Eddie Fisher 



Official Detective 
I Am Brady Kaye 



News, LyIe Van 
9:05 Footnotes to 

History 
Spotlight Story 
State Of The Nation 



Virgil Pinkley 

Book Hunter 
Henry Jerome Orch. 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
Behind Iron Curtain 
Relaxin' Time 

Programs 



Bill Stern, Sports 



Jackson & The Nevf 
Lowell Thomas 



Scoreboard 
7:05 Tennessee 

Ernie 
Edward R. Murrow 



8:25 Doug Edwardsf 
Disk Derby, 
Fred Robbins 



I 



Disk Derby (con.) 
Bing Crosby 
Amos 'n' Andy Mus 
Hall 



Vandercook, News 
Quincy Howe 

Strange 
Saga 



Red Benson's 

Hideaway 
8:25 News 
Hideaway (con.) 
8:55 News 



Music Show 



9:25 News 
Rhythm On Parade 



9:55 News 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
How To Fix It 
Front & Center 



Scoreboard 

10:05 Newsmakers! 

Presidential Report 



Jackson & The Nei^ 
Lowell Thomas 



Scoreboard 
7:05 Tennessee 
Ernie 

Edward R. Murrowi 



The Whistler 

8:25 Doug Edward; 
Disk Derby, 
Fred Robbins 



Disk Derby (con.) 



Bing Crosby 
Amos 'n' Andy Mus 
Hall 



Alex Dreier, 

Man On The Go 
News Of The World 
One Man's Family 



National Radio 
Fan Club 



Radio Fan Club 
(con.) 



Ted Heath Orch. 
Stars In Action 



Evening Programs 

Local Program 

Bill Stern, Sports 



Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Dinner Date 
Gabriel Heatter 
In The Mood 



Counter-Spy 
City Editor 



News, LyIe Van 
9:05 Footnotes To 
History 



Virgil Pinkley 

Forbes Report 

London Studios 

Melodies 



Vandercook, News 
Quincy Howe 
Strange 
Saga 



Red Benson's 

Hideaway 
8:25 News 
Hideaway (con.) 
8:55 News 



Music Show 

A Treasury Of Music 



News, Edward P. 

Morgan 
How To Fix It 
Indoors Unlimited 



Scoreboard 
10:05 Dance 
Orchestra 



Jackson 8i The Neii 



Lowell Thomas 



Scoreboard 
7:05 Tennessee 

Ernie 
Edward R. Murrow 



Godfrey Digest 

8:25 Doug Edward) 
Disk Derby, 
Fred Robbins 



Disk Derby (con.) 
Bing Crosby 
Amos 'n' Andy Mu 
Hall 



Scoreboard 
10:05 Dance 
Orchestra 



I 



nside Radio 



Saturday 



NBC 



UBS 



ABC 



CBS 



Moi 

•:30 
8:45 


■nlng Programs 

world News Local Proeram 
Roundup 1 


Doug Browning 
Show 


News 


9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 


Farming Business 
Monitor 




No School 
Today 


News Of America 
Farm News 

Garden Gate 


10:00 

10:15 
10:30 
10:45 


Monitor 


American Travel 
Guide 


No School 
Today (con.) 

Breakfast Club 

Review 
10:55 News 


News 

10:05 Galen Drake 
Show 

10:55 News 


11:00 

11:15 
11:30 
11:45 


Monitor 


Lucky Pierre 

Johnny Desmond 

Show 
11:55 Young Living 


11 :05 Half-Pint 

Panel 
All League Club- 
; house 

9 


Robert Q. Lewis 
Show 



Afternoon Programs 



12:00 

12:15 
12:30 
12:45 

1:00 
1:15 
1:30 
1:45 


National Farm & 
Home Hour 

Monitor 


1 Asked You 

Tex Fletcher 
Wagon Show 


News Noon News 
12:05 How To Fix It 12:05 Romance 
101 Ranch Boys 
American Farmer Gunsmoke 


Monitor 


Fifth Army Band 
Ruby Mercer 


News City Hospital 
1:05 Navy Hour 1:25 News, Jackson 
Vincent Lopez Stan Daugherty 
Presents 


2:00 Monitor 

2:15 

2:30 

2:45 


Ruby Mercer (con.) 
2:25 News 
Sports Parade 


News Dance Orchestra 
2:05 Festival, with 
Milton Cross Jazz Band Ball 


3:00 
3:15 
3:30 
3:45 


Monitor 


Country Jamboree 


News 

3:05 Festival con- 
tinues with 
Chautauqua 
Symphony 


String Serenade 
Skinnay Ennis Orch. 


4:00 

4:15 

4:30 
4:45 


Monitor 


Bandstand, U.SJt. 


News 

4:05 Festival (con.) 


Treasury Show 


5:00 

5:1 C 
5:30 

5:45 


Monitor 


Teenagers, U.S.A. 
5:55 News 


News 

5:05 Dinner At The 
Green Room 


Adventures In 

Science 
Richard Hayes 
News, Jackson 
5:35 Saturday At 

The Chase 



Evening Programs 



6:00 

6:15 
6:30 

6:45 


Monitor 


John T. Flynn 

World Traveler 
Report From 

Washington 
Basil Heatter 


News News 
6:05 Pan-American 

Union 

Sports Review 
Sports Kaleidoscope Capitol Cloakroom 
Bob Edge, Sports 

Afield 6:55 Joe Foss, Sports 


7:00 

7:15 

7:30 
7:45 


Monitor 


Pop The Question 


News 

7:05 At Ease 

Overseas 

Assignment 
Labor-Management 

Series 


News, Jackson 
7:05 Make Way For 
Youth 

Gangbusters 


8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 


Monitor 


Quaker City Capers 


News 

8:05 Dance Party 


21st Precinct 

Disk Derby, 
Fred Rabbins 


9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 


Monitor 


Hawaii Calls 
Lombardo Land 


News 

9:05 Dance Party 
(con.) 


Two For The Money 

Your Hit Parade 
9:55 News, Jackson 


10:00 

10:15 
10:30 


Monitor 

Grand Ole Opry 




News 

10:05 Edison 
1 Hotel Orch. 
Lawrence Welk 


Country Style (con.) 
Dance Orchestra 



Sunday 



HBC 



Morning Programs 

8:30 {Monitor 
8:45 



MBS 



9:00 World News 
9:15 Roundup 

9:30 I 

9:45 lArt Of Living 



10:00 National Radio 
10:15: Pulpit 

10:30 Monitor 
10:45 



11:00 
11:15 
11:30 
11:45 



Monitor 



New World 



Wings Of Healing 
Back To God 



News 

9:05 Great Moments 
OfGreatComposers 
Voice Of Prophecy 



Radio Bible Class 
Voice Of Prophecy 



Frank And Ernest 

Christian Science 

Monitor 
Northwestern 

Reviewing Stand 



ABC 



Light And Life Hour 



CBS 



Renfro Valley 
8:55 Galen Drake 



News 

10:05 Message Of 

Israel 
News 
10:35 College Choir 



Sunday Melodies 
11:05 Marines On 
Review 

News 

11:35 Christian In 
Action 



World News Roundup 
Sidney Walton Show 

Organ Music, 

E. Power Biggs 
9:55 News, Trout 



Church Of The Air 



Church Of The Air 
(con.) 



Salt Lake Tabernacle 
Choir 



Invitation To 
Learning— "The 
Out-Of-Doors" 



Afternoon Programs 



12:00 

12:15 
12:30 

12:45 


Monitor 

The Eternal Light 


Marine Band 

News, Bill Cunning- 
ham 
Merry Mailman 


The World Tomorrow 


News, LeSueur 
12:05 The Leading 

Question 
Foreign Affairs 

Washington Week 


1:00 

1:15 
1:30 

1:45 


Monitor 


Basil Heatter, 

News 
Christian Science 
Lutheran Hour 


Herald Of Truth 

News 

1:35 Pilgrimage 


Woolworth Hour- 
Percy Faith, 
Donald Woods 


2:00 
2:15 
2:30 
2:45 


The Catholic Hour 


Music From Britain 


Dr. Oral Roberts 
Wings Of Healing 


Kathy Godfrey 

World Music 
Festival 


3:00 

3:15 
3:30 
3:45 


Monitor 


Music From Britain 

(con.) 
Bandstand, U.S.A 


News 

3:05 Pan American 

Union 
Hour Of Decision 


World Music 
Festival (con.) 


4:00 
4:15 
4:30 
4:45 


Monitor 


Salute To The Nation 

Nick Carter 

4:55 Lome Greene 


Old-Fashioned 
Revival Hour 


Rhythm On The 
Road 


5:00 
5:15 
5:30 
5:45 


Monitor 


Adventures Of Rin 

Tin Tin 
Wild Bill Hickok 
5:55 News 


News 

5:05 Disaster 

Church In The Home 


News, Trout 
5:05 On A Sunday 
Afternoon (con.) 
5:55 News, Trout 



Evening Progran 

6:00 Meet The Press 

6:15 

6:30 iMonitor 

6:45 1 


ns 

Public Prosecutor- 
Jay Jostyn 

On The Line, Bob 
Considine 

All Star Sport Time 


Monday Morning 

Headlines 
Paul Harvey. News 
Evening Comes 


Gene Autry 
Summer In St. Louis 


7:00 

7:15 
7:30 
7:45 


Monitor 


Richard Hayes Show 
Studio Concert 


News 

7:05 Showtime 

Revue 
George Sokolsky 
Valentino 
Travel Talk 


Juke Box Jury 


8:00 
8:15 
8:30 
8:45 

9:00 
9:15 
9:30 
9:45 

10:00 

10:15 
10:30 


Monitor 




West Point Band 
Enchanted Hour 


American Town 

j Meeting 


Our Miss Brooks 
Gary Crosby 


Monitor 




Fulton Lewis, Jr. 
Success Story 
Manion Forum 
Keep Healthy 


News, Paul Harvey 
News, Quincy Howe 
Sammy Kaye 
9:55 News 


Music Hall, 
Mitch Miller 


Fibber McGee & 

Molly 
Joseph C. Harsch 
American Forum 


Billy Graham 
Global Frontiers 


Elmer Davis, News 

Seven Deadly Sins 
Revival Time 


News, Schorr 
10:05 Face The Na- 
tion 
John Derr, Sports 



See Xext Page- 



I V program highlights 



NEW YORK CITY AND SUBURBS AND NEW HAVEN, CHANNEL 8, AUGUST 8— SEPTEMBER 9 



Baseball on TV 



DATE 


TIME 


CH. 


AUGUST 






9, Tu. 


8:00 


9 




8:15 


11 


10. W. 


2:00 


11 




8:00 


9 


11, Th. 


2:00 


11 


12, F. 


8:00 


9 




8:00 


11 


13, Sat. 


2:00 


2,8,9 




2:00 


11 


14, Sun. 


2:00 


8,9 




2:00 


11 


16, Tu. 


8:00 


11 


17, W. 


8:00 


11 


18. Th. 


1:30 


11 


19, F. 


8:00 


9 




8:15 


11 


ZO, Sat. 


2:00 


8,11 




2:25 


2 




8:00 


9 


21, Sun. 


2:00 


8,11 


23, Tu. 


8:00 


9 




8:00 


11 


24, W. 


1:30 


9 




1:30 


11 


25, Th. 


1:30 


9 




1:30 


11 



GAME 

Giants vs. Dodgers 
Boston TS. Yanks 
Boston vs. Yanks 
Giants vs. Dodgers 
Boston TS. Yanks 
Phila. vs. Dodgers 
Pgh. vs. Giants 
Phila. vs. Dodgers 
Pgh. vs. Giants 
Phila. vs. Dodgers 
Pgh. vs. Giants 
Dodgers vs. Giants 
Dodgers vs. Giants 
Dodgers vs. Giants 
Dodgers vs. Phil.-K 
Bait. vs. Yanks 
Bait. vs. Yanks 
Detroit vs. Cliicago 
Dodgers vs. Phil.-K 
Bait. vs. Y'anks 
Chicago vs. Dodgers 
St. L. vs. Giants 
Chicago vs. Dodgers 
St. L. vs. Giants 
Cine. vs. Dodgers 
Mil. vs. Giants 



D — Doubleheader R — Road game 

DATE TIME CH. GAME 



26, 


F. 


8:00 


9 


Cine. vs. Dodgers 






8:00 


11 


Mil. vs. Giants 


27, 


Sat. 


2:00 


2,8,9 


Cine. vs. Dodgers 






2:00 


11 


Mil. vs. Giants 


28, 


Sun. 


2:00 


8,9 


St. TLi. vs. Dodgers 






2:00 


11 


Chicago vs. Giants 


29, 


M. 


1:30 


9 


St. Ii. vs. Dodgers 






1:30 


11 


Chicago vs. Giants 


30, 


Tu. 


8:00 


9 


Mil. vs. Dodgers 






8:00 


11 


Cine. vs. Giants 


31, 


W. 


1:30 


11 


Cine. vs. Giants 






8:00 


9 


Mil. vs. Dodgers 


SEPT. 








1, 


Th. 


1:30 


9 


Mil. vs. Dodgers 






1:30 


11 


Cine. vs. Giants 


2, 


F. 


2:00 


11 


Wash. vs. Yanks 






8:00 


9 


Pgh. vs. Dodgers 


3, 


Sat. 


2:00 


2 


Chicago vs. Cleve. 






2:00 


8,11 


Wash. vs. Yanks 






2:00 


9 


Pgh. vs. Dodgers 


4, 


Sun. 


2:00 


8,11 


Wash. vs. Yanks 






2:00 


9 


Pgh. vs. Dodgers 


b, 


M. 


1:30 


9 


Phila. vs. Dodgers-D 






1:30 


11 


Pgh, vs. Giants-D 


7, 


W. 


2:00 


11 


Kan. C. vs. Yanks 






10:00 


9 


Dodgers vs. Mil.-B 



74 



Monday through Friday 



& [a] Today— Getway with Garroway 
Herb Sheldon— Plus Jo McCarthy 
Skinner Show — Everything's George 
Tales Of The Trail-Kid stufF 
Garry Moore Show— Moore fun 
& [U Ding Dong School— TV nursery 
Godfrey Time — Relax with Arthur 
& [s] Way Of The World-Drama 
& [T| Sheilah Graham— She tells all 
Home— Arlene Francis, homemaker 
Romper Room— For little people 
&{1] Strike it Rich-Warren Hull 
Wendy Barrie— Gay gal talk 
Valiant lady— Daytime drama 
& [¥] Tennessee Ernie— Pea-picking 
& [U Love Of Life— Serial story 
& [|] Search For Tomorrow— Serial 
Feather Your Nest— Quiz show 
(& 1j] at 2:30)-The Guiding Light 
Dr. Norman Vincent Peale 
Jack Paar Show— Jack's Jake! 
Norman Brokenshire Show— Gay 
Claire Mann — Glamour treatment 
& [s] Welcome Travelers— From NYC 
First-Run Feature Films 
& [s] Robert Q. Lewis Show— Lively 
Maggi McNeills— Chit-chat 
Summer Entertainment— Variety 
Art Linkletter's House Party— Fun! 
Ern Westmore — Beauty hints 
& [U Big Pay-Off— Mink-lined quiz 
Ted Mack Show— Variety 
Ted Steele Show— Music & talk 
Bob Crosby— With Gary & Cathy 
it Pays To Be Married— Bill Goodwin 
The Brighter Day— Daytime drama 
& [s] Hawkins Falls— Serial 
& [H Secret Storm— Daily story 
First Love — Drama of newlyweds 
& [s] On Your Account— Quiz 
Mr. Sweeney— Chuckles with Ruggles 

EARLY EVENING 

Jr. Featurama— Great for kids 
Sky's The Limit— Quiz 
Liberace — Music by candlelight 
Soupy Sales- Comedy with puppets 
Matt Dennis Show— Music, M, W, F; 
Vaughn Monroe Show, T, Th. 
O Million Dollar Movies 
7:45 O Julius La Rosa— Songs, M, W, F 



7:00 


o 


8:55 


o 


9:00 


& 




o 


10:00 


o 




o 


10:30 


o 




9 


10:45 


o 


11:00 


o 




e 


11:30 


o 






12:00 


o 




o 


12:15 


o 


12:30 


o 




o 


12:45 


o 




<D 


1:00 


o 




o 







1:30 


O 




O 


2:00 


O 




o 




G 


2:30 


o 






3:00 


o 




o 




o 


3:30 & 


4:00 


% 




o 


4:15 


o 




o 


4:30 


o 




o 


5:30 


o 


6:30 


o 







T 7:00 


o 


V 7:30 


o 


« V 


auq 



LATE NIGHT 
10:00 O Million Dollar Movies 
10:45 ® News & Weather Report 
11:00 Liberace— Valentino of the keyboard 
11:15 O The Late Show— Feature films 
O Steve Allen Show 



Monday P.M. 



8:00 O Burns & Allen— Repeat films 

O & m Caesar Presents; Aug. 22, 
8:00-9:30: "The King & Mrs. Candle," Cyril 
Ritchard, on Summer Special 
Q Digest Drama— Human-interest stories 
8:30 O Godfrey's Talent Scouts— Variety 

Q Voice Of Firestone — Summer concerts 
9:00 O & m Those Whiting Girls— Comedy 
O The Medic— Film re-runs 
Q Pee Wee King Showf — Corn-fed fun 
9:30 &[8] Ethel & Albert— Domestic fun 
Q Robert Montgomery Presents 
10:00 O & [s] Studio One Summer Theater 

O Eddie Cantor— Pop-eyed lafFs 
10:30 O Big Town— Mark Stevens stars 



Tuesday 



7:30 Waterfront— Preston Foster stars 
8:00 O & m Piece The Face-Bill Cullen 

Star Playhouse— Hollywood films 
8:30 O Music '55— Stan Kenton's sounds 

O Arthur Murray Dancing Party 
9:00 O & H] Meet Millie— Elena Verdugo 

Q Summer Theater— Half-hour films 

O Make Room For Daddy— Repeats 
9:30 Q &\s} Spotlight Playhouse— Drama 

O Dollar A Second— $$$ Quiz 
10:00 O $64,000 Question— Hal March quiz. 

O & d] Truth Or Consequences 
10:30 O The Search— Documentaries 

O Name's The Same— Bob & Ray 



Wednesday 



7:30 O Disneyland— Repeat films 

8:00 O Frankie Laine Show— Music galore 

8 Request Performance— Dramas 
(& [s] at 9:30) My Little Margie- 
Beginning Aug. 31: Father Knows Best 
O Wild West— Feature films 
9:00 O & [H The Millionaire— Stories 

O Kraft Theater— Fine, hour-long plays 
O Masquerade Party— Costume quiz 



9:30 O I've Got A Secret— Panel quiz 

O Penny To A Million— Bill Goodwin 
10:00 Q &[|]U.S. Steel Theater— Alternates 
with Front Row Center 

O This is Your Life— Re-runs 
10:30 O Doug Fairbanks Presents— Stories 



Thursday 



8:00 Bob Cummings Show— Farce 
O & [§] Best Of Groucho— Re-runs 
O Soldier Parade— Hour of Gl variety 
8:30 O Climax— Suspense & mystery 
O Make The Connection— Quiz 
9:00 O & [i] Dragnet— Film repeats 

O Star Tonight— Filmed teleplays 
9:30 Four Star Playhouse— Excellent 
O & d] Ford Theater— Re-runs 
10:00 Johnny Carson— Bright comedy 

O & [U Lux Studio Workshop— Drama 
10:30 Halls Of ivy-The Ronald Colmons 



Friday 



7:30 Life With Elizabeth— Light-hearted 
8:00 & [§] Pantomime Quiz— On Aug. 
26, Mama returns with live comedy 

O Midwestern Hayride— Hoedown 
8:30 Topper— Last four weeks 

O & d] Life Of Riley— Comedy re-runs 
9:00 Playhouse Of Stars— Filmed dramas 

O & [f] Best in Mystery— Whodunits 
9:30 Meet Mr. McNulty— Re-runs 

O & H Dear Phoebe— Comedy re-runs 

O The Vise— Spine-Chillers from Britain 
10:00 Undercurrent— Mystery & adventure 
10:30 Windows— Ambitious drama series 

O So This is Hollywood— Rib-tickling 

Alec Templeton— Enchanting music 



Saturday 



7:30 Beat The Clock— Stunts for prizes 

O Show Wagon— Heidt's talent salute 
8:00 America's Greatest Bands— Tops 

O The Soldiers— Comedy 
8:30 O Dunninger Show— Mystifying 
9:00 Two For The Money— Sam Levenson 
O & [U Musical Chairs— Stars Johnny 
Mercer; Aug. 27: "One Touch Of Venus." 
9:30 Down You Go— Witty panel patter 
O Durante— O'Connor Show— Re-runs 
10:00 Julius La Rosa— TV's top tunes 

O & {U Here's The Show— Gobel rests 
10:30 Damon Runyon Theater— Stories 
O & [U Your Play Time 



Sunday 



6:00 I Love Lucy— Repeat of early shows 
7:00 Let's Take A Trip 

O & [U People Are Funny— Linkletter 
7:30 Private Secretary— Re-runs 

O Do it Yourself; Aug. 14, 7:30-8:30: 
Tam O'Shanter Golf Tournament 
8:00 & tu Toast Of The Town— Variety 

O Sunday Hour— Comedy & variety 
9:00 G-E Theater— Ronald Reagan, host 

O & m TV Playhouse— Hour teleplays 

Chance Of A Lifetime— Variety 
9:30 Appointment With Adventure 

Life Begins At Eighty— Sprightly 
10:00 Stage 7— New stories 

O & {U Cameo Theater— On Aug. 28, 
Loretta Young Show returns 

Break The Bank— Bert Parks, quiz 
10:30 What's My Line— Job game 

O Bob Cummings Show— Comedy 

Paris Precinct— Louis Jourdan stars 



Winsome 
Annie Oakley 

(Continued from page 32) 
riding boots in the morning — and ex- 
changes them twelve hovirs later for dainty 
dancing slippers. 

As a little girl, Gail had no choice ex- 
cept to become a tomboy, unless she 
wanted to miss all the fun. She was the 
oidy girl in a neighborhood crowded with 
boys. If she wanted to play with them, she 
had to join their games, or be left out. 

"Hie advantages of being the only girl 
were not obvious until some years later. 
At that age, being a member of the wejiker 
sex had many more drawbacks — not the 
least of these being that, whatever the 
game, Gail was the victim. If they were 
cops and robbers, sooner or later she got 
clobbered on the head "while taking off 
with the bankroll." When they were cow- 
boys and Indians, she was tagged the "out- 
law" and was tied to trees or punished in 
any number of ways which would have 
done credit to a Hollywood scenario. 

Once, to help her hide from the law, two 
"feUow criminals" Hfted her to the top 
of a tree — only to forget about her at din- 
ner time, when they rushed home for their 
meal. Five-year-old Gail had but one way 
to get down — in a straight line. Ten min- 
utes later, she was taken to the hospital 
with a broken leg. 

Another time, the boys built a midget 
soap-box racer and pulled it up a steep 
hill. "Who's going to try it first?" one of 
the older boys asked. When no volunteers 
answered, twelve pairs of eyes turned 
to nine-year-old Gail. "Oh, no! Not me. 
I don't even know — " 

That's as far as she got by the time they 
had lifted her into the racer, and not too 
gently shoved her on the way. Halfway 
down, she smashed into a parked car and, 
when she woke up again, saw her father— 
a doctor by profession, fortunately — set her 
arm. Yet in spite of her mishaps, and she 
had more than her share, Gail enjoyed 
roughing it. 

But, all along, her desire for femininity 
showed itself in various ways. In the 
morning she may have toted guns, but in 
the afternoon she sneaked in to her 
mother's wardrobe closet for one of her 
dresses, hats, and high-heeled shoes. AU 
little girls play "dress-up" games. Gail, 
however, went one step further. To com- 
plete the "grown-up" iUusion, she also put 
on her mother's lipstick — and perfume. 

For many weeks her mother, Mrs. Gray- 



OCTOBER HEROES 

Watch for these intimate stories and 
exclusive pictures: 

Tennessee Ernie Ford 

(he's on the cover, too!) 

• 

Garry Moore 

• 

Steve Lawrence of Tonight 

* 

John Baragrey 

* 

Tommy ReHig (and "Lassie," too) 

* 

all in October 
TV RADIO MIRROR 

at your newsstand September 6 



TyCESS WEIGHT ... The Killer! 



between 









~/^i 



^ 



^yT-j 



W:i'MB 



&?s 



tUmnty 



REDUCE INCHES NOW! 

A Ful/ Mouth of 

SAFE, SENSIBLE MENUS 

NO CALORIES TO COUNT, 

by the author of 

"MAN ALIVE 

You're Half Dead" 



Di» 



LOSE FATTY WEIGHT 

WITHOUT INJURING 

VITAL BODY TISSUES 

Make No Mistake — If you are exces- 
sively overweight you are endangering 
your normal life span, and according 
to medical science you'd better LOSE 
EXCESS FAT QUICKLY! In his book, 
"SLENDERIZING for New Beauty", 
Dr. Munro shows you the real danger 
in FATTY WEIGHT and how you 
can REDUCE INCHES FAST! Flabby, 
excess fat harms you when it is de- 
posited as cholesterol in the arteries. 
Medical authorities state that a steady 
build-up of this substance may cause 
premature aging and perhaps death. 
Dr. Munro's book tells you step-by- 
step how to lose this threatening fat 
and to LOSE WEIGHT SAFELY! 
BEST OF ALL — by following the 
principles in this book you can revital- 
ize your system while you are actually 
reducing. You'll LOSE WEIGHT — 
LOSE INCHES! 



CAUTION 

Reducing may be harm- 
ful if you don't lose 
flabby fat with It-the 
wrong kind of diet may 
result in weight loss 
at the expense of vital 
tissues, causing weak- 
ness, anemia and in- 
fections. Play Safe — 
follow a doctor's ad- 
vice . . . and that 
means Dr. Munro's 
"SLENDERIZING for 
New Beauty" 




TEST DR. MUNRO'S HEALTH-GIVING 
PRINCIPLES AT OUR EXPENSE! 

PAT EGGS, STEAK, OYSTERS, FAT, DRESSING, ICE CREAM, CREAMY 
C A I DESSERTS - 3 MEALS A DAY! You'll find everything you need to 
know about reducing right in this book— including a Complete 30 day diet, simple, 
helpful exercises, and advice on health to revitalize your body. 



Because Dr. 
Munro gives you 
a full month of 
suggested menus, 
you don't have to 
count calories to 
lose weight. He 
tells you just 
what to eat and 
■what to avoid! 



START 
RIGHT NOW 



MONEY- BACK 
GUARANTEE 

You can get this valu- 
able book in all book- 
stores for only $2.50 
per copy. However, if 
you wish to test "SLEN- 
DERIZING for New 
Beauty" for 10 days— 
IVIAILTHIS COUPON. If 
you are not delighted 
with results you may 
return the book in 10 
days for a full $2.50 
refund. 



BARTHOLOMEW HOUSE INC., r^IVss 

205 East 42nd St., New York 17, N. Y. 

Please send me postpaid a copy of "SLENDER- 
IZING for New Beauty". I enclose S2.50. If I am 
not delighted with results, I may return book in 
10 days for full refund. 



Narne 

Address 



City.., 



..Zone State... 



J 



75 



son, couldn't figure out why the contents 
of her bottles disappeared so rapidly. 
Neither could Dr. Grayson, who had to 
replenish them. The mystery didn't clear 
up till the Sunday morning he came back 
from a trip to New York, with a five-ounce 
bottle of Arpege perfume for his wife. 

She'd hardly put it on her dresser — un- 
opened — to go downstairs and prepare 
breakfast, when her four-year-old daugh- 
ter crept into her room, pried open the 
lid, and liberally applied the contents on 
her arms, neck and forehead, just as 
"Mommy" put on cologne. At breakfast, 
the aroma of Arpege completely eclipsed 
that of the bacon and eggs. Suspicious, 
Mrs. Grayson rushed upstairs and found 
her new bottle half-empty! 

Gail's craving for perfvime persists to 
this day. Whether she made $15 a week 
during school vacation as her father's 
secretary, $150 a week at M-G-M, or her 
present, much higher, salary on TV, a 
good percentage <rf it goes into Chanel 
No. 5, Joy, Empire, or White Shoulders. 

As Gail grew up — and into her mother's 
size — quite regularly Mrs. Grayson would 
search her closet in vain for one of her 
dresses, only to find her daughter wearing 
it. But she never really minded. "There's 
nothing wrong with a girl's desire for 
pretty clothes," she used to say, insisting 
that one of the prime functions of a female 
is to be feminine, graceful, and glamorous, 
whether she's two or eighty-two. Thus, she 
did her share to help Gail on her way — 
and by more methods than letting her bor- 
row her clothes. 

Mrs. Grayson was convinced — and so is 
Gail today — that "glamour" means much 
more than dressing to one's best advantage, 
that it includes such qualifications as good 
bearing, charm, gracefulness and self- 
assurance. That's why she enrolled Gail 
in a dancing class when she was two — not 
to learn a few steps of tap and ballet, but 
to develop grace mid poise. 

At home, she taught her daughter man- 
ners and lady-Mke behavior by setting a 
good example, never by threatening or 
actually administering punishment. And, 
after Gail finished high school, to round 
out her "polishing,," she was sent to one 
of the finest finishing schools in the coun- 
try, Harkum CaHege for Girls, at Bryn 
Mawr, Pennsylvania; 

Here again, Gail's struggle within her- 
self came to the surface. She loved the 
finishing school, the graceful way of living, 
the companionship of some of the finest, 



best brought-up young girls in the coun- 
try. But, at the same time, she had a 
hankering for a more carefree life, for 
wide-open spaces, and for "roughing it." 
After two years, she left Harkum College 
to continue her education at the University 
of Texas — where she was just as much in 
her element as in Bryn Mawr. 

Today, Gail is one of the most attractive 
young women in television. But there have 
been times when it looked as though 
"glamour" was no more than a word in 
the dictionary, when she could have been 
disillusioned — except for her own common 
sense and the down-to-earth attitude of 
her mother. Take the scar on her cheek, 
still visible today. 

She was just three when her little bud- 
dies egged her on to catch a hound which 
was known to be somewhat ferocious. Gail 
caught him, all right. But, in the process, 
she fell, the dog stepped on her, and — just 
to prove his grievance and superiority — bit 
her in the face. Her screams quickly 
brought her father, who sewed up her 
cheek with fourteen stitches extending 
from the right eye to her chin. Dr. Gray- 
son did such an expert job that the scar 
is hardly noticeable any more. Yet there 
might have been a time when a girl more 
vain than Gail could have cohsidered this 
a handicap. 

Like many teenagers, she went through 
the "chubby" stage, when no matter how 
much or how little she ate, she just kept 
expanding in all directions. Her mother, 
knowing what the results could be, took 
prompt and drastic action. "You'll have to 
go on a diet" she informed her thirteen- 
year-old daughter one morning. 

Gail didn't sound happy. "What does that 
mean, Mom?" 

"First of all, no more starchy food. No 
potatoes, bread, macaroni, spaghetti, and, 
mostly, no hot fudge sxuidaes and fried 
chicken!" She'd listed practically all of 
Gail's favorite foods. 

But that was only the beginning. "You'll 
also have to do exercises every morning." 
To make it easier for Gail, Mrs. Grayson 
joined her in dieting as well as in exercis- 
ing. Every morning she came in, about 
half an hour before her daughter got up, 
carrying a big glass of orange juice, "to 
give her pep." So sleepy was Gail she 
could hardly see the glass, but somehow 
she managed to grab it and get it to her 
lips. "Now let's get out of bed and start 
the exercises." 

To this date, Gail has never given up 




/ 



76 



It made me a better wifei 

riearing how other people have solved real-life 
problems of love and hate and fear often helps 
you to a better, happier life. And you hear just 
that — real people grappling with deep emotional 
problems — on radio's "My True Story." You'll recog- 
nize each tender situation because it is as true as 
life itself — taken from the files of "True Story Mag- 
azine." And you may well find the solution to the 
most difficult problem of your. life. 

TUNE IN 

"MY TRUE STORY" 

American Broadcasting Stations 

She thought [ler great love could conquer the evil in him. Read "OUTLAW'S WOMAN" in 
September TRUE STORY MAGAZINE at newsstands now. 



dieting, nor exercising, though she isn't 
doing it quite in the same manner any 
longer. She does her exercises only when 
she is not actually working — which is 
about six months out of twelve. (Usual- 
ly, when she finishes her television com- 
mitments, she heads back to Little Rock, 
Arkansas, to join her family.) When she's 
in front of the cameras, she gets all the 
physical exercise she needs. Anything in 
addition would be strictly superfluous. 

As for dieting, Gail has found a unique 
solution which lets her eat her favorite 
chocolate sundaes and fried chicken and 
all sorts of potatoes — and still keep down 
her weight. One week, she sticks to rare 
meats and greens, won't even touch a bis- 
cuit for lunch. ITie next she goes all out 
for anything that appeals to her. Somehow 
it evens out, because Gail has one of the 
cutest figures in TVdom. 

On one occasion, however, she overdid 
her dieting. During her early college days, 
she used to idolize a young star, Dixie 
Dunbar, who was approximately Gail's 
height — but quite a bit thinner. "H I want 
to be like her, I have to get all my 
measurements down to her size," Gail 
rationalized, and promptly went on a diet 
of black coffee and greens. 

At the time, she was playing the lead in 
a college play. In one scene, in which she 
was supposed to laugh hysterically, di- 
rector Richard Nash (who later scored in 
Hollywood with such hits as "Welcome 
Stranger") thought she was too con- 
vincing for an amateur. He knew he was 
right, just a few minutes later, when she 
collapsed on the set and was rushed to the 
infirmary, where the doctor said there was 
nothing wrong with her that a good meal 
couldn't fix. 

After twelve hours' sleep and a break- 
fast the following morning that would have 
put Burl Ives to shame, Gail was all right 
again. She also decided that, as long as 
her height was the same as Dixie Dunbar's, 
maybe it wouldn't matter quite so much if 
her waist measured a few inches more. 

For a long time, Gail considered "glam- 
our" and "sophistication" synonymous. She 
had to learn the hard way that this is not 
necessarily so; that a girl is better off de- 
veloping her own strong points, whatever 
they are, rather than reaching for some- 
thing she doesn't possess, or pretending to 
be someone she is not. 

In her anxiety to appear grown-up and 
sophisticated, time was moving along too 
slowly for Gail. At four she wanted to be 
ten; at ten, twenty; and, at thirteen — she 
did something about it. 

Before leaving with a beau for a club 
meeting, she decided the time had come 
to wear high-heeled shoes. Speculating 
that her parents wouldn't approve, she 
waited till her mother had left the house, 
then got a pair from her mother's closet 
and put them on. 

Having forgotten something at home, 
Mrs. Grayson pulled up in front of the 
house just as Gail was walking down the 
driveway. Disbelievingly, she stared at her 
daughter, who was weaving and swaying 
all over the driveway. Never having worn 
high heels, Gail felt and looked as though 
she were walking on stilts. 

Her mother promptly marched her em- 
barrassed daughter back into the house 
and made her change into low heels. An- 
other year passed before Gail was per- 
mitted to experiment with "sophisticated 
footwear," as she used to call it. 

In spite of such occasional faux pas, 
Gail developed into a very sensible young 
woman who, at heart, knew what was good 
for her. Unfortunately, not everybody did. 

On a visit to Hollywood, she was dis- 
covered by an agent who found her sun- 
bathing on the roof garden of the Holly- 
wood Roosevelt, where she was staying. 



He promptly told Louis B. Mayer, then 
head of M-G-M, about the attractive girl, 
and made an appointment for her to see 
him the next day. When introduced, Gail 
made an immediate impression on Rlr. 
Mayer and, twenty-four hours later, was 
signed to a contract. 

Had the studio left her as she was, it 
would have been more beneficial for the 
contractor and contractee. But it was the 
Hollywood custom to turn each new find 
into a copy of the cvirrent glamour girl — 
which meant they were all made to look 
like Hedy Lamarr, Lana Turner, Rita Hay- 
worth, or whoever happened to be most 
popular at that precise moment. 

Gail was too shy to object, when she 
should have. '"Like most of the other girls 
I was sent through the complete glamour 
mill," she later lamented. "When I "grad- 
uated,' I looked little different from the 
other newcomers on the lot. We all wore 
our hair the same way, used almost identi- 
cal make-up, even dressed with much 
similarity. Result: Because I looked like 
everybody else, they really didn't need me. 
Before long, I was out of a job!" 

A few months later, she went through 
the w^hole process all over, this time at 
RKO, and with the same result. After 
minor parts in a few pictures, she once 
again found herself outside the studio 
gates. Having learned her lesson, from 
then on, she refused to be anyone but 
herself. "That's what Gene Autry liked when 
she was introduced to him, the reason he 
gave her a chance to play opposite him in 
feature Westerns, and eventually built the 
Annie Oakley series around her. 

Actually, while Gail is quite the glam- 
our girl off-screen, her younger fans 
weren't so wTong when they claimed she 
can be glamorous even as a cowgirl. 

About a fourth of her time is spent in 
town, when the "inside scenes" of her 



series are shot at the "Flying A" studio 
on Sunset Boulevard, when she can drive 
to the Hollywood Roosevelt for lunch and, 
at night, back to the San Fernando Valley 
apartment she shares with actress Nan 
Leslie. 

But most of the scenes are filmed on 
location: At Pioneer Town in the Mojave 
Desert, about twenty miles east of Twenty- 
nine Palms; at Lone Pine, 10,000 feet above 
sea level, in some of California's most 
rugged country; at other locations where 
the climate is severe, work days long — 
often seven days a week without a day 
off — and living conditions almost as primi- 
tive as those of the heroine she portrays 
on the screen. 

Gail's work in itself is difficult, exhaust- 
ing, and often physically dangerous, which 
is obvious to anyone who has watched her 
"running mounts," galloping into camera 
range, ascending or descending steep hills. 
(Amazingly, with all the difficult riding 
Gail had to do these past fifteen months, 
her only accident occurred at Hollywood 
and Vine when — stepping out of her car — 
she slipped of? the sidewalk and injured 
her leg!) 

On location, Gail is often the only girl 
among dozens of men. It would be easy for 
her to acquire some of the rough and ready 
mannerisms of the male sex, of "letting 
herself go" after work, of coming to din- 
ner just as she left the last scene. But that's 
not like her. 

Imagine the surprised expression of a 
visitor to Pioneer Town who, having seen 
Gail perform one of her stunts just before 
sunset, sees her again an hour later at the 
"Golden Stallion," the only restaurant, 
dressed smartly in skirt and blouse, look- 
ing as attractive as if she'd just stepped 
out of a beauty shop. He wouldn't know 
that, no matter how hard she works dur- 
ing the day, at night Annie Oakley invar- 



iably becomes Gail Davis again — which is 
duly appreciated by all around her. 

Working in the desert presents many 
problems for a girl who values her appear- 
ance. The strong, penetrating rays of the 
sun, the high winds and sand storms — and, 
not least, the sudden temperature changes 
when the sun goes down and the mercury 
often drops to 80° below what it was at 
high noon — can be most damaging to a 
girl's complexion. 

It takes a lot of effort on Gail's part to 
combat these elements. In the desert or 
high • mountains, she makes certain she 
wears plenty of make-up to protect herself 
from the siui's rays and, when she gets 
back to her room, cleans it off thoroughly, 
then washes her face several times with 
ice-cold water to stimulate circulation. 
After that, she applies lotion or baby oil — 
and is all set for the next day. 

Gail has one more formula to keep her- 
self in good shape: plenty of rest. On loca- 
tion, she usually turns in right after din- 
ner. Even in Hollywood, she only goes 
out or gives a party on Sunday nights, 
and then insists on being brought home 
early. But what she misses out on in quan- 
tity, she makes up in quality. For Gail, 
there's no "run-of-the-mill" date. Each 
is a special occasion for which to be 
dressed and prepared. 

When she and her roommate, Nan Les- 
lie, give a party at home, it's always a 
miniature gala affair, with fancy foods, ex- 
quisite table settings, dinner music and 
candlelight — against the soft, pastel-colored 
background of their walls, carefully se- 
lected to give them the most complimen- 
tary setting. 

In the first fifty-two Annie Oakley shows 
she did, Gail wore only o